Sunday, February 17, 2019

QSL Report

QSL Report


QSL listings are from various post, from the February 2019 issue of NASWA, Listener's Notebook.

Information edited for clarity by Teak Publishing


QSL via Gayle Van Horn Collection
Brazil
6135 kHz, QSL Radio Aparecida. Received in 2.5 months. Verification card from Cassiano Macedo, for Portuguese reception report. Program details to: contato@a12.com; producao@radioaparecida.com.br; and cassianomac@yahoo.com.br. (Ivan Zelenyi-Russia, HCDX/Jan 19/WWDXC-TopNews)

Bulgaria
9400 kHz, The Mighty KBC via Kostinbrod. Full data E-QSL for English program. Received in four days for program details to: themightykbc@gmail.com. (Hansjoerg Biener-Germany/WWDXC-Top News)

China
9520 kHz, PBS Nei Menggu (Hohhot). E-QSL received in one day, for Chinese program. Program details to: yinglian@cri.com.cn. (Rudolf Grimm-Brazil/WWDXC-Top News)

4850 kHz, PBS Xinjiang (Urumqi), E-QSL received in three days for Kazakh program details to: yinglian@cri.com.cn. (Rudolf Grimm-Brazil/WWDXC/Top News)

China (Tibet) 4905 kHz. Holy Tibet. Full data QSL card Potala Palace in Lhasa. Received in 104 days for Tibetan program details to: holytibetprogram@163.com. (Alexander Golovikhin-Russia/WWDXC-Top News)

Clandestine
9975 kHz. Furusato no Kaze, Full data verification letter and frequency schedule in Japanese/Korean. Received in 113 days for program details to: info@rachi.go.jp. (Alexander Golovikhin-Russia/WWDXC/Top News)


Germany
6005 kHz. Voice of Mongolia via Kall, Germany relay. Handwritten partial data QSL on a greeting card. Received in 18 days for English programming. E-report to: vomen@yahoo.com  (Hansjoerg Biener-Germany/WWDXC/Top News)

India
9620 kHz, All India Radio via Aligarh and Delhi on 11560. Full data QSL card. Received in 111 days for e-report to: spectrum-manager@air.org.in. (Ivan Zelenyi-Russia/DX Fanzine)

Thailand
Radio Thailand. After a repeated reminder at the end of November, a new QSL card from Radio Thailand was received for a report dated June 20, 2018. The card’s theme is Democracy Monument, a public monument in the center of Bangkok, Photo by Pori Kittawornrat. Frequency schedule also received. (Dmitry Elagin, Saratov-RUS, via RUSdx #1008/WWDXC/Top News)

Friday, February 15, 2019

LATE BREAKING NEWS - WWV ... Lives On !!




Now that the bill has been signed on February 15, 2019 by President Trump, WWV is fully funded.

It’s a celebratory year for the WWV stations. The fiscal year (FY) 2019 budget — once signed — will include full funding for the stations, which also mark their 100th year this fall. The WWV Centennial Committee has a tentative agreement with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to mount a special event station this fall adjacent to the WWV site in Colorado to mark the 100th anniversary of the time and frequency standard station, the world’s oldest continuously operating radio station. A memorandum of understanding is in the works.

Dave Swartz, W0DAS, of the Northern Colorado Amateur Radio Club (NCARC) heads the committee, which is developing plans for an NCARC special event from September 28 through October 2, with a NIST centennial observance tentatively set for October 1.

The NIST budget for WWV, WWVH, and WWVB will remain level for FY 2019. With the funding suspense over, Swartz told ARRL, “our committee is moving forward.”

Swartz and committee members Darren Kalmbach, KC0ZIE, and Kevin Utter, N7GES, met on February 8 with WWV/WWVB/WWVH Station Manager John Lowe, WWV Electronics Technician Glenn Nelson, and WWV Chief Engineer Matt Deutch, N0RGT.

“This was the first meeting for the committee and the first to include NIST upper management,” said Swartz, who called the meeting “very productive.” Swartz said NIST management is “on board” with the celebration, and Deutch plans to attend Hamvention May 17 – 19 to promote the centennial event.

Although the US government cannot fund any Amateur Radio special event expenses, the club members will be allowed to use a 15-acre parcel on WWV property, Swartz explained on the WWV Centennial website. “The operating site lies outside the security fence and simplifies logistics,” he said.

Swartz hopes that other clubs in Colorado will be able to pitch in to make the WWV Centennial a success. The WWV Centennial Committee will meet again on February 22.
(ARRL)

Mid-Winter Schedule Updates


Information edited for clarity by Teak Publishing

All times UTC

Clandestine
JSR Shiokaze / Sea Breeze
Effective: 14 Feb. 2019
1300-1400 6085 YAM 300 kW / 280 deg to NEAs, ex 7345 as follows
1300-1330 Chinese Mon; Japanese Tue/Sat; Korean Wed/Fri/Sun; English Thu
1330-1400 Korean Mon/Wed/Fri/Sat; Japanese Tue/Sun; English Thu
1405-1435 6085 YAM 300 kW / 280 deg to NEAs Japanese Daily, ex 7295
1600-1700 7440 YAM 300 kW / 280 deg to NEAs, ex 6095 as follows
1600-1630 Chinese Mon; Japanese Tue/Sat; Korean Wed/Fri/Sun; English Thu
1630-1700 Korean Mon/Wed/Fri/Sat; Japanese Tue/Sun; English Thu

Voice of Tibet
Effective: 14 Feb. 2019
Tibetan
1335-1400 9900 DB  100 kW / 131 deg to CeAs ex 9904

Nigeria
Radio Nigeria Kaduna via Issoudun, France relay -  now three hours per day
Hausa
0500-0700 on  7335 ISS 150 kW / 170 deg to WeAf
0700-0800 on 13840 ISS 150 kW / 170 deg to WeAf
0800-0900 on 13840 ISS 150 kW / 170 deg to WeAf inactive at present
0900-1500 on 17690 ISS 150 kW / 170 deg to WeAf inactive at present
2000-2300 on  7235 ISS 150 kW / 170 deg to WeAf inactive at present
(SWL/DX Bulgaria 14 Feb., 2019)

Shortwave Radiogram Schedules, February 15-17, 2019

Hello friends,

The International Space Station is transmitting SSTV again this weekend, until Sunday at  1725 UTC, on the usual 145.8 MHz (FM).

From your reports, I learned that last weekend's Shortwave Radiogram segment of Olivia 64-2000 succeeded when the MFSK32 and 64 showed errors due to poor reception conditions.You can see, and decode for yourself, this example of Olivia 64-2000 decoding 99% in very poor reception, with MFSK32 and 64 mostly unintelligible. For most listeners, reception was good enough that the Olivia 64-2000 was not necessary.

Videos of last weekend's Shortwave Radiogram (program 86) are provided by Scott in Germany (Friday 2030 UTC), Ralf in Germany (Saturday 1400 UTC) and DFS2010 in Japan (Sunday 0800 UTC 7730 kHz). Marco in Italy provided an example of the MFSK128 decoding from the WINB DRM transmission (video only, the music was not part of the broadcast). The audio archive is maintained by Mark in the UK. Analysis is prepared by Roger in Germany.

This weekend, hoping for some instances of bad reception, we will transmit another segment of Olivia 64-2000 (with another reminder about the Winter SWL Fest, 28 Feb-2 Mar). There will also be another broadcast via the WINB DRM transmitter, today (Friday) at 1500 UTC, 13690 kHz, likely with the content of last weekend's show.

Here is the lineup for Shortwave Radiogram, program 87, 15-17 February 2019, in modes as noted:

 1:41  MFSK32: Program preview
 2:53  Russia mulls test of disconnecting from the internet
 7:32  Olivia 64-2000: Winter SWL Fest reminder
11:17  MFSK64: Opportunity mission on Mars ends*
14:59  Mars MAVEN orbiter will dip closer to Mars*
19:24  Images of the week*
27:18  Closing announcements

* with image(s)

Please send reception reports to radiogram@verizon.net

And visit http://swradiogram.net
Twitter: @SWRadiogram or https://twitter.com/swradiogram (visit during the weekend to see listeners' results)
Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/567099476753304

Shortwave Radiogram Transmission Schedule
UTC Day UTC Time Frequency Transmitter
Friday 1500-1530 UTC 13690 kHz DRM
Program 86 audio probably WINB Pennsylvania
Friday 2030-2100 UTC 7780 kHz WRMI Florida
Saturday 0330-0400 UTC 9265 kHz WINB Pennsylvania
Saturday 1400-1430 UTC 9400 kHz Space Line Bulgaria
Saturday 1830-1900 UTC 9265 kHz WINB Pennsylvania
Sunday 0800-0830 UTC 5850 kHz
7730 kHz WRMI Florida
Sunday 2330-2400 UTC 7780 kHz WRMI Florida

Slow Scan Radio transmits SSTV images and text modes Saturdays at 1300-1330 UTC on 6070 kHz and 7440 kHz via Channel 292 in Germany -- according to the latest schedule information I have. The website is http://www.slowscanradio.com. Reception reports to x@xdv.me.

The Mighty KBC transmits to Europe Saturdays at 1300-1400 UTC on 11600 kHz from Bulgaria, with the minute of MFSK at about 1330 UTC (if you are outside of Europe, listen via websdr.ewi.utwente.nl:8901/ ). And to North America Sundays at 0000-0200 UTC (Saturday 7-9 pm EST) on 5960 kHz, via Germany. The minute of MFSK is at about 0130 UTC.  Reports to Eric: themightykbc@gmail.com . See also http://www.kbcradio.eu/ and https://www.facebook.com/TheMightyKbc/. 

New York and Pennsylvania NBEMS nets. Most weekends, as KD9XB, I check in to the New York NBEMS (Narrow Band Emergency Messaging Software) net Saturday at 1300 UTC on 3584 kHz USB, and the Pennsylvania NBEMS net Sunday at 1300 UTC on 3583 kHz USB. Check-ins are in Thor 22, and messages are in MFSK32. Messages usually use the Flmsg add-on to Fldigi. If you are a radio amateur in eastern North America, feel free to check in. Outside the region, use an SDR in the eastern USA to tune in and decode. You do not need Flmsg to check in, and most of the messages can be read without Flmsg. If you can decode the net, send me an email to radiogram@verizon.net , or tweet to @SWRadiogram , and I will let them know you are tuned in.

Thanks for your reception reports!
Kim
Kim Andrew Elliott, KD9XB
Producer and Presenter
Shortwave Radiogram
Reporting on international broadcasting at https://twitter.com/kaedotcom 

Thursday, February 14, 2019

The Radio Scene on the Islands of Macau

Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macau Bridge
After the end of the Pacific War, shortwave station CR8AA Radio Club Macau returned to the air and it was first noted in Australia on 7530 kHz with what was described as a good signal in August 1945.  Their first QSL card was a large oversized card with an artistic representation of a beach scene along the Macau coastline.

Two years later (1947), Radio News in the United States reported that the station was on the air daily with regular programming on 9500 kHz with a power output of just 200 watts.  The programming content was in three languages; Portuguese, Chinese and English.  At this stage, it was stated, Radio Macau was planning a power increase up to 1 kW.

Two years later again (1949), Radio Macau was off the air shortwave, though a new mediumwave channel was in use, 1270 kHz with again an output power of only 200 watts.  Apparently the shortwave transmitter had been re-engineered for use on a mediumwave channel.  At this stage, they were promising a power increase on shortwave up to 5 kW. 

After another two years, now 1951, a monitoring observation in the United States indicated that a 1 kW transmitter was on the air from Macau on 9500 kHz though it was not carrying the programming of Radio Macau but rather Radio Vila Verde.  This shortwave relay was heard during the months of April and May only, and the news report stated that this shortwave relay was simply a temporary fill in while they were awaiting a new mediumwave transmitter.  This shortwave transmitter actually belonged to Radio Macau, not Radio Vila Verde, and apparently its normal usage was for international communication.

Would you believe it?  Again, after another two years, this time during the year 1953, it was stated that no shortwave transmitter in Macau was active with the broadcast of radio programming, and that Radio Club Macau may some time soon take into usage its 1 kW communication transmitter for the relay of their own mediumwave programming.  However, that never eventuated either.  At that stage, a 250 watt mediumwave transmitter was in use on 900 kHz.

Back then, the call signs in use by Radio Club Macau were rather unusual; the shortwave call sign was CR8AA and the medium wave callsign was CR9AA.  The international radio prefix CR8 belonged officially to Goa the Portuguese colony in India; and the international radio prefix CR9 belonged officially to Macau, the Portuguese colony in China.

In the 1960s, the 250 watt mediumwave transmitter was retuned to 1200 kHz, and a new 1 kW mediumwave transmitter took over the 900 kHz channel.  Both channels carried the same programming in parallel in both Cantonese and English.

In 1976, the Radio Macau broadcasting service was reorganized under the auspices of the Information and Tourism Center with programming in just two languages, Chinese and Portuguese.

Interestingly in 1983, two European countries, France and Portugal, announced that they planned to install a jointly operated shortwave broadcast station in Macau, though that project was never implemented either.  The usage of medium wave in Macau was dropped in favor of FM during the 1990s.

With the 1999 re-integration of the Portuguese colony Macau into China looming up on the horizon, Radio Macau again announced that they would re-introduce a shortwave service that would continue on air after the high profile political changeover took place.  However, due to the growth of FM radio broadcasting throughout the world as well as in Macau, the usage of both medium wave and shortwave was dropped entirely.  Thus, over nearly half a century, Radio Macau indicated its intention to increase the power of its international shortwave service on five separate occasions, all without fulfillment. 

These days, Radio TV Macau is on the air via two FM transmitters, each rated at 2½ kW, and they are both on the air 24 hours daily.  The FM channel 100.7 MHz carries Cantonese and Mandarin programming, and the other FM channel 98.0 MHz carries Portuguese programming with occasional inserts in Indonesian and Tagalog.

Coming soon here in Wavescan will be the story of the other radio station in Macau, Radio Vila Verde.
(AWR-Wavescan-NWS 520-10 Feb 2019)

Wednesday, February 13, 2019

What is the Future for VOA on the Island of Tinian?


Super Typhoon Yutu (VOA News)
In our program today, we pick up Part 2 in the radio scene on the Pacific island of Tinian.  Last week, we presented the story of island backgrounds, and we mentioned just a little regarding radio stations on Tinian Island.  This time, we finalize the radio story on Tinian, with the following information regarding the shortwave radio stations on this island.

There is no evidence that an early wireless communication station or a mediumwave broadcasting station was ever installed on the island; no, not under the German administration and not under the Japanese administration, nor under the American.  However in 1944, Japanese forces rapidly strengthened their military presence on the island, and it is obvious that they would have used shortwave radio for distant communication.

American forces took over the island on August 1, 1944 and they then constructed the world’s largest air force base with the presence of 40,000 Americans.  It is obvious again, that the Americans would be using shortwave equipment for communication with airplanes, shipping, and distant headquarters. 

At this stage, the Americans designed the layout of the island similar to the layout of Manhattan Island in New York, even giving the same names to streets and localities as on Manhattan.  These days, the previous airways locality on Tinian is abandoned and inhabited by feral cats and rats.

However during the year 1996, the Voice of America in Washington DC announced that plans were already underway for the construction of a huge shortwave relay station on the island of Tinian.  It was envisaged that this station, on a land estate of 800 acres, would contain six shortwave transmitters at 500 kW each, together with an antenna system comprising seven pairs of curtain antennas. 

Ground work on the new station began in 1996; an experienced company in Kuwait was awarded the contract for the installation of the electronic equipment; the six transmitters would come from a closed shortwave station in Portugal; and the antennas would be installed by Continental-Telefunken.  Programming for the Tinian station would be provided by satellite from the studios of the Voice of America and Radio Free Asia in Washington DC.

The first test broadcasts from VOA Tinian began a little more than two years later on January 5, 1999, when two transmitters were activated at night in order to test for the possibility of arcing problems in the antenna systems.  These two transmitters began regular programming ten days later, on January 15 (1999); by which stage, a third transmitter had already been installed and it too was ready to be activated.

When the Tinian shortwave station was completed, it contained not six transmitters but eight.  There were two Continentals at 250 kW each from the United States, Model 419F2; and six transmitters at 500 kW each from ABB in Switzerland, Model SK552C3P.  These six units had previously been on the air for Radio Liberty and Radio Free Europe in the shortwave relay station at Maxoqueira in Portugal.

The Tinian station was located at the northwestern coast of the island, and the antenna systems were arranged in an arc facing the ocean, and Asia.  A total of eleven curtain antennas were erected, including five pairs of active curtains with passive reflectors.

On October 24 last year (2018), Super Typhoon Yutu, described as the most violent wind storm ever on Earth, struck the island of Tinian and wrought untold havoc and destruction, though fortunately, few lives were lost.  According to VOA station management:   “Both stations (Tinian and Saipan), were completely wiped out.  Antennas mangled, roofs partially torn off, fence lines flattened.  Both sites will be off the air for a minimum of six months, possibly up to a year.”
As a result of the massive destruction wrought by Super Typhoon Yutu, programming from the Voice of America and Radio Free Asia has been farmed out to other available stations that provide shortwave coverage into Asia.

In the December 19 (2018) issue of the America journal, Radio World, writer James Careless provides an update to the Tinian radio scene.  So strong were the winds that the concrete counter-weights on the curtain antennas were literally shaken to pieces.  Feed lines and power lines were  knocked down, and the curtain antennas became a mangled mess.  Satellite dishes were either  fragmented, or blown away.  Fortunately, the transmitters themselves were not damaged, though there has been some water seepage.

In a comment by the well known Dr. Kim Andrew Elliott, he states that it would be wise for the United States to retain the usage of at least one of the two damaged shortwave stations (Tinian or Saipan) for Asian coverage.  However, he added, the cost of rebuilding the stations might mean an opportunity for their permanent closure.  Dr. Elliott is well known for his service in audience research with the Voice of America, his production of the former VOA DX program Shortwave Radiogram, and as an experienced international radio monitor.

So what will happen to the shortwave station on the Island of Tinian?  Will it be restored to active service or is it now gone forever?  Only time will tell.

After a week or two, we plan to begin the very interesting story of the other shortwave station that was destroyed by Super Typhoon Yutu, the VOA relay station on the island of Saipan.
(AWR-Wavescan/NWS 519)

Related article:

Super Typhoon Devastates USAGM Transmission Sites
Yutu scored a direct hit on two islands in the Northern Mariana Islands in October

James Carless, December 20, 2018
Two shortwave radio transmission/antenna farms used by the U.S. Agency for Global Media in Saipan and Tinian were ripped apart by 180 mph winds in October. That’s when Category 5 Super Typhoon Yutu ravaged the Northern Mariana island group in the northwestern Pacific Ocean.

Addtional story at: https://www.radioworld.com/news-and-business/super-typhoon-devastates-usagm-transmission-sites

Radio New Zealand International, winter schedule update


Radio New Zealand International (RNZ Pacific)
Effective: 12 February, 2019


All times UTC

2051-0358 13840 RAN 050 kW / 035 deg to All Pacific English, ex 15720
0359-0458 13840 RAN 050 kW / 035 deg to All Pacific English, ex 13730
0459-0658 11725 RAN 050 kW / 035 deg to All Pacific English, ex 13730
1059-1258 7330*RAN 100 kW / 325 deg to NWPacPNG/As English, ex  9700
* 11-12 co-ch 7330 MOS 100 kW / 283 deg to CeEu German 1st Su R.Joystick
(RNZ)

Monday, February 11, 2019

KNLS stations update their winter schedules

KNLS stations, Madagscar and Alaska have each cut four hours from their current broadcast schedule. Changes are due to the increase in electricity and diesel fuel, causing constant interruptions. The upcoming A-19 summer period from 31 March, will reflect these changes.

All times UTC

Effective: 01 February, 2019
World Christian Broadcast KNLS Madagascar World Voice, Mahajanga
0200-0300 on  6190 MWV 100 kW / 250 deg to SoAm Spanish tx#2 La Voz Alegre
0200-0300 on 15510 MWV 100 kW / 040 deg to SoAs English tx#3 African Pathways Radio
2200-2300 on 11790 MWV 100 kW / 325 deg to NoAf Arabic  tx#2 Radio Feda
2200-2300 on 11965 MWV 100 kW / 055 deg to EaAs Chinese tx#3 The Light of Life

Effective: 01 February, 2019
World Christian Broadcast KNLS The New Life Station, Anchor Point
1600-1700 on  7370 NLS 100 kW / 315 deg to NEAs Russian tx#1 KNLS, New Life Station
1600-1700 on 11965 NLS 100 kW / 300 deg to NEAs Chinese tx#2 The Light of Life
1700-1800 on  7370 NLS 100 kW / 315 deg to NEAs Russian tx#1 KNLS, New Life Station
1700-1800 on 11965 NLS 100 kW / 300 deg to NEAs Chinese tx#2 The Light of Life
(DX Bulgaria 11 Feb 2019)

Weekly Propagation Forecast Bulletins


Product: Weekly Highlights and Forecasts
:Issued: 2019 Feb 11 0402 UTC
# Prepared by the US Dept. of Commerce, NOAA, Space Weather Prediction Center
# Product description and SWPC web contact www.swpc.noaa.gov/content/subscription-services
#
#                Weekly Highlights and Forecasts
#
Highlights of Solar and Geomagnetic Activity 04 - 10 February 2019

Solar activity was at very low levels. There were no numbered sunspot regions. No Earth-directed CMEs were observed in available coronagraph imagery. 

No proton events were observed at geosynchronous orbit.

The greater than 2 MeV electron flux at geosynchronous orbit ranged from moderate to high levels with a peak flux of 8,980 pfu observed on 04 Feb. High levels were observed on 04 Feb as a result of elevated solar wind speeds. Flux levels then ranged from moderate to high levels through 07 Feb under a mostly background solar wind regime, and remained at moderate to high levels through 10 Feb while under weak CH HSS influences. 

Geomagnetic field activity ranged from quiet to active levels. Unsettled periods were observed late in the day on 04 Feb into the first period of 05 Feb as solar wind speeds decreased from around 500 km/s to around 400 km/s under weakening effects from a negative polarity CH HSS. Unsettled conditions were again observed on 06 Feb as a result of minor solar wind enhancements. 

A SSBC on 08 Feb, and marginally elevated solar wind speeds, resulted in active levels the last period of the day. Unsettled levels were observed early on 09 Feb with the onset of an additional negative polarity CH HSS. Quiet to unsettled levels were observed on 10 Feb with ongoing CH HSS influences. 

Forecast of Solar and Geomagnetic Activity 11 February - 09 March 2019

Solar activity is expected to be predominantly at very low levels throughout the forecast period. However, low levels are possible with the return of old Region 2733 (N05, Lo=261) on 12 Feb. This region was very active while transiting the visible disk, and produced a C5 flare at 30/0611 UTC near the west limb, in addition to several other weaker B and C-class flares. 

No proton events are expected at geosynchronous orbit.

The greater than 2 MeV electron flux at geosynchronous orbit is expected to be at moderate to high levels. High levels are expected on 11-12 Feb and 21 Feb-09 Mar. Moderate levels are expected 13-20 Feb. All elevated levels of electron flux are anticipated due to influence from multiple, recurrent CH HSSs. 

Geomagnetic field activity is expected to be mostly unsetted 11-12 Feb as a result of a recurrent, negative polarity CH HSS. G1 (Minor) geomagnetic storming can be expected with a recurrent, positive polarity CH HSS on 19-21 Feb, and also with a recurrent, negative polarity CH HSS on 27-2 Mar. Mostly quiet to unsettled conditions are anticipated with another weaker, recurrent, negative polarity CH HSS on 07-09 Mar. 

Product: 27-day Space Weather Outlook Table 27DO.txt
:Issued: 2019 Feb 11 0402 UTC
# Prepared by the US Dept. of Commerce, NOAA, Space Weather Prediction Center
# Product description and SWPC web contact www.swpc.noaa.gov/content/subscription-services
#
#      27-day Space Weather Outlook Table
#                Issued 2019-02-11
#
#   UTC      Radio Flux   Planetary   Largest
#  Date       10.7 cm      A Index    Kp Index
2019 Feb 11      70           5          2
2019 Feb 12      71           8          3
2019 Feb 13      72           8          3
2019 Feb 14      72           5          2
2019 Feb 15      72           5          2
2019 Feb 16      72           5          2
2019 Feb 17      72           5          2
2019 Feb 18      72           5          2
2019 Feb 19      72          12          4
2019 Feb 20      72          20          5
2019 Feb 21      72          12          4
2019 Feb 22      72           8          3
2019 Feb 23      72           5          2
2019 Feb 24      72           5          2
2019 Feb 25      72           5          2
2019 Feb 26      71           5          2
2019 Feb 27      71          12          4
2019 Feb 28      71          15          5
2019 Mar 01      71          15          5
2019 Mar 02      71          10          4
2019 Mar 03      71           5          2
2019 Mar 04      71           5          2
2019 Mar 05      71           8          3
2019 Mar 06      71           5          2
2019 Mar 07      71           8          3
2019 Mar 08      71          10          4
2019 Mar 09      71           8          3
(NOAA)

Saturday, February 09, 2019

From the Isle of Music & Uncle Bill's Melting Pot schedules, February 10-16



From the Isle of Music, February 10-February 16, 2019:

This week, our guest Erik Alejandro Rodríguez brings the Funk with the music of the sensational group Cimafunk, whose album Terapia was a Cubadisco 2018 nominee. We also listen to some of Moncada En Vivo en el Bule Bar 66, Grupo Moncada's album that won the Tropical Music category in Cubadisco 2018.

The broadcasts take place:

1. For Eastern Europe but audible well beyond the target area in most of the Eastern Hemisphere (kHz, from Kostinbrod, Bulgaria (1800-1900 MSK)

2. For the Americas and parts of Europe, Tuesday 0100-0200 UTC (New UTC) on WBCQ, 7490 KHz from Monticello, ME, USA (Monday 8-9PM EST in the US).

3-4. For Europe and sometimes beyond, Tuesday 1900-2000 UTC and Saturday 1200-1300 UTC (New CETs) on Channel 292, 6070 kHz from Rohrbach, Germany.

Uncle Bill’s Melting Pot, February 10 and 12, 2019:
Episode 99, International Ladies' Night, features female vocalists from the US, Cuba, Malta, Spain and Romania.
The transmissions take place:

1.Sunday 2300-2330 UTC (6:00PM -6:30PM Eastern US) on WBCQ The Planet 7490 kHz from the US to the Americas and parts of Europe

2. Tuesday 2000-2030 UTC on Channel 292, 6070 kHz from Rohrbach, Germany for Europe. If current propagation conditions hold, the broadcast should reach Iceland AND Western Russia due to
a long skip.

Also recommended:
Marion’s Attic, a unique program produced and hosted by Marion Webster featuring early 20th Century records, Edison cylinders etc played on the original equipment, comes on immediately before UBMP on Sundays from 2200-2300 UTC on WBCQ 7490 kHz.

William "Bill" Tilford, Owner/Producer
Tilford Productions, LLC
5713 N. St. Louis Av
Chicago IL 60659-4405
email: bill@tilfordproductions.com
phone: 773.267.6548
website: www.tilfordproductions.com

Friday, February 08, 2019

Shortwave Radiogram weekend schedules


Hello friends,

A reminder that the Winter SWL Fest will be 28 February-2 March at Plymouth Meeting, Pennsylvania (near Philadelphia). Information at swlfest.com. I will be there to demonstrate Shortwave Radiogram.

SSTV will be transmitted this weekend from the International Space Station, from 1400 UTC today (Friday) through Sunday, 10 February, at 1830 UTC. The frequency is 145.8 MHz (FM). The SSTV mode will be PD120. Use MMSSTV or the receive-only RXSSTV or similar software to decode. You can track the location of the ISS here. During these events, I keep a radio tuned to 145.8 MHz FM and MMSSTV running, and periodically check for any results.

Last weekend's experiment with multiple modes, some very fast, via WINB's DRM transmitter was complicated by generally poor conditions. We will transmit the same content today (Friday) at 1500-1530 UTC on 13690 kHz from WINB in Pennsylvania. For details about the program and information about receiving and decoding the WINB DRM broadcast, see this post at swradiogram.net. (Expect the PSK-1000R to fail!)

Also at swradiogram.net is this audio of reception in Alberta of the MFSK32 text, Saturday 1400-1430 UTC, 9400 kHz from Bulgaria.You can decode from this example showing how MFSK32 can communicate even in very difficult conditions.

Videos of last weekend's Shortwave Radiogram (program  ) are provided by youngalientype (not sure of his location) with the first ten minutes of the DRM transmission Friday at 1500 UTC, Scott in Ontario (Friday 2030 UTC),  Ralf in Germany (Saturday 1400 UTC), and a first effort by Adrian in Ireland (Sunday 2330 UTC), battling some heavy noise interference. The audio archive is maintained by Mark in the UK. Analysis is prepared by Roger in Germany.

Shortwave Radiogram this weekend will include a brief segment of Olivia 64-2000. This robust mode might provide a good decode even in very poor conditions, where the MFSK modes are unsuccessful. Examples would include Bulgaria on 9400 kHz direct to North America, and WINB on 9265 in the eastern USA, within the skip zone. Even if you are not hearing or decoding anything else, manually set the mode to Olivia 64-2000 and, at seven minutes into the broadcast, see if there are any results. For best performance, turn the squelch (SQL) off.

Here is the lineup for Shortwave Radiogram, program 86, 8-10 February 2019

 1:40  MFSK32: Program preview
 2:48  Manual vs. automatic transmissions in Switzerland
 7:04  Olivia 64-2000: SWL Fest and ISS SSTV
 9:39  MFSK64: Mars cubesats have gone silent*
13:53  Images of the week*
28:24  MFSK32: Closing announcements

* with image(s)

Please send reception reports to radiogram@verizon.net
And visit http://swradiogram.net
Twitter: @SWRadiogram or https://twitter.com/swradiogram (visit during the weekend to see listeners' results)
Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/567099476753304

Shortwave Radiogram Transmission Schedule
UTC Day UTC Time Frequency Transmitter
Friday 1500-1530 UTC 13690 kHz DRM
special content WINB Pennsylvania
Friday 2030-2100 UTC 7780 kHz WRMI Florida
Saturday 0330-0400 UTC 9265 kHz WINB Pennsylvania
Saturday 1400-1430 UTC 9400 kHz Space Line Bulgaria
Saturday 1830-1900 UTC 9265 kHz WINB Pennsylvania
Sunday 0800-0830 UTC 5850 kHz   7730 kHz  WRMI Florida
Sunday 2330-2400 UTC 7780 kHz WRMI Florida

Slow Scan Radio transmits SSTV images and text modes Saturdays at 1300-1330 UTC on 6070 kHz and 7440 kHz via Channel 292 in Germany -- according to the latest schedule information I have. The website is http://www.slowscanradio.com. Reception reports to x@xdv.me.

The Mighty KBC transmits to Europe Saturdays at 1300-1400 UTC on 11600 kHz from Bulgaria, with the minute of MFSK at about 1330 UTC (if you are outside of Europe, listen via websdr.ewi.utwente.nl:8901/ ). And to North America Sundays at 0000-0200 UTC (Saturday 7-9 pm EST) on 5960 kHz, via Germany. The minute of MFSK is at about 0130 UTC.  Reports to Eric: themightykbc@gmail.com . See also http://www.kbcradio.eu/ and https://www.facebook.com/TheMightyKbc/.

New York and Pennsylvania NBEMS nets. Most weekends, as KD9XB, I check in to the New York NBEMS (Narrow Band Emergency Messaging Software) net Saturday at 1300 UTC on 3584 kHz USB, and the Pennsylvania NBEMS net Sunday at 1300 UTC on 3583 kHz USB. Check-ins are in Thor 22, and messages are in MFSK32. Messages usually use the Flmsg add-on to Fldigi. If you are a radio amateur in eastern North America, feel free to check in. Outside the region, use an SDR in the eastern USA to tune in and decode. You do not need Flmsg to check in, and most of the messages can be read without Flmsg. If you can decode the net, send me an email to radiogram@verizon.net , or tweet to @SWRadiogram , and I will let them know you are tuned in.

Thanks for your reception reports!
Kim
Kim Andrew Elliott, KD9XB
Producer and Presenter
Shortwave Radiogram
Reporting on international broadcasting at https://twitter.com/kaedotcom



Thursday, February 07, 2019

Radio Sputnik Delivers Polished Sound

Russian government station ditches stiff "Radio Moscow" style

James Careless, Feb. 4, 2019
WASHINGTON — Back during the height of the Cold War, international shortwave station Radio Moscow broadcast news, views, and programming to the West; all reflecting the views of the Soviet government that funded its operations. (The same was true for Voice of America, which was and is still funded by the United States government.)

Additional story at: https://www.radioworld.com/news-and-business/radio-sputnik-delivers-polished-sound

Venezuelan forces crack down on media in a bid to keep leadership showdown off airwaves

Juan Guaidó speaks to Venezuelan protest crowd
By Andrew Wight, Medellin

At 8pm on the day Juan Guaidó swore himself in as Venezuela's interim leader, police raided the local television stations of Aventura TV and Global TV in the western oil city of Maracaibo.

More than 20 government officials then took both channels off the air by disconnecting and destroying or seizing all the equipment they could find, according to Julio Reyes, the director of Aventura TV and the digital newspaper noticiaaldia.com.

"The channels received the action in reprisal for the live broadcast [of Guaidó's ceremony] made by Global TV, while noticiaaldia.com received a much stronger and more violent reprisal for the coverage it made of the civic demonstrations in Maracaibo," Reyes told The Telegraph .

Additional story at: The Telegraph https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2019/02/03/venezuela
(photo/U.S. Embassy Uruguay)

VORW Radio International, winter schedule update

VORW Radio International has updated their schedule, including a new broadcasts to Europe

All times UTC / kHz/ // parallel frequency/  target areas

Thursday 1000, 5950 Mexico
Thursday 1000,  6070 // 7440 kHz Western & Central Europe (new broadcast)
Thursday 2000,  7780 Eastern North America
Thursday 2100,  7780 North America and Europe (new broadcast)
Thursday 2300,  9955, South America
Friday 0000, 7730 Western North America
Friday 0100, 5850 // 7780 // 9395 Europe and North America
Friday 0400, 7730 Western North America
Friday 2200, 9955 South America
Saturday 2300, 9395 North America
Sunday 0100, 4840 North America
Sunday 2200, 7570 North America

VORW Radio International is a light-entertainment program which consists of listener requested music of all genres and eras, as well as miscellaneous commentary on various topics. Reception report details may be sent to: vorwinfo@gmail.com

Year of the Pig QSL from Radio Free Asia

                            
RADIO FREE ASIA COMMEMORATES YEAR OF THE PIG

Radio Free Asia (RFA) announces its 2019 Year of the Pig QSL. Those born in a Pig years are considered energetic, positive thinkers and gentle. They are also focused and when they make up their minds to do something, there is evidently little you can do to stop them.  Pigs lead very busy lives and must remember to take breaks in order to rest. Pig years are celebrated every twelfth year. The other Chinese zodiac animals and associated years are Rat, Ox, Tiger, Rabbit, Dragon, Snake, Horse, Goat, Monkey, Rooster and Dog. This is RFA’s 69th QSL design and is used to confirm all valid RFA reception reports from January – April 2019.




RFA’s 2019 Year of the Pig QSL  


Created by Congress in 1994 and incorporated in 1996, RFA broadcasts in Burmese, Cantonese, Khmer, Korean to North Korea, Lao, Mandarin (including the Wu dialect), Vietnamese, Tibetan (Uke, Amdo, and Kham), and Uyghur. RFA strives for accuracy, balance, and fairness in its editorial content. As a ‘surrogate’ broadcaster, RFA provides news and commentary specific to each of its target countries, acting as the free press these countries lack. RFA broadcasts only in local languages and dialects, and most of its broadcasts comprise news of specific local interest.  More information about Radio Free Asia, including our current broadcast frequency schedule, is available at www.rfa.org.

RFA encourages listeners to submit reception reports.  Reception reports are valuable to RFA as they help us evaluate the signal strength and quality of our transmissions.  RFA confirms all accurate reception reports by mailing a QSL card to the listener.  RFA welcomes all reception report submissions at http://techweb.rfa.org (follow the QSL REPORTS link) not only from DX’ers, but also from its general listening audience.

Reception reports are also accepted by email at qsl@rfa.org and by mail to:

          Reception Reports
          Radio Free Asia
          2025 M. Street NW, Suite 300
          Washington DC 20036
          United States of America
(A.J. Janitschek/RFA)

Andrew Janitschek of Radio Free Asia includes, "RFA's mail server will not except attachments file types, like ZIP, EXE, RAR, ISO, CHM, and more. If you go more than one-two months without hearing from us about your reception reports, please do a follow-up and write us at qsl@rfa.org. We are happy to confirm your reception reports, but we all have to work within the limits our system. Thank you for your patience and understanding. "



Wednesday, February 06, 2019

Asian clandestine stations, winter schedule updates








All times UTC/ transmitter sites as indicated

North Korea Reform Radio
Korean
1430-1500  daily 7600as (Dushanbe, Tajikistan)  (ex 7580 (Tashkent, Uzbekistan)
1500-1530  daily 7600as (Dushanbe, Tajikistan)  (ex 7580 (Tashkent, Uzbekistan)
2030-2100  daily 7505as (Dushanbe, Tajikistan) (ex  7495 (Tashkent, Uzbekistan)

Voice of Freedom
Korean
0000-0200  daily 5920as (Hwaseong, Jangan, South Korea) (ex 6045)
0300-0800  daily 5920as (Hwaseong, Jangan, South Korea) (ex 6045)
0900-1400  daily 5920as (Hwaseong, Jangan, South Korea) (ex 6045)
1500-2000  daily 5920as (Hwaseong, Jangan, South Korea) (ex 6045)
2100-0000  daily 5920as (Hwaseong, Jangan, South Korea) (ex 6045)

Voice of the Martyrs Korea
Korean
1530-1600  daily 7520as (Tashkent, Uzbekistan) (ex 7505)
(7520 frequency variable)
(WRTH 04 Feb 2019)

BBC World Service, winter schedule update

BBC World Service
All times UTC / transmitter sites as indicated

Bengali
1330-1400  daily 7520as (Tashkent, Uzbekistan) (ex 5875)

Burmese
1330-1400  daily 9560as (Tinang, Philippines) (ex 5855 Tashkent, Uzbekistan)

Dari
1700-1800  daily 5875as (Gavar, Armenia) (ex 5910)

English
0000-0100  daily 5835as (Gavar, Armenia) (ex 5970)
0100-0200  daily 5835as (Gavar, Armenia) (ex 15510)
2200-2300  daily 5845as (Singapore) (ex 5890)
2300-0000  daily 5845as (Singapore (ex 5890)

Korean
1530-1600  daily 5845as (Singapore) 5895as (Dushanbe, Tajikistan)
1600-1700  daily 5845as (Singapore) 5895as (Dushanbe, Tajikistan)
1700-1800  daily 5845as (Singapore) 5895as (Dushanbe, Tajikistan)
1800-1830  daily 5845as (Singapore) 5895as (Dushanbe, Tajikistan)

Pashto
1800-1900  daily 5875as (gavar, Armenia) (ex 5910)

Somali
(English Premier League football coverage)
1700-1800  Sat 9465af (Meyerton, S Africa) 9600af (United Arab Emirates)
1800-1900  Sat 9465af (Meyerton, S Africa) 9600af (United Arab Emirates)
1900-1930  Sat 9465af (Meyerton, S Africa) 9600af (United Arab Emirates)

Urdu
1500-1600  daily 5830as (Gavar, Armenia) (ex 7300 United Arab Emirates)
(WRTH 04 Feb 2019)

Tuesday, February 05, 2019

USA stations winter schedule updates

All times UTC

USAGM/ Radio Free Asia
Tibetan
1200-1300  daily 13830as (ex 15375)
1300-1400  daily 13830as (ex 15375)

USAGM/ VOA Ashna Radio
Pushto
1630-1700  daily 9975as (ex 9480)
1700-1730  daily 9975as (ex 9480)

USAGM/ Voice of America
English
0300-0400  daily 11925af (ex 15580)
0400-0500  daily 11925af (ex 15580)
1130-1200  daily 11620as (ex 17790)

Tibetan
1400-1500  daily 11760as (ex 17830) 13830 (ex 15160)

KVOH/Voice of Hope
English
1600-2000  Sat 17775ca

Spanish
1500-2000  mtwhf 17775ca
2000-2200  th 17775ca

WHRI/ World Harvest Radio
English/Russian
0300-0400  Sun 7520va (N Amer, Europe)

WRMI/Supreme Master TV http://www.suprememastertv.com 
Winter schedule to 31 March 2019
English/others
0000-0100  daily 5950na
1100-1400  daily 7570va  (N America, Asia)
1400-2000  daily 15770va (Africa, Europe)
2000-2100  daily 5950na 
2100-0000  daily 4980va (Central/S America)

WWRB Morrison, TN
English
0000-0200  sm 3215va (Central/S America)
0200-0500  sm 3185va (Central/N America)
2300-0000  Sat/Sun 3215va (Central/N America)
(times irregular, due to booking arrangements)
(WRTH 04 Feb 2019)

New programming from NEXUS

Nexus International Broadcasting Blog February 3:
The Voice of Love” Christian broadcasts can be heard in English on three different NEXUS-IBA’s channels: daily at 07:15  (Mon-Fri) and 09:00 CET (Sat & Sun) on All Gospel Radio (24/7 radio streaming of Gospel teaching programs, news and Christian music); on Shortwave (each Monday during a series of test broadcasts at 20:00-21:00 CET/19:00-20:00 UTC on 7,290 kHz to Europe, and in parallel on Internet Radio NEXUS (IRN) (24/7 streaming of news, information and Public Access Radio programs).

The mission of the “The Voice of Love” broadcast is to provide a variety of programs, carrying God’s words and Christians’ experiences. The program includes music, testimonies, praising God for those who thirst for the truth. Those listening from any country around the World may seek God’s love and salvation, gain spiritual sustenance and keep far from the evil trends of the world by following God.

Music includes different genres such as Classical, Pop, Rock, Gospel, Country, Folk, World, A Cappella, and Choral music, produced by The Voice of Love.

We welcome any suggestion for this new program. Comments and reception reports will receive a reply directly from the program producers.
If you’d like to get in touch with The Voice of Love, please contact us clicking the button below or email: reports@nexus.org.
https://www.nexus.org/the-voice-of-love-broadcasts-on-egr-irrs-shortwave/
(BDXC)

Voice of Indonesia shortwave schedule


VOI QSL (Gayle Van Horn QSL Collection)
Voice of Indonesia times UTC/all broadcast are irregular

transmitter via Palangkaya

Arabic
1600-1700 3325as

Chinese
1100-1200 3325as
1500-1600 3325as

Dutch
1900-2000 3325as

English
1000-1100 3325as
1300-1400 3325as
2100-2200 3325as

French
2000-2100 3325as

German
1800-1900 3325as

Indonesia
1400-1500 3325as

Japanese
1200-1300 3325as

Spanish
1700-1800 3325as
(WRTH 2019)

KNLS Alaska winter frequency update





a repost for our followers .....

Alaska
 Frequency updates of World Christian Broadcast KNLS - The New Life Station

All times UTC

0800-0900 NF  9610 NLS 100 kW / 285 deg to EaAs Chinese tx#2, ex  7355
0800-0900 NF  9710 NLS 100 kW / 270 deg to SEAs English tx#1, ex  7370
0900-1000 on  7370 NLS 100 kW / 300 deg to NEAs Russian tx#1 unchanged
0900-1000 NF  9610 NLS 100 kW / 285 deg to EaAs Chinese tx#2, ex  7355
1000-1100 NF  9605 NLS 100 kW / 285 deg to EaAs Chinese tx#2, ex  7355
1000-1100 NF  9710 NLS 100 kW / 270 deg to SEAs English tx#1, ex  7370
1100-1200 on  7320 NLS 100 kW / 300 deg to NEAs Russian tx#1 unchanged
1100-1200 NF 11610 NLS 100 kW / 285 deg to EaAs Chinese tx#2, ex  7355
1200-1300 on  7320 NLS 100 kW / 270 deg to SEAs English tx#1 unchanged
1200-1300 on  7355 NLS 100 kW / 270 deg to SEAs English tx#2 unchanged
1300-1400 NF 11785 NLS 100 kW / 300 deg to NEAs Chinese tx#1, ex  7320
1300-1400 NF 11890 NLS 100 kW / 300 deg to NEAs Chinese tx#2, ex  7560
1400-1500 on  7320 NLS 100 kW / 270 deg to SEAs English tx#1 unchanged
1400-1500 NF 11890 NLS 100 kW / 300 deg to NEAs Chinese tx#2, ex  7560
1500-1600 on  7320 NLS 100 kW / 300 deg to NEAs Russian tx#1 unchanged
1500-1600 NF 11890 NLS 100 kW / 300 deg to NEAs Chinese tx#2, ex  7560
1600-1700 on  7370 NLS 100 kW / 315 deg to NEAs Russian tx#1 unchanged
1600-1700 NF 11965 NLS 100 kW / 300 deg to NEAs Chinese tx#2, ex  7340
1700-1800 on  7370 NLS 100 kW / 315 deg to NEAs Russian tx#1 unchanged
1700-1800 NF 11965 NLS 100 kW / 300 deg to NEAs Chinese tx#2, ex  7340
(DX Bulgaria 12 Dec 2018)
(WRTH 04 Feb 2019)

Monday, February 04, 2019

Clandestine stations, winter schedule updates

All broadcast targeted to Eritrea

All times UTC


Radio Erena  http://www.erena.org
Arabic
1730-1800  mwf 9720af (via Sofia, Bulgaria relay)

Tigrinya
1700-1730  daily  9720af (via Sofia, Bulgaria relay)
1730-1800  thas   9720af (via Sofia, Bulgaria relay)


Radio Sinit Eritrea - NEW CLANDESTINE STATION http://www.radiosinit.net
Arabic
0530-0600  Sat 9540af (via Issoudun, France relay)

Tigrinya
0500-0530  Sat 9540af (via Issoudun, France relay)

Sowt Al-Somood (Voce of Steadfastness) former name as Alsmood
Arabic
1520-1600  Sat 17454af (via Issoudun, France relay)

Tigrinya
1500-1520  Sat 17545af (Issoudun, France relay)
(WRTH update 04 Feb 2019))

Radio Habana Cuba, winter schedule update


All times UTC

English
2200-2300  daily 9720af (ex 0000-0100)

French
2100-2130  daily 9720af (ex 2300-2330)

Portuguese
2130-2200  daily 9720af (ex 2330-0000)
2200-2300  daily 9720af (ex 2330-0000)
(WRTH 04 Feb)

Radio Tirana International, winter schedule update


All times UTC
German
1530-1600  daily 3985eu (ex 2030-2100) relayed via SWS-Germany
Italian
1500-1530  mtwhf 3985eu (ex 2130-2200) relayed via SWS-Germany
(WRTH 04 Feb)

World Radio TV Handbook Review-2019


published in the January issue of Spectrum Monitor e-magazine


World Radio TV Handbook 2019 Review
Gayle Van Horn 

The annual release of the World Radio TV Handbook is always an anticipated event for worldwide radio listener’s, both the casual program listener, or an enthusiastic radio aficionado.

This year’s 73rd edition, begins with an editorial and preview by Nicholas Hardyman, Publisher. If you are in the market for a software-defined radio, two receivers will undoubtedly pique your interest. The recent release of WinRadio Excalibur Sigma has been awarded by WRTH as the best and most capable SDR on the market or perhaps the world.

If a budget-friendly hobby is required, consider the SDRPlay RSPDuro.In a lower price class, it was reviewed as a remarkable receiver for its functionality and would represent an excellent choice. Equally impressive is the review of the Airspy HF +, awarded Best Value in an SDR. Additional reviews include the Reuter RDR51 ‘Pocket’ receiver, and XHData D-808, an ‘ultra-portable’ radio, for its low-cost and small size AM and FM portable. Scanner fans in the market for a high-grade wideband hand-held scanning receiver, will find the Icom IC-R30 review, informative and recommended as a good contender to consider.

The Features section begins with HF Curtain Arrays. Written by former BBC Senior Transmitter Engineer, Dave Porter G4OYX, featuring a behind the scenes look at the history and development of classic HF broadcast antennas.

Freelance writer and active radio enthusiast, Hans Johnson, explores two radio stations entitled Broadcasting for Peace. Both stations, Dandal Kura Radio International, and Radio Ndarason International, share their goal to bring programming to a troubled region seeking peace.

YLE foreign news journalist and radio hobbyist Mike Mäkeläläinen, travels to the Marshall Islands national broadcaster, Radio Marshall Islands. The writer shares the latest from V7AB and the station’s future. Though a small station, Radio Marshall Islands transmits a very powerful voice which reaches far beyond the Pacific region.

A major new development in 2018, was the TWR Bonaire inauguration, as the most powerful radio station in the Western Hemisphere. Known as ‘Shine 800,’ the faith-based station broadcast from a new 440 kW transmitter. TWR Broadcast Engineer Dave Pedrsen outlines this massive project in the TWR Bonaire feature.

Closing the features section, is the annual round-up of digital broadcasting. This year’s edition investigates the distinctive characteristics of analogue and digital transmission systems. Predictions are that medium wave and FM broadcasting will remain viable to a world audience.

Ulf-Peter Hoppe, adjunct professor of physics, updates the annual HF Broadcasting Reception Conditions Expected During 2019. His predictions are for a good year of reception on the HF broadcasting bands.

The National Radio section includes domestic radio stations broadcasting to a national listening audience on medium wave, shortwave, FM and DAB. Listings are grouped by country and include frequencies, transmitter information, power kW, contact and website information.

The International Radio list the same information for international broadcasters, airing to a world listening audience.

Clandestine and Other Target Broadcast, cover stations broadcasting politically motivated programming, or those targeted at zones of local or regional conflicts. A one-page listing of Religious Broadcasters Cross Reference Table closes this section.

The Frequency List, includes by-frequency listings of world medium wave stations. SW Stations of the World, is a by-frequency listing of stations, followed by International Broadcasts in English, French, German, Portuguese and Spanish, in a 24-hour UTC format. DRM International Broadcast, are 24-hour UTC listings of worldwide stations airing on DRM. Closing this section is the National Television listing information in country order.

Lastly, this edition contains an extensive Reference section of country indexes and codes, world transmitting sites, radio clubs, organizations and institutes, selected Internet resources, WRTH abbreviations and symbols. Additional information; Transmitter Sites (Location and Decode Tables) for international transmitter sites, Domestic SW Transmitter Sites, and Standard Time & Frequency Transmissions, containing contact information and schedules for worldwide time and frequency stations.

The 73rd edition of World Radio TV Handbook, is a wealth of vital information for any radio or television hobbyist. It remains the most comprehensive exemplary reference book, and a must-have for your listening post. I highly recommend this excellent publication.

World Radio TV Handbook 2019, is available from the WRTH website http://www.wrth.com/

Weekly Propagation Forecast Bulletins


Product: Weekly Highlights and Forecasts
:Issued: 2019 Feb 04 0309 UTC
# Prepared by the US Dept. of Commerce, NOAA, Space Weather Prediction Center
# Product description and SWPC web contact www.swpc.noaa.gov/content/subscription-services
#
#                Weekly Highlights and Forecasts
#
Highlights of Solar and Geomagnetic Activity 28 January - 03 February 2019

Solar activity was at low levels. Region 2733 (N05, Lo=261,  class/area Dso/090 on 27 Jan) produced the strongest flare of the period, a C5 at 30/0611 UTC. The region produced several other weaker B and C-class flares before rotating around the limb on 30 Jan. No Earth-directed CMEs were observed in available coronagraph imagery.

No proton events were observed at geosynchronous orbit.

The greater than 2 MeV electron flux at geosynchronous orbit ranged from normal to high levels. Flux levels decreased from high to normal to moderate levels on 31 Jan through most of 31 Feb due to geomagnetic activity associated with influence from a negative polarity CH HSS. Moderate to high levels were observed for the remainder of the reporting period.

Geomagnetic field activity was ranged from quiet to G1 (Minor) geomagnetic storm levels. Solar wind parameters became enhanced on 31 Jan due to the onset of influence from a negative polarity CH HSS. The passage of the CIR produced sustained southward Bz, with a maximum of -16 nT observed at 31/2026 UTC.

The geomagnetic field responded with an isolated period of G1 (Minor) storm conditions late on 31 Jan. The wind speeds increased to between 550-625 km/s after 01/0920 UTC and persisted until the end of 03 Feb. An accompanying decrease in Bt to between 4-7 nT resulted in a geomagnetic response of quiet to active conditions over 01-03 Feb. The remainder of the reporting period was quiet under nominal solar wind conditions.

Forecast of Solar and Geomagnetic Activity 04 February - 02 March 2019

Solar activity is expected to be at very low levels throughout the forecast period.

No proton events are expected at geosynchronous orbit.

The greater than 2 MeV electron flux at geosynchronous orbit is expected to range from normal to high levels. High levels are expected on 04-10 Feb and 21 Feb - 02 Mar; moderate levels are also expected on 11-13 Feb; mostly normal levels are expected on 14-20 Feb. All elevated levels of the electron flux are anticipated due to influence from multiple, recurrent CH HSSs.

Geomagnetic field activity is expected to range from quiet to G1 (Minor) geomagnetic storm levels. G1 (Minor) conditions are expected on 20 Feb and 28 Feb - 01 Mar; active conditions are expected on 05 Feb, 19 Feb, 21 Feb and 27 Feb; unsettled conditions are expected on 04 Feb, 06 Feb, 22 Feb and 02 Mar.

All enhancements in geomagnetic field conditions are anticipated due to multiple, recurrent CH HSSs. The remainder of the outlook period is expected to be mostly quiet under nominal solar wind conditions.

Product: 27-day Space Weather Outlook Table 27DO.txt
:Issued: 2019 Feb 04 0309 UTC
# Prepared by the US Dept. of Commerce, NOAA, Space Weather Prediction Center
# Product description and SWPC web contact www.swpc.noaa.gov/content/subscription-services
#
#      27-day Space Weather Outlook Table
#                Issued 2019-02-04
#
#   UTC      Radio Flux   Planetary   Largest
#  Date       10.7 cm      A Index    Kp Index
2019 Feb 04      71           8          3
2019 Feb 05      71          12          4
2019 Feb 06      71           8          3
2019 Feb 07      71           5          2
2019 Feb 08      71           5          2
2019 Feb 09      71           5          2
2019 Feb 10      71           5          2
2019 Feb 11      71           5          2
2019 Feb 12      71           5          2
2019 Feb 13      72           5          2
2019 Feb 14      72           5          2
2019 Feb 15      72           5          2
2019 Feb 16      72           5          2
2019 Feb 17      72           5          2
2019 Feb 18      72           5          2
2019 Feb 19      72          12          4
2019 Feb 20      72          20          5
2019 Feb 21      72          12          4
2019 Feb 22      72           8          3
2019 Feb 23      72           5          2
2019 Feb 24      72           5          2
2019 Feb 25      72           5          2
2019 Feb 26      71           5          2
2019 Feb 27      71          12          4
2019 Feb 28      71          15          5
2019 Mar 01      71          15          5
2019 Mar 02      71          10          3
(NOAA)

How Radio Luxembourg Once Ruled the Airwaves

(Gayle Van horn QSL Collection)

Eighty-five years after it first broadcast in English, WILL SIMPSON tells the amazing story of one of the world’s most influential broadcasters.

One of the EU’s six founding members, Luxembourg is best known in 2018 for its low taxes, high finance and for being the home of the European Court of Justice. But for most of the 20th century, its name was synonymous for something far more exciting: broadcasting pop music. In fact, as far as the UK is concerned, the concept was pretty much invented in the Grand Duchy.

The story of Radio Luxembourg starts with a transmitter – a 100 watt one installed by radio pioneers Francois and Marcel Anen at their attic room in Luxembourg City. They used it to broadcast mainly military and orchestral music until in 1929 the Anen brothers jumped into bed with Radio Toulouse to create Compagnie Nationale de Radiodiffusion Luxembourgeoise. When the transmitter was further boosted to 250 watts – enough power to reach the UK – CNRL saw a business opportunity, and a chance to break the BBC’s monopoly, and in 1933 launched an English language service broadcasting popular entertainment over the Channel.

Additional story at: https://www.theneweuropean.co.uk/top-stories/will-simpson-discusses-pop-s-unlikely-pioneer-radio-luxembourg-1-5874151