Monday, September 16, 2019

Weekly Propagation Forecast Bulletins



Product: Weekly Highlights and Forecasts
:Issued: 2019 Sep 16 0139 UTC
# Prepared by the US Dept. of Commerce, NOAA, Space Weather Prediction Center
# Product description and SWPC web contact www.swpc.noaa.gov/content/subscription-services
#
#                Weekly Highlights and Forecasts
#
Highlights of Solar and Geomagnetic Activity 09 - 15 September 2019

Solar activity was at very low levels. No spots were observed on the visible disk. No Earth-directed CMEs were observed in available coronagraph imagery.

No proton events were observed at geosynchronous orbit.

The greater than 2 MeV electron flux at geosynchronous orbit was moderate to high levels were throughout the summary period due to influence from multiple CH HSSs. A maximum flux of 8,450 pfu was observed at 09/1745 UTC.

Geomagnetic field activity ranged from quiet to active levels. An isolated period of active was observed on 09 Sep in response to a positive polarity CH HSS increasing solar wind speeds to ~525 km/s. Isolated unsettled conditions, associated with further enhancements from multiple positive polarity CH HSSs, were observed on 12-15 Sep. Quiet conditions were observed over the remainder of the summary period.

Forecast of Solar and Geomagnetic Activity 16 September - 12 October 2019

Solar activity is expected to be at very low levels over the outlook period.

No proton events are expected at geosynchronous orbit.

The greater than 2 MeV electron flux at geosynchronous orbit is expected to reach high levels on 16-19 Sep and 27 Sep - 12 Oct. Moderate levels are expected from 20-26 Sep. All enhancements in the electron flux are due to elevated wind speeds from multiple, recurrent, CH HSSs.

Geomagnetic field activity is expected to range from quiet to G2 (Moderate) storm levels. The G2 conditions are likely on 27-28 Sep; G1 (Minor) conditions are likely on 29 Sep; active conditions are likely on 30 Sep and 02 Oct; unsettled conditions are likely on 16-18 Sep, 23 Sep, 26 Sep, 01 Oct, 03 Oct, 06 Oct, 10 Oct and 12 Oct. All enhancements in geomagnetic active are in response to the anticipated influence of multiple, recurrent CH HSSs. The remainder of the outlook period is expected to be mostly quiet under nominal solar wind conditions.

Product: 27-day Space Weather Outlook Table 27DO.txt
:Issued: 2019 Sep 16 0139 UTC
# Prepared by the US Dept. of Commerce, NOAA, Space Weather Prediction Center
# Product description and SWPC web contact www.swpc.noaa.gov/content/subscription-services
#
#      27-day Space Weather Outlook Table
#                Issued 2019-09-16
#
#   UTC      Radio Flux   Planetary   Largest
#  Date       10.7 cm      A Index    Kp Index
2019 Sep 16      68           6          3
2019 Sep 17      68           8          3
2019 Sep 18      68          10          3
2019 Sep 19      68           5          2
2019 Sep 20      68           5          2
2019 Sep 21      68           5          2
2019 Sep 22      68           5          2
2019 Sep 23      69           8          3
2019 Sep 24      69           5          2
2019 Sep 25      69           5          2
2019 Sep 26      69          10          3
2019 Sep 27      69          35          6
2019 Sep 28      69          45          6
2019 Sep 29      69          20          5
2019 Sep 30      69          10          4
2019 Oct 01      69           8          3
2019 Oct 02      69          10          4
2019 Oct 03      69           8          3
2019 Oct 04      69           5          2
2019 Oct 05      69           5          2
2019 Oct 06      69          12          3
2019 Oct 07      70           5          2
2019 Oct 08      68           5          2
2019 Oct 09      68           5          2
2019 Oct 10      68           8          3
2019 Oct 11      68           5          2
2019 Oct 12      68           8          3
(NOAA)

Saturday, September 14, 2019

World Music Radio's last broadcast ... for now



In a completely unexpected move, the Danish authorities has withdrawn the permission to use out of band frequencies (on a non interference basis) for World Music Radio (WMR). This means that WMR will be ceasing operations on 5840 and 15805 tomorrow Sunday September 15th 2019 at 2200. WMR may return to shortwave – using frequencies inside the official shortwave bands, but this may take several months.

Current schedule of WMR is:
0000-2400 on 5840 RND 0.1 kW Daily, Sept.15 till 2200
0700-2000 on 15805 RND 0.2 kW Sat/Sun & will be off air! (Stig Hartvig Nielsen-Denmark)

From the Isle of Music & Uncle Bill's Melting Pot schedules, September 15-21


This week we focus on Cuba's urban music with special guests from Zona Franca.
The broadcasts take place:

For Eastern Europe but audible well beyond the target area in most of the Eastern Hemisphere (including parts of East Asia and Oceania) with 100Kw, Sunday 1500-1600 UTC on SpaceLine, 9400 kHz, from Sofia, Bulgaria (1800-1900 MSK)
If you don't have a shortwave radio or are out of range, you can listen live to an uplink from a listening radio in the Netherlands during the broadcast at
http://websdr.ewi.utwente.nl:8901/?tune=9400am

For the Americas and parts of Europe, Tuesday 0000-0100 UTC (New UTC) on WBCQ, 7490 kHz from Monticello, ME, USA (Monday 8-9PM EST in the US).
If you don't have a shortwave or are out of range, you can listen to a live stream from the WBCQ website here (choose 7490)
http://www.wbcq.com/?page_id=7

For Europe and sometimes beyond, Tuesday 1900-2000 UTC and Saturday 1200-1300 UTC on Channel 292, 6070 kHz from Rohrbach, Germany.
If you don't have a shortwave radio or are out of range, you can listen live to an uplink from a listening radio in the Netherlands during the broadcast at
http://websdr.ewi.utwente.nl:8901/?tune=6070am

Uncle Bill's Melting Pot, September 15 and 17:

Episode 130, A Different Kind of Country, presents Country music you will like even if you hate Country music. Trust Uncle Bill on this one.
The transmissions take place:

Sundays 2200-2230 UTC (6:00PM -6:30PM Eastern US) on WBCQ The Planet 7490 kHz from the US to the Americas and parts of Europe
If you don't have a shortwave or are out of range, you can listen to a live stream from the WBCQ website here (choose 7490)
http://www.wbcq.com/?page_id=7

Tuesdays 2000-2030 UTC on Channel 292, 6070 kHz from Rohrbach, Germany for Europe.
If you don't have a shortwave radio or are out of range, you can listen live to an uplink from a listening radio in the Netherlands during the broadcast at
http://websdr.ewi.utwente.nl:8901/?tune=6070am

William "Bill" Tilford, Owner/Producer
Tilford Productions, LLC

Friday, September 13, 2019

Shortwave Radiogram weekend schedules

Hello friends,

Today I had difficulties uploading Shortwave Radiogram to WINB. We will find out at  2330 UTC if the correct program (number 117) is transmitted.

Last weekend's hidden message in Thor Micro at 70 Hz was mostly successful. This weekend, it was my intention to try Throb 1, another very narrow mode, also at 70 Hz, but I could not get a decode from the recording. It seems that Throb 1 does not like the very low audio frequencies. Our hidden message will be in BPSK63F instead, at a center audio frequency of 70 Hz.

A video of last weekend's Shortwave Radiogram (program 116)  is provided by Scott in Ontario (Friday 1300 UTC) (and it is a good example of mostly successful decoding in challenging conditions). The audio archive is maintained by Mark in the UK. Analysis is prepared by Roger in Germany.

This weekend's show is in the usual MFSK32 and MFSK64, with nine images. Also the BPSK63F hidden message.

Here is the lineup for Shortwave Radiogram, program 117, 12-15 September 2019, in modes as noted:

 1:38  MFSK32: Program previoew (now)
 2:46  CPJ's list of 10 most censored countries*
 8:50  MFSK64: Exoplanet in habitable zone has water vapor*
13:34  This week's images*
26:31  MFSK32: Closing announcements
28:17  BPSK63F: "Hidden message" centered on 70 Hz

* with image(s)

Please send reception reports to radiogram@verizon.net
And visit http://swradiogram.net
Twitter: @SWRadiogram or https://twitter.com/swradiogram (visit during the weekend to see listeners' results)
Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/567099476753304

Shortwave Radiogram Transmission Schedule
UTC Day UTC Time Frequency Transmitter
Thursday 2330-2400 UTC 9265 kHz WINB Pennsylvania
Friday 1300-1330 UTC 15770 kHz WRMI Florida
Friday 1500-1530 UTC 15120 kHz DRM WINB Pennsylvania
Saturday 0230-0300 UTC 9265 kHz WINB Pennsylvania
Sunday 0800-0830 UTC 5850 kHz
7730 kHz WRMI Florida
Sunday 2330-2400 UTC 7780 kHz WRMI Florida

The Mighty KBC transmits to North America Sundays at 0000-0200 UTC (Saturday 8-10 pm EDT) on 5960 kHz, via Germany. A minute of MFSK64 is at about 0130 UTC.  Reports to Eric: themightykbc@gmail.com . See also http://www.kbcradio.eu/ and https://www.facebook.com/TheMightyKbc/.

“This is a Music Show” is the newest addition to digital modes via analog shortwave. Most of the show is a music show, but the host transmits some MFSK text and image near the end of the broadcast. It’s transmitted on WRMI, Thursday, 0100-0200 UTC on 5850 kHz, and 0130-0230 UTC on 9395 kHz (Wednesday evening in the Americas). Also look for a waterfall ID at the beginning of the show. thisisamusicshow@gmail.com . www.instagram.com/thisisamusicshow/ www.twitter.com/ThisIsAMusicSho/ or @ThisIsAMusicSho

New York and Pennsylvania NBEMS nets. Most weekends, as KD9XB, I check in to the New York NBEMS (Narrow Band Emergency Messaging Software) net Saturday at 1200 UTC on 3584 kHz USB, and the Pennsylvania NBEMS net Sunday at 1200 UTC on 3583 kHz USB (with out-of-state check-ins now starting at 1130 UTC). Check-ins are usually in Thor 22, and messages are in MFSK32 (PA NBEMS is experimenting with Thor 50x1 for messages). Messages generally use the Flmsg add-on to Fldigi. If you are a radio amateur in eastern North America, feel free to check in. Outside the region, use an SDR in the eastern USA to tune in and decode. You do not need Flmsg to check in, and most of the messages can be read without Flmsg. If you can decode the net, send me an email to radiogram@verizon.net , or tweet to @SWRadiogram , and I will let them know you are tuned in. USEast NBEMS Net: Please also note the USEast NBEMS Net, Wednesdays at 2300 UTC (7 pm EDT) on 3536 kHz USB. I will try to check in to this net more frequently.

Thanks for your reception reports!
Kim

Kim Andrew Elliott, KD9XB
Producer and Presenter
Shortwave Radiogram
Reporting on international broadcasting at https://twitter.com/kaedotcom



Thursday, September 12, 2019

Radio Becomes New Battlefield in Yemen War




Stations attacked and threatened by Houthi rebels as they attempt to influence largely illiterate listenership.


BY JOSHUA HOLMES / THE MEDIA LINE  SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

On a bright January morning, Abbas Al-Akbari, a seasoned producer at Hodeidah Radio, glanced outside his office window and noticed a pick-up truck rapidly approaching his building.

Al-Akbari’s story is far from unusual. As the war in Yemen between a Saudi-led coalition supporting the Yemeni government and Iranian-backed Houthi rebels continues to spiral out of control, a new battlefield has emerged in the war-torn country over the electromagnetic spectrum.

Additional story at The Jerusalem Post: https://www.jpost.com/Middle-East/Radio-becomes-new-battlefield-in-Yemen-war-601371  


Additional Yemen monitoring:
Radio Al-Azm (Saudi Broadcasting Corp.) Schedule in Arabic, 0300-0000 UTC on 11745 kHz. Transmitting via SBC for Saudi military personnel serving in Yemen and Southern Saudi Arabia. Location presumed to be Jeddah, though has not been confirmed.

Republic of Yemen Radio (Radio Sana'a)
Arabic 0300-0000 UTC on 11860 kHz.
Broadcast in support of Yemeni president, and Aden-based provisional government. Possibly produced in state radio studio in Aden or Saudi Arabia, and possibly aired via Saudi Arabian transmitter.

Voice of the Republic
Arabic 1500-0300 UTC on 1170 kHz AM via Yemen. Broadcast times may be variable and are in support of National Resistance Forces (RNF).
(WRTH/Teak Publishing-GRG)

Tuesday, September 10, 2019

Meet the Mosquito Network

Tarawa, Gilbert-Islands WWII 1943 (Brittanica)
Mark Durenberger

Inside the U.S. effort in a battle of the airwaves during the Pacific campaign of World War II

We can’t fully appreciate the importance of news from home to those who served in World War II. In the Pacific campaigns, G.I.s, sailors and Marines fought bloody island-hopping battles; as each island was cleared, garrison troops and hospitals moved in and carried on their own war against mosquitoes, isolation and boredom. The island fighters were fortunate if dated mail caught up with them before they moved on to the next target. Timely personal-level communications were pretty much absent.

Radio programming from America was available but only on shortwave. And shortwave radios were not generally available.

Additional story at Radio World: https://tinyurl.com/y4cf74k7

NOAA Propagation Forecast Bulletins


Product: Weekly Highlights and Forecasts
:Issued: 2019 Sep 09 0301 UTC
# Prepared by the US Dept. of Commerce, NOAA, Space Weather Prediction Center
# Product description and SWPC web contact www.swpc.noaa.gov/content/subscription-services
#
#                Weekly Highlights and Forecasts
#
Highlights of Solar and Geomagnetic Activity 02 - 08 September 2019

Solar activity was at very low levels. Region 2748 (N14, L=205, class/area Hsx/020 on 02 Sep) was quiet and stable and decayed to plage on 03 Sep. No Earth-directed CMEs were observed.

No proton events were observed at geosynchronous orbit.

The greater than 2 MeV electron flux at geosynchronous orbit was at very high levels on 02-04 Sep and high levels on 05-08 Sep. Electron flux reached a maximum of 87,900 pfu at 04/1835 UTC.

Geomagnetic field activity ranged from quiet to G1 (minor) storm levels on 02 Sep due to effects from a large, recurrent, positive polarity CH HSS. From 03-06 Sep, quiet to active levels were observed as HSS effects continued. Quiet to unsettled levels were observed from 07-08 Sep. Wind speeds began the period near 750 km/s, but slowly decayed to end the period near 400 km/s.

Forecast of Solar and Geomagnetic Activity 09 September - 05 October 2019

Solar activity is expected to be at very low levels.

No proton events are expected at geosynchronous orbit.

The greater than 2 MeV electron flux at geosynchronous orbit is expected to be at high levels from 09-13 Sep, and again from 27 Sep - 06 Oct due to HSS effects. Normal to moderate levels are expected on 14-26 Sep.

Geomagnetic field activity is expected to be at mostly quiet levels on 09-26 Sep. Isolated unsettled periods are possible on 23, 26 and 30 Sep, and 01-03 Oct. G1 (minor) to G2 (moderate) geomagnetic storm levels are likely on 27-29 Sep due to positive polarity CH HSS effects.

Product: 27-day Space Weather Outlook Table 27DO.txt
:Issued: 2019 Sep 09 0301 UTC
# Prepared by the US Dept. of Commerce, NOAA, Space Weather Prediction Center
# Product description and SWPC web contact www.swpc.noaa.gov/content/subscription-services
#
#      27-day Space Weather Outlook Table
#                Issued 2019-09-09
#
#   UTC      Radio Flux   Planetary   Largest
#  Date       10.7 cm      A Index    Kp Index
2019 Sep 09      68           5          2
2019 Sep 10      68           5          2
2019 Sep 11      68           5          2
2019 Sep 12      68           5          2
2019 Sep 13      68           5          2
2019 Sep 14      68           5          2
2019 Sep 15      68           5          2
2019 Sep 16      68           5          2
2019 Sep 17      68           5          2
2019 Sep 18      68           5          2
2019 Sep 19      68           5          2
2019 Sep 20      68           5          2
2019 Sep 21      68           5          2
2019 Sep 22      68           5          2
2019 Sep 23      69           8          3
2019 Sep 24      69           5          2
2019 Sep 25      69           5          2
2019 Sep 26      69          10          3
2019 Sep 27      69          35          6
2019 Sep 28      69          45          6
2019 Sep 29      69          20          5
2019 Sep 30      69          10          4
2019 Oct 01      69           8          3
2019 Oct 02      69          10          4
2019 Oct 03      69           8          3
2019 Oct 04      69           5          2
2019 Oct 05      69           5          2
(NOAA)

Saturday, September 07, 2019

Australian Shortwave Callsign VLR


Throughout the entire one and a quarter centuries of wireless and radio history, there have ever been only two stations that have been allotted the callsign VLR.  The first application of the call VLR was for the communication transmitter aboard a small passenger/cargo ship in the waters off New Zealand, and the second application of the callsign VLR was for the  the internationally well known low power shortwave service operated by the ABC and Radio Australia at Lyndhurst in Victoria.

The SS Marama was built at Greenock in Scotland and it was launched in 1907.  During its 30 years of international ocean going service, it was in use for the TransTasman route between New Zealand and Australia, and in the TransPacific service between New Zealand and North America.

The normal peacetime service of the SS Marama was interrupted for a period of four years during World War 1 while it was in use as New Zealand’s second Hospital Ship for soldiers wounded on service in Europe.  On one occasion, the Marama was accosted by a German submarine in the North Atlantic, but as a hospital ship it was permitted to move on unmolested.

The Marama was laid up at Evans Bay, Wellington in 1936, and next year it was sold to China, and then sold again, this time to Japan at a nice profit.  It was broken up at Osaka in Japan during the year 1938.

During the early 1920s, the callsign aboard the Marama was VLR, and this callsign was modified to ZLR on January 1, 1929 due to new international radio regulations.  During the 1930s, there were times when a daily newspaper was published aboard the Marama with news taken from various radio sources.  This daily newspaper was given the appropriate though rather unimaginative title, Daily News.

The original VLR shortwave station in Australia was born in a galvanized iron shed on top of a low rise near Lyndhurst some 25 miles southeast of Melbourne in Victoria, in 1928.  Back then, this locally made 600 watt transmitter was operated experimentally without callsign on 5800 kHz.  However, due to the fact that the audio source for this little new shortwave transmitter was taken from the two mediumwave stations in Melbourne, 3LO & 3AR, then the shortwave unit was soon afterwards given a sort of combined call 3LR.

Due to a change in international radio regulations, amateur stations in Australia were required to add the prefix VK to their callsigns, by December 31, 1928.  In order to ensure the change of callsign throughout Australia by the effective date, the Chief Radio Inspector Mr Jim Malone authorized the usage of the new VK prefix from December 8 onwards.  That was for all amateur radio stations.

However, mediumwave broadcasting stations in Australia never did use a prefix, just a single digit number identifying the state, followed by two letters identifying an individual station.  But, the radio relay station at Lyndhurst was an anomaly, it was neither an amateur station nor a mediumwave broadcasting station.  According to the QSL cards that were issued during that era, the accepted callsign for Lyndhurst shortwave was simply 3LR.   In this way, it was treated as a broadcasting station.

During the year 1934, a new building was constructed adjacent to the old original shack at Lyndhurst, and on  March 12, shortwave 3LR began a regular relay of programming for the benefit of people living in Australia’s isolated outback areas.  At this stage, the transmitter was still operating at just 600 watts and the usual channel was 9580 kHz.  The regular broadcast antenna was a horizontal half wave doublet at 95½ degrees from true north, with a radiation lobe towards the great outback.

Back during this era, the Lyndhurst transmitter with its programming relay from 3LO and 3AR was identified officially and unofficially as both 3LR and VK3LR.  In experimental usage though, the allotted callsign was VK3XX, with the X following the American pattern identifying an experimental station.  In May 1935, the 600 watt transmitter was engineered to operate then at 1 kW.

Around June 1936, transmitter (VK)3LR began to carry an experimental 10 minute bulletin of news twice weekly in French for the benefit of French islands in the South Pacific.  This genuine overseas foreign language service, though quite short in duration, was a forerunner to the inauguration of Australia Calling/Radio Australia three years later.  The French Consul-General in Sydney made request for the continuity of this French language service. 

In 1937, the Lyndhurst transmitter was completely reconditioned and the power rating was increased to 2 kW, though still with the same original transmitter.  Soon afterwards, the power level was again increased, this time to 5 kW.

At this stage, the lonely little shortwave transmitter at Lyndhurst now radiated through two antenna systems as needed; for national coverage through the same horizontal doublet, and for international coverage, a rhombic beamed on Daventry in England.  December 1 (1937) was the official date for the regularization of the callsign from (VK)3LR to the now more familiar VLR.
More about VLR next time.
(Jeff white, Adrian Peterson-AWR Wavescan 547)

From the Isle of Music & Uncle Bill's Melting Pot schedules - September 8-14



From the Isle of Music, September 8-14:
This week our special guests are members of Grupo Canela, which celebrated its 30th Anniversary in August. We also present a portion of a new recording by Legendarios del Guajirito.

The broadcasts take place:
For Eastern Europe but audible well beyond the target area in most of the Eastern Hemisphere (including parts of East Asia and Oceania) with 100Kw, Sunday 1500-1600 UTC on SpaceLine, 9400 kHz, from Sofia, Bulgaria (1800-1900 MSK) If you don't have a shortwave radio or are out of range, you can listen live to an uplink from a listening radio in the Netherlands during the broadcast at
http://websdr.ewi.utwente.nl:8901/?tune=9400am

For the Americas and parts of Europe, Tuesday 0000-0100 UTC (New UTC) on WBCQ, 7490 kHz from Monticello, ME, USA (Monday 8-9PM EST in the US). If you don't have a shortwave or are out of range, you can listen to a live stream from the WBCQ website here (choose 7490)
http://www.wbcq.com/?page_id=7

For Europe and sometimes beyond, Tuesday 1900-2000 UTC and Saturday 1200-1300 UTC on Channel 292, 6070 KHz from Rohrbach, Germany. If you don't have a shortwave radio or are out of range, you can listen live to an uplink from a listening radio in the Netherlands during the broadcast at http://websdr.ewi.utwente.nl:8901/?tune=6070am

Uncle Bill's Melting Pot, September 8 and 10:
The broadcasts take place:

Sundays 2200-2230 UTC (6:00PM -6:30PM Eastern US) on WBCQ The Planet 7490kKHz from the US to the Americas and parts of Europe. If you don't have a shortwave or are out of range, you can listen to a live stream from the WBCQ website here (choose 7490)
http://www.wbcq.com/?page_id=7

Tuesdays 2000-2030 UTC on Channel 292, 6070 kHz from Rohrbach, Germany for Europe.
If you don't have a shortwave radio or are out of range, you can listen live to an uplink from a listening radio in the Netherlands during the broadcast at  http://websdr.ewi.utwente.nl:8901/?tune=6070am
William "Bill" Tilford, Owner/Producer
Tilford Productions, LLC

Friday, September 06, 2019

U.S.-Based Shortwave Broadcasters Eye Digital

Group seeks a path to “affordable, distributable” DRM receivers

JAMES CARELESS, 26 August 2019
Relatively few Americans are aware of it, but the United States is home to many ommercial/religious international broadcasters that transmit programming worldwide using analog shortwave radio transmitters. They are supported by an industry group called the National Association of Shortwave Broadcasters.

Unfortunately, analog shortwave radio transmissions are notorious for interference and signal dropouts. For listeners in other countries, the sound coming out of their shortwave radios lacks the superior audio range of domestic U.S. AM (yes, we said AM) and is often wracked with static and signal fading.

Additional story at Radio World: https://tinyurl.com/yxke6rke

The Early Wireless Scene in South American Uruguay

SODRE Uruguay QSL
In our Wavescan program today, we honor the Montevideo DX Group in Uruguay, and we begin a two or three part topic on the story of radio broadcasting in their country.

The South American country of Uruguay is located on the Atlantic seaboard, and it is sandwiched between Brazil and Argentina. It is the third smallest territory in South America, with an area of 68,000 square miles and a population of three and a half million people.  This country has a coastline of about 400 miles and it stretches inland about the same distance.

Their capital city is Montevideo, meaning approximately “Mountain View”, and it is the third most southerly capital city in the world.  Only Canberra in Australia, and Wellington in New Zealand reach further south than Montevideo. There is at least one question that people living in other parts of the world would ask regarding this area in South America, and that is: Why the similarity in name between Paraguay and Uruguay? 

According to the authorities, both names, Paraguay and Uruguay, are variations of the original local language, Guarani.  The meanings of the two country names can be described as follows:-

Paraguay = River of the Guarani people
Uruguay = Colorful water bird of the Guarani people

In the pre-colonial days, South American native tribes lived in what is now called Uruguay, and the Spanish and the Portuguese were the first Europeans to visit the area, in the early 1500s. Uruguay has endured a turbulent past, and it established its own independence in 1825. Both Spanish and Guarani are the official languages of Uruguay, though Spanish is the preferred language of business and government.

Soon after the beginning of World War 2, Uruguay came into prominence during the high profile events associated with the German battleship Graf Spee. Just a dozen weeks into the war, the Graf Spee was wounded in battle against British warships in the South Atlantic, and so this pride of the German Kriegsmarine sought shelter in the harbor at Montevideo, in neutral Uruguay.

Radio broadcasts from the British navy indicated, falsely, that British navy vessels were stationed in international waters outside Montevideo, ready to sink the Graf Spee should she venture out into the Atlantic.  A radio message from Berlin gave Captain Hans Langsdorff two options; either flee across La Plata Estuary to nearby Buenos Aires, or scuttle in the estuary itself.  He chose the latter, and exactly one week before Christmas 1939, to avoid capture, the Graf Spee was deliberately sunk, with all crew ashore. 

As was the case with many other countries around the world, Uruguay began the installation of wireless stations in the early 1900s, now more than one hundred years ago.  On November 12, 1904, the government of Uruguay gave formal approval for the installation of a German coastal wireless station at Punta Yeguas, on the edge of La Plata Estuary, a little west of Montevideo. 

Construction work was completed two years later (1906), and a new 1 kW Telefunken wireless transmitter was taken into Morse Code service under the callsign MV, obviously identifying Montevideo.  Subsequently, this callsign was modified with an initial letter U standing for Uruguay, and callsign MV became UMV.

Not to be outdone by their German competitors, the English Marconi company installed their own wireless station at Punte del Este, a very small peninsula some 80 miles east of the capital city Montevideo.  This new wireless station, also with a power of 1 kW, was inaugurated three years later in 1909, under the callsign MO, also obviously identifying Montevideo. 

It was the custom of the Marconi company back at that stage to choose the first and the last letters of the location of a land based station as the station callsign.  However subsequently, the Marconi company required all of their stations worldwide to insert an M as the first letter of their callsigns, and thus station MO Montevideo became MMO.

During the middle of the year 1912, a new government wireless station on a large 10 acre property near Cerrito Montevideo was taken into regular service under the callsign CWA.  This new coastal wireless station CWA replaced both the German Telefunken station UMV at Punta Yeguas and the English Marconi station MMO at Punta del Este.   

This station was licensed also for additional subsidiary callsigns, one for each shortwave channel.  These callsigns descended in alphabetic order; CWA, CWB, CWC, CWD, etc.

The well known international radio monitor Horacio A. Nigro of Montevideo provides detailed information about the new government operated CWA. Several new buildings were erected for this new coastal wireless station; the 2½ kW longwave spark transmitter was also made by Telefunken in Germany; the two steel antenna towers stood 200 feet tall and they were spaced 325 ft apart; the four phosphor bronze antenna wires were m
ore than one inch thick; and there was a counterpoise earthing system just above ground level. 

The main power source was provided by the city electricity company, though there was also a backup generator system.  The receiver was a new complicated uptodate version of what was originally a simple crystal set receiver.

Back during this original wireless era, several additional wireless stations were installed at various locations throughout Uruguay, including at lighthouses, as well as at inland locations.  In addition, some of the lower powered wireless stations were mobile units that could be installed wherever a temporary location was needed.

The long time coastal wireless station CWA in Uruguay dates its earliest origins back to the year 1904, and 115 years later, after several modernizations and periodic updates, this station is still on the air to this day, and still under its original callsign CWA.

More about the radio scene in Uruguay next time.
(Jeff White/Adrian Peterson-AWR/Wavescan-NWS 547)

Uruguayan stations in the Global Radio Guide-Summer 2019
Radio Carve 850 kHz AM 24hrs http://www.carve850.com.uy/
Radio Clasica 650 kHz AM 24 hrs http://www.clasica.uy/
Radio Oriental 770 kHz AM 24 hrs http://www.oriental770.com/
Radio Rural 610 kHz AM 24 hrs http://www.radiorural.uy/
Radio Tacuarembo 1280 kHz AM 24 hrs http://emisorastacuarembo.com/
(Gayle Van Horn/Teak Publishing)

BBC frequency updates freqs for English and French



BBC World Service

All times UTC

English
2200-2300 7445*SLA 250 kW / 105 deg to SEAs  ex 6115 SLA from Aug.28

French
0600-0630 12030 SAO 100 kW / 088 deg to CeAf ex 7305 ASC from Sept.2
2200-2300 7445*SLA 250 kW / 105 deg to SEAs English, ex 6115 SLA from Aug.28
*to avoid on  6115 WWCR 100 kW / 046 deg to ENAm English WWCR-1 traditional freq
(DXB 06 Sept 2019)

KTWR updates their DRM schedule

KTWR transmitters, Guam
Hi Everyone,

                Based on comments received from listeners, KTWR will be modifying its DRM broadcast schedule as follows:

Effective 12 Sep.
                The 11995kHz 1026-1056 UTC Thursday broadcast to Japan/SK will be changed to 9900kHz 1215-1245UTC on Thursday.

Effective 15 Sep.
                The 11580kHz 1215-1245 UTC Monday broadcast to South Asia will be changed to 15200kHz 1026-1056UTC on Sunday.

                The 11995kHz 1026-1056 UTC Wednesday broadcast to China will be unchanged.
                The 11995kHz 1025-1056 UTC Tuesday broadcast to Australia will remain suspended.
(Mike Sabin/TWR)

Free Radio Service Holland to repeat Anniversary broadcast


FRS will be on air Sunday 08 September, 2019, repeating the 29th Anniversary program, on 5810 kHz between 1700 to 2100 UTC, 1900 to 2300 CEST.

News from the station;
"Unfortunately we haven't been very lucky with our evening broadcasts this summer. Next Sunday there will be a repeat of our 39th Anniversary broadcast from last Sunday on 5810 kHz between 19-23 CEST.
Keep on writing and supporting Free Radio on short wave!

73s 
Peter Verbruggen

To learn more about FRS Holland, visit their website at:
http://www.frsholland.nl/

RTÉ begins maintenance service

Fine Gael
By Hildegarde Naughton TD
4th September 2019 

Works have begun today to help ensure the continuance of RTÉ’s longwave radio service for a minimum of two years, a Fine Gael TD has said.

Deputy Hildegarde Naughton, Chair of the Oireachtas Communications Committee, said: “I have received confirmation from the national broadcaster that works have begun today on elements of the transmission equipment which will help ensure the continuance of the longwave service for a minimum of a further two years.

“The maintenance of long wave radio for the Irish diaspora has been a significant concern to the Committee.

“Earlier this year, RTÉ committed to maintaining the service following engagement with the Committee and I am pleased that listeners abroad can now be assured that service will continue for a minimum of two years.”

Deputy Naughton continued: “While other long term alternative solutions continue to be explored, RTÉ has to undertake significant remedial works on elements of the transmission equipment, mainly the antenna/mast.

“Given the height of the mast this work has to happen now in advance of the winter. To facilitate this essential maintenance, and to ensure the safety of those undertaking the work, service was suspended for a time today and will be suspended again tomorrow, Thursday, from 9.30am until 4.30pm.

“This initial outage is to facilitate the preparatory work for a subsequent, more extensive and essential body of work to maintain this service.

“This larger body of maintenance work will be carried out between Tuesday 10th September and Thursday 17th October.“During both of these times, RTÉ Radio 1 will not be available via LW, however listeners will be advised of the various alternatives available such as listening via apps and television while the usual service is off air.”

Deputy Naughton concluded: “I welcome the efforts being made to continue this service, which serves as an invaluable link between the diaspora and home.

“However I intend to work with the committee to explore other longer term alternative solutions to ensure this service continues in the long term.

https://www.finegael.ie/works-to-maintain-longwave-radio-service-begin-today-naughton/
(BDXC)

Pyongyang Blasting away on 6400 kHz

Image result for north korea pink lady annouc=ncer



Pyongyang BS on 6400 kHz blasting away with female announcer delivering the NOKO party line on relations with the US in Korean and military instrumental marshal music at 1230 UTC.

Radiogram 5 September Intercept

Marco in Italy has tweeted the first images of this week's Radiogram broadcast on his twitter feed.


MFSK images @SWRadiogram #116, 9265 KHz, 5 Sep 2019, 23:30z.
Reception during a strong thunderstorm with huge statics in JN53 with Airspy HF+, SDR#, Audio Cable, FLDIGI. Text / images, Thor Micro @ 70 Hz was good. Good signal from @SWWINB, Red Lion, Pennsylvania, USA.

Shortwave Radiogram, 5-8 September 2019



Hello friends,

We are happy to know that WRMI in Okeechobee, Florida, was spared a direct hit by Hurricane Dorian. The Shortwave Radiogram schedule should, therefore, proceed as normal. WRMI was not entirely unscathed, having experienced some internet disruptions. Good luck to those still in the path of Dorian.

Last week's hidden message exercise, with BPSK63F at 95, 85, 75 and 65 Hz, was fun. Most of us had trouble with the 65 Hz message, but there were a few perfect decodes of all four.

Videos of last weekend's Shortwave Radiogram (program 115) are provided by Scott in Ontario (Friday 1300 UTC) (You can try to decode the hidden message from his video) and by MD2 in Colorado (excerpt of Sunday 0800 UTC on 5850 kHz; the audio sounds like unrelated FT8).  The audio archive is maintained by Mark in the UK. Analysis is prepared by Roger in Germany.

This weekend's hidden message will be in Thor Micro at 70 Hz. There is no RSID for Thor Micro, so be prepared to change the mode and audio frequency manually as soon as the final MFSK32 ends. Thor Micro is a very slow mode. You will not see text until a few seconds after you see the Thor Micro trace down at 70 Hz. 

This weekend's show is in the usual MFSK32 and MFSK64 with nine images, plus the Thor Micro.

Here is the lineup for Shortwave Radiogram, program 116, 5-9 September 2019, in modes as noted:

 1:40  MFSK32: Program preview
 2:48  Undersea sensor powered by sound waves from the surface
 6:27  MFSK64: Will EVs disrupt Germany's power grid?*
11:23  This week's images*
25:42  MFSK32: Closing announcements
27:15  Thor Micro: Hidden message centered on 70 Hz
* with image(s)

Please send reception reports to radiogram@verizon.net

And visit http://swradiogram.net

Twitter: @SWRadiogram or https://twitter.com/swradiogram (visit during the 
weekend to see listeners' results)

Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/567099476753304

Shortwave Radiogram Transmission Schedule
UTC Day UTC Time-Frequency Transmitter

Thursday 2330-2400 UTC 9265 kHz WINB Pennsylvania
Friday 1300-1330 UTC 15770 kHz WRMI Florida
Friday 1500-1530 UTC 15120 kHz DRM WINB Pennsylvania
Saturday 0230-0300 UTC 9265 kHz WINB Pennsylvania
Sunday 0800-0830 UTC 5850 kHz, 7730 kHz WRMI Florida
Sunday 2330-2400 UTC 7780 kHz WRMI Florida

The Mighty KBC transmits to North America Sundays at 0000-0200 UTC (Saturday 8-10 pm EDT) on new 5960 kHz, via Germany. A minute of MFSK is at about 0130 UTC.  Reports to Eric: themightykbc@gmail.com . See also http://www.kbcradio.eu/ and https://www.facebook.com/TheMightyKbc/. 

“This is a Music Show” is the newest addition to digital modes via analog shortwave. Most of the show is a music show, but the host transmits some MFSK text and image near the end of the broadcast. It’s transmitted Thursday at 0100-0200 on 5850 kHz and 0130-0230 on 9395 kHz (Wednesday evening in the Americas), both from WRMI Florida. Also look for a waterfall ID at the beginning of the show. thisisamusicshow@gmail.com . www.instagram.com/thisisamusicshow/ www.twitter.com/ThisIsAMusicSho/ or @ThisIsAMusicSho

New York and Pennsylvania NBEMS nets. Most weekends, as KD9XB, I check in to the New York NBEMS (Narrow Band Emergency Messaging Software) net Saturday at 1200 UTC on 3584 kHz USB, and the Pennsylvania NBEMS net Sunday at 1200 UTC on 3583 kHz USB (with out-of-state check-ins now starting at 1130 UTC). Check-ins are usually in Thor 22, and messages are in MFSK32 (PA NBEMS is experimenting with Thor 50x1 for messages). Messages generally use the Flmsg add-on to Fldigi. If you are a radio amateur in eastern North America, feel free to check in. Outside the region, use an SDR in the eastern USA to tune in and decode. You do not need Flmsg to check in, and most of the messages can be read without Flmsg. If you can decode the net, send me an email to radiogram@verizon.net , or tweet to @SWRadiogram , and I will let them know you are tuned in. USEast NBEMS Net: Please also note the USEast NBEMS Net, Wednesdays at 2300 UTC (7 pm EDT) on 3536 kHz USB. I will try to check in to this net more frequently.

Thanks for your reception reports!

Kim

Kim Andrew Elliott, KD9XB
Producer and Presenter
Shortwave Radiogram

Reporting on international broadcasting at https://twitter.com/kaedotcom

Three images get the shortwave artistic treatment. From the show 1 September. 2330-2400 UTC, 7780 kHz from WRMI Florida, as decoded by Al in the northern Florida skip zone