Tuesday, April 20, 2021

Radio Free Asia Announces Tokyo 2020 QSL

 

MAY 2021
Radio Free Asia (RFA) announces its 76th QSL card. This latest design commemorates the 2020 Summer Olympic Games in Tokyo, Japan rescheduled to July 23 – August 8, 2021, due to last year’s global pandemic. 

The Games always bring people together from around the world in peace and harmony to respect universal moral principles. This design is an adaptation of RFA’s first panda design originally used for the 2008 Beijing Olympics. This updated version of the original design adds the national flag of Japan as it waves in the breeze. This QSL card all valid reception reports from May-August 2021.

RFA’s Tokyo 2020 Summer Olympics QSL  



Created by Congress in 1994 and incorporated in 1996, RFA broadcasts in Burmese, Cantonese, Khmer, Korean to North Korea, Lao, Mandarin Chinese, Vietnamese, Tibetan (including Uke, Amdo, and Kham dialects), and Uyghur. RFA strives for accuracy, balance, and fairness in our editorial content. As a ‘surrogate’ broadcaster, RFA provides news and commentary specific to each of our target countries, acting as the free press these countries lack. RFA broadcasts only in local languages and dialects, and most of our broadcasts comprise news of specific local interest.  More information about RFA, including our current broadcast frequency schedule, is always available at www.rfa.org.

RFA encourages listeners to submit reception reports.  Reception reports are valuable to RFA as they help us evaluate the signal strength and quality of our transmissions.  RFA confirms all accurate reception reports by mailing a QSL card to the listener.  RFA welcomes all reception report submissions at http://techweb.rfa.org (follow the QSL REPORTS link) not only from DX’ers but also from our general listening audience.

Reception reports are also accepted by email at qsl@rfa.org and by mail to:

Reception Reports
Radio Free Asia
2025 M. Street NW, Suite 300
Washington DC 20036
United States of America

Weekly Propagation Forecast Bulletins

 


Product: Weekly Highlights and Forecasts
:Issued: 2021 Apr 19 0151 UTC
# Prepared by the US Dept. of Commerce, NOAA, Space Weather Prediction Center
# Product description and SWPC web contact www.swpc.noaa.gov/content/subscription-services
#
#                Weekly Highlights and Forecasts
#
Highlights of Solar and Geomagnetic Activity 12 - 18 April 2021

Solar activity was very low throughout the period with B-class flare activity observed from Rgn 2814 (S22, L=008, class/area Cro/090 on 14 Apr), Rgn 2815 (S21, L=344, class/area Bxo/010 on 16 Apr) and Rgn 2816 (S24, L=264, class/area Cao/080 on 16 Apr). The largest event of the period was a B9 x-ray event observed at 17/1717 UTC from a region beyond the ESE limb. Associated with this event was a Type II radio signature with an estimated shock velocity of 382 km/s and a slow-moving, non-Earth directed CME off the E limb. 

No proton events were observed at geosynchronous orbit.

The greater than 2 MeV electron flux at geosynchronous orbit was at moderate levels on 12-16 Apr. High levels were observed on 17-18 Apr with a maximum flux reading of 14,078 pfu at 18/1905 UTC. 

Geomagnetic field activity was at mostly quiet levels on 12-14 Apr with an isolated active period observed late on the 14th. Unsettled to G1 (minor) geomagnetic storm levels were reached early on 15 Apr due to possible effects from the 10 Apr CME. Mostly unsettled to active levels were observed on 16-18 Apr, with G1 (Minor) storm levels observed on 16 and 17 Apr. This activity was all due to recurrent, negative polarity CH HSS influence. During this activity, wind speeds reached 600 km/s, the total field reached maximums of 13 nT and the Bz component reached -10 nT at times. 


Forecast of Solar and Geomagnetic Activity 19 April - 15 May 2021

Solar activity is expected to be at very low levels during the outlook period. 

No proton events are expected at geosynchronous orbit.

The greater than 2 MeV electron flux at geosynchronous orbit is expected to reach high levels on 19-24 Apr and 13-15 May due to high-speed solar winds. Normal to moderate levels are anticipated for 25-30 Apr and 01-12 May. 

Geomagnetic field activity is expected to be at unsettled to active levels on 19-20 Apr, 23-24 Apr, 27-28 Apr, 04 May, 08 May and 11-15 May, with G1 (Minor) geomagnetic storm levels likely on 13-14 May. This activity is all due to recurrent CH HSS influence. Mostly quiet levels are expected for the remainder of the outlook period. 

Product: 27-day Space Weather Outlook Table 27DO.txt
:Issued: 2021 Apr 19 0151 UTC
# Prepared by the US Dept. of Commerce, NOAA, Space Weather Prediction Center
# Product description and SWPC web contact www.swpc.noaa.gov/content/subscription-services
#
#      27-day Space Weather Outlook Table
#                Issued 2021-04-19
#
#   UTC      Radio Flux   Planetary   Largest
#  Date       10.7 cm      A Index    Kp Index
2021 Apr 19      78          12          4
2021 Apr 20      75           8          3
2021 Apr 21      75           5          2
2021 Apr 22      72           5          2
2021 Apr 23      70           8          3
2021 Apr 24      70          12          4
2021 Apr 25      70           5          2
2021 Apr 26      70           5          2
2021 Apr 27      68          10          3
2021 Apr 28      68           8          3
2021 Apr 29      68           5          2
2021 Apr 30      68           5          2
2021 May 01      68           5          2
2021 May 02      68           5          2
2021 May 03      70           5          2
2021 May 04      72          15          4
2021 May 05      72           5          2
2021 May 06      72           5          2
2021 May 07      72           5          2
2021 May 08      72           8          3
2021 May 09      72           5          2
2021 May 10      75           5          2
2021 May 11      75           8          3
2021 May 12      75          12          4
2021 May 13      75          20          5
2021 May 14      75          30          5
2021 May 15      75          15          4
(NOAA)

Saturday, April 17, 2021

What Else Do We Know About Radio Nepal?

 


Their Venture into the Guinness Book of World Records.

Before we begin this another story about Radio Nepal in our program today, we present an item of international interest regarding Mt. Everest.  During the month of December (2020), Nepal and China issued a joint news release indicating that Mt Everest is now 13 feet taller than it was before.

As a result of discussions between the governments of China and Nepal, both countries have agreed that the official height of Mt. Everest is now 29,031 ft 8½ inches.  The reason, they state, why Mt. Everest is now taller than it was before, is because the rocks, snow and ice on the top of the mountain are now included in the total figure.  

The opening music in our program today was recorded in one day in a Kathmandu studio of Radio Nepal on Thursday, May 19, 2016.  A total of 365 singers were organized into 26 groups representing all areas of the Natural Environment, and they sang the song Melancholy in the Nepali language.  The 365 singers represented one per day for a whole year, and the 26 categories in the Natural Environment represented one for each letter in the English alphabet.  

The words and music for the song Melancholy were composed by Nipesh Dhaka and the day's events were inaugurated by Prime Minister Khadga Prasad Oli.  This musical event, which was specifically planned as a world-first for Guinness World Records, began at 8:00 am and concluded at 6:00 pm.  

The total duration of the assembled recording lasts for 33 minutes and 49 seconds.  The version we presented at the opening of this edition of Wavescan was specially shortened for use as an introduction.  Two years after the recording was made (2018), Guinness World Records officially accepted Melancholy from Radio Nepal as the most soloists in a single song recorded in the one day.

The original studio building (1951) for Radio Nepal was a two-storey building in the Royal Campus at Singha Durbar that was earlier used as a school for the children of government officials.  Thirty two years later (1983) a new studio building was constructed, adjacent to the original building, and the older building was simply abandoned. 

However as time went by, the older building was renovated and new electronic equipment was installed, so that a total of 15 studios in the two buildings became available for Radio Nepal, including one with a 24 track console for the recording of music.  Up until the recent Virus time, Radio Nepal employed 600 personnel throughout Nepal for all of its events and activities.  

In addition to the capital city studios, additional production and on air studios have been installed in the radio stations at three country locations; Pokhara, Surkhet and Dipayal.  Radio Nepal broadcasts daily news bulletins in a total of 19 different languages, including 16 local languages, and also English, Hindi, and Urdu.

The first FM station in Nepal was installed in Kathmandu itself in 1995, and these days 17 FM relay stations are on the air.  In total, including all of the independent FM stations throughout the entire nation, around 450 FM stations were on the air until very recently.  Originally the program feed to the   country relay stations of Radio Nepal was via shortwave, though these days a six channel program feed is provided via satellite.

Back nearly 40 years ago (1983), Miss Mohini Shepherd acted as an offsite Honorary QSL Secretary for Radio Nepal.  Miss Mohini would prepare the QSL cards which were then delivered to Radio Nepal where they were signed, stamped, and posted.  

Back at that stage, Mohini was also preparing a regular monthly Nepal DX Report for broadcast in the old AWR DX program, Radio Monitors International.   Unfortunately, we have since lost contact with Mohini.  Does anyone out there know what happened to Mohini Shepherd as the years went by?  Did she and her family migrate to England?  We would really like to know.

Over the years, there have been many occasions when programming from the BBC in London in Nepali and English has been heard on the radio in Nepal.  For example, at the turn of the century, BBC programming in Hindi, Urdu and English was on relay from all radio stations in the network of Radio Nepal.  In addition, Radio Sagarmatha FM also carried BBC programming for many years around the same era.    

Then subsequent to those relay broadcasts from the BBC, there was a daily BBC relay in Hindi and English via the regional mediumwave station of Radio Nepal at Surkhet on 576 kHz.  Then in more recent time, the BBC installed their own FM relay station at suburban Khumaltar around 2005 which is still on the air, on 103.0 MHz.

Back around 30 years ago, Radio Nepal announced that a shortwave transmitter would be installed with the new mediumwave station at Surkhet in the far west of Nepal.  The mediumwave transmitter at  Karnali Raj Marg, Birendranagar operated with 100 kW (10 kW standby) on 576 kHz and the planned shortwave unit would also operate with 100 kW.  However, this planned shortwave transmitter was never installed.
(AWR Wavescan)

Radio Nepal Hindi Morning Signature Tune

Radio Nepal 1950

Radio Nepal Morning Shankka Dhun



Friday, April 16, 2021

Altlantic 2000 slated for Saturday broadcast

 


Atlantic 2000 will be on the air this Saturday, 17th of April from 0900 to 1000 UTC (1100 to 1200 CEST) on 6070 and 9670 kHz via Channel 292.

Streams will be available at the same time here: http://radioatlantic2000.free.fr

Good listening!

 Visit our website and listen to Atlantic 2000: http://radioatlantic2000.free.fr  

 


Moonbounce Radio

 


On two recent occasions here in Wavescan, we have presented the story of Moonbounce Radio with the events as they occurred in Europe and in the United States.  In our program today, we present the story of other significant Moonbounce events, as they occurred in chronological order in the United States, in Australia, and in Alaska.
It was in January 1946, that the American Army Signals Corps near Belmar in NJ successfully demonstrated the reception of echo signals from the Moon under the Diana Moonbounce Project.  Two months later in March 1946, the American International Telephone & Telegraph Corporation (IT&T) revealed the fact that their specialized engineers had also been engaged in a similar project, the reception of radar signals between two distant points on Earth via the Moon.  We should remember that this was before the introduction of the more satellite era.

In order to be effective, the transmitted signal from Earth needed to be at a very high frequency in order to successfully penetrate through the Ionospheric Layers surrounding planet Earth.  In addition, they declared, it would be a very expensive project.

Later in the same year, Westinghouse announced that they were planning a similar project and that they would be ready within the next 18 months to launch a rocket, aimed at the Moon.  Aboard the small rocket, which would be launched by the American Army, would be a 100-pound ultra shortwave transmitter.

This transmitter would be hermetically sealed into the rocket, and it would be programmed to broadcast pulse signals for one minute each hour.  These signals would then be received at special receiving stations upon Earth, and they would thus indicate the progress of the rocket in its travel to the Moon.

In November (1946), the first successful transmission of radio signals from outer space was achieved when a modified German-designed V2 rocket was fired by the American Air Force from White Sands in New Mexico.  This rocket contained a pulse transmitter, and it reached an altitude of 63½ miles.  The radio transmitter in this 1946 missile was activated from the ground by radio signals on both 6 MHz and 470 MHz.  The rocket transmitter broadcast a return pulse signal on 493 MHz.

On the next occasion of the firing of a high altitude rocket from White Sands in New Mexico, it was stated that sweep signals would be broadcast from outer space all the way from 3.5 MHz up to 6 MHz.  And then, on an even later occasion, they planned, another rocket will be fired, with a receiver and transmitter that was engineered to receive signals from chronohertz station WWV in Washington DC.  As this rocket travels through space, it would indicate the thickness of the various ionized layers in the ionosphere.

Around the same time, that is soon after the end of World War 2 in the middle of last century, Professor Frank Kerr at the Australian Council for Scientific and Industrial Research in northern suburban Sydney began to conduct research into Moonbounce Radio.  He installed a set of specially designed radio reception equipment at the Radio Physics Laboratory in an isolated area out from Hornsby, just off the Pacific Highway.

At predetermined times and dates, a radio signal was beamed to the Moon from a 100 kW transmitter located at the (now closed) Radio Australia shortwave station at Shepparton in Victoria, and reception from a Moon echo was recorded on many occasions at Hornsby.  The Shepparton frequencies were 17840 kHz and 21540 kHz, and these coded transmissions were carried by either of the two new 100 kW STC-AWA transmitters at Shepparton, VLA and VLB. 

Beginning on July 30, 1948, the University of Illinois at Urbana in the United States attempted to receive a Moonbounce echo from the Australian transmissions.  During the three-month period of these experimental transmissions, Urbana was able to receive an echo from the Moon, but only twice.

In the 1960s, a shortwave transmitter manufactured by the Pye company at Cambridge in England was installed at Jodrell Bank, 25 miles south of Manchester, for the transmission of music and speech.  These transmissions were successfully received as Moonbounce echoes at the American Air Force observatory at Sagamore Hill in Massachusetts in the United States.  

However at this stage, international radio communication was taking another direction.  On July 10, 1962, the American space agency NASA successfully launched a medium-level communication satellite, Telstar 1, from Cape Canaveral in Florida.  Shortly afterward, Telstar 1 began the relay of TV programming across the Atlantic for downlink relay in both Europe and North America.

It was demonstrated that Moonbounce radio was too expensive and too unreliable for regular international usage, and in any case it was now beginning to be superseded by a new and improved system; that is, geostationary communication satellites.  Moonbounce was no longer necessary.  

However in spite of all of these superior developments, Moonbounce radio is still alive, at least a little.  It is nowadays generally the purview of amateur radio operators around the world who hold an experimental interest in pursuing the novelty of communicating with other radio amateurs via an echo signal from Earth up to the Moon and back again.     

However, in a subsequent Moonbounce occasion, the American experimental HAARP radio station near Gakona in Alaska was used for a two-day Moonboince event in January 2008.  These Moonbounce transmissions utilized a massive total of 360 shortwave transmitters at 10 kW each, on two shortwave frequencies, 6792.5 kHz and 7407.5 kHz.  This two day experiment, on January 19 & 20, was conducted in an attempt to analyze the composition of the soil on the surface of the Moon.
(AWR/Wavescan)

From the Isle of Music & Uncle Bill's Melting Pot schedules, April 18-24

 



From the Isle of Music, April 18-24: 

This week, in honor of Jazz Appreciation Month, we repeat a 2020 episode with special guest Harold López-Nussa. 

The broadcasts take place: 

For Eastern Europe but audible well beyond the target area in most of the Eastern Hemisphere (including parts of East Asia and Oceania) with 100Kw, Sunday 1500-1600 UTC on SpaceLine, 9400 kHz, from Sofia, Bulgaria (1800-1900 MSK) 

For the Americas and parts of Europe, Tuesday 0000-0100 UTC on WBCQ, 7490 kHz from Monticello, ME, USA (Monday 8-9 PM EDT in the US). 

For Europe and sometimes beyond, Tuesday 1900-2000 UTC and Saturday 1200-1300 (NEW UTC) on Channel 292, 6070 kHz from Rohrbach, Germany. 


Uncle Bill’s Melting Pot, April 18-24: 

In episode 213, thanks to some suggestions about musicians from our listener friend Jaouad Saber in Morocco, we present some excellent music from that country. 

The broadcast take place: 

Sunday 2200-2300 UTC (6:00PM -7:00 PM EDT) on WBCQ The Planet 7490 kHz from the US to the Americas and parts of Europe 

Tuesday 2000-2100 UTC on Channel 292, 6070 kHz from Rohrbach, Germany for Europe. 

Saturday 0800-0900 UTC on Channel 292, 9670 kHz from Rohrbach, Germany for Europe with a directional booster aimed eastward, 

AND a special broadcast Saturday at 1900-2000 UTC on Channel 292, 3955 kHz. 


William "Bill" Tilford, Owner/Producer
Tilford Productions, LLC

Encore-Classical Music program schedules


Dear Listener,

Regular Broadcast times of Encore are: 
10:00 - 11:00 UTC Saturday 6070 kHz Channel 292 to Europe - Simulcast on 9670 kHz

Repeated:
22:00 - 23:00 UTC Saturday 5950 kHz WRMI to the US and Canada
01:00 - 02:00 UTC Sunday 7780 & 5850 kHz WRMI to Europe US and Canada
02:00 - 03:00 UTC Monday 5950 kHz WRMI to the US and Canada
16:00 – 17:00 UTC Sunday 9670 kHz Channel 292 to Europe
21:00 - 22:00 UTC Sunday 3955 kHz Channel 292 to Europe
22:00 – 23:00 UTC Thursday 5950 kHz WRMI to the US and Canada
11:00 - 12:00 UTC Friday 15770 kHz WRMI to Europe, east coast of US and Iceland.
19:00 – 20:00 UTC Friday 6070 kHz Channel 292 to Europe

SOME OF WRMI BROADCASTS MAY NOT HAPPEN DUE TO ELECTRICAL SUPPLY ISSUES FOR THE NEXT FEW WEEKS.

Our email is  encoretumbril@gmail.com. Informal reception reports as well as those requesting eQSL welcome. The website is www.tumbril.co.uk where we show transmission times and frequencies, the playlist for the most recent program, more information about Radio Tumbril, and the email link.
 
This week's program starts with part of a Quintet by Malcolm Arnold, a motet from Giovanni Palestrina, and some traditional dances from Armenia. After that a piece by Ravel, three piano pieces by contemporary composer Amy Beach and some of Beethoven's String Quartet No. 1.

Finally a sonata by Dario Costello and Téranga-Bah from Catrin Finch.

Channel 292 can be pulled live off the internet if the reception is poor in your location. Easy to find their site with a google search. A very good site for online SDR receivers all over the world is: http://kiwisdr.com/public/  Click the 'Map' button in the top left of the screen.
 
Thank you for spreading the word about Encore - Classical Music on Shortwave on Radio Tumbril.
 
Brice Avery - Encore - Radio Tumbril - Scotland
 


Shortwave Radiogram, weekend schedules

 


Hello friends
So this weekend we reach the milestone -- or kilometrestone -- of 200 programs. Thank you for tuning in and decoding, for your reports and interest. These have kept Shortwave Radiogram going since it succeeded VOA Radiogram in the summer of 2017.

A video of last weekend's Shortwave Radiogram (program 199) is provided by Scott in Ontario (Friday 1300 UTC). Another video, by Georgi in Bulgaria, lets us hear the interference on 15765 kHz just after the April 10 Shortwave Radiogram on 15770 kHz, as well as an amazing variety of signals and music in the 19-meter band.  The audio archive is maintained by Mark in the UK. The analysis is prepared by Roger in Germany.

Here is the lineup for Shortwave Radiogram, program 200, 15-18 April 2021, in MFSK modes as noted:
 
 1:42  MFSK32: Program preview (with a special image)*
 4:20  New technique for injection-molded glass objects*
10:07  MFSK64: New geophysical observatory at HAARP site*
15:23  This week's images*
27:30  MFSK32: Closing announcements (and look for a surprise mode)

* with image(s)
Please send reception reports to radiogram@verizon.net
Twitter: @SWRadiogram or https://twitter.com/swradiogram (visit during the weekend to see listeners' results)

Shortwave Radiogram Transmission Schedule
UTC Day UTC Time Frequency Transmitter
Saturday 0000-0030 UTC 9955 kHz WRMI Florida
Saturday 0230-0300 UTC 9265 kHz WINB Pennsylvania
Saturday 1330-1400 UTC 15770 kHz WRMI Florida
Sunday 0800-0830 UTC 5850 kHz
7730 kHz WRMI Florida/ Sunday 2330-2400 UTC 7780 kHz  WRMI Florida

The Mighty KBC transmits to North America Sundays at 0000-0200 UTC (Saturday 8-10 pm EDT) on 5960 kHz, via Germany. A minute of MFSK is at about 0130 UTC.  Reports to Eric: themightykbc@gmail.com . See also http://www.kbcradio.eu/ and https://www.facebook.com/TheMightyKbc/. 

“This is a Music Show” Most of the show is a music show, but the host transmits some MFSK text and image near the end of the broadcast. It’s transmitted on WRMI, Thursdays at 0200-0300 UTC on 5850 kHz (Wednesday evening in the Americas) and a new time also on WRMI, Wednesdays at 2100-2200 UTC on 7780 kHz (aimed towards Europe) . Also, look for a waterfall ID at the beginning of the show. thisisamusicshow@gmail.comwww.twitter.com/ThisIsAMusicSho/ @ThisIsAMusicSho

New York and Pennsylvania NBEMS nets. Most weekends, as KD9XB, I check in to the New York NBEMS (Narrow Band Emergency Messaging Software) net Saturday at 1200 UTC on 3584 kHz USB, and the Pennsylvania NBEMS net Sunday at 1130 UTC on 3583 kHz USB. Check-ins are usually in Thor 22, and messages are in MFSK32. Messages generally use the Flmsg add-on to Fldigi. If you are a radio amateur in eastern North America, feel free to check-in. Outside the region, use an SDR in the eastern USA to tune in and decode. You do not need Flmsg to check-in, and most of the messages can be read without Flmsg. If you can decode the net, send me an email to radiogram@verizon.net , or tweet to @SWRadiogram, and I will let them know you are tuned in. USEast NBEMS Net: Please also note the USEast NBEMS Net, Wednesdays 2300 UTC (7 pm EDT) on 3536 kHz USB.
 
Thanks for your reception reports!
Kim

Kim Andrew Elliott, KD9XB
Producer and Presenter
Shortwave Radiogram
Reporting on international broadcasting at https://twitter.com/kaedotcom 

Saturday, April 10, 2021

From the Isle of Music and Uncle Bill's Melting Pot schedules, April 11-17


 From the Isle of Music, April 11-April 17

This week, in honor of Jazz Appreciation Month, we reprise a 2020 episode with author Harold López-Nussa and his album Te lo dije. 

The broadcast takes place: 

For Eastern Europe but audible well beyond the target area in most of the Eastern Hemisphere (including parts of East Asia and Oceania) with 100kW, Sunday 1500-1600 UTC on SpaceLine, 9400 kHz, from Sofia, Bulgaria (1800-1900 MSK) 

For the Americas and parts of Europe, Tuesday 0000-0100 on WBCQ (NEW UTC), 7490 kHz from Monticello, ME, USA (Monday 8-9PM EST in the US). 

For Europe and sometimes beyond, Tuesday 1900-2000 UTC and Saturday 1200-1300 (NEW UTC) on Channel 292, 6070 kHz from Rohrbach, Germany. 

Our Facebook page is https://www.facebook.com/fromtheisleofmusic/ 
Our V-Kontakte page is https://vk.com/fromtheisleofmusic 
Our Patreon page is https://www.patreon.com/tilford 

Uncle Bill's Melting Pot, April 11-17
For the month of April, there is an additional repeat Saturdays 1900-2000 UTC on 3955 kHz from Channel 292, Germany. 
In episode 212, we present the first German-language recording of the musical Haare (Hair) from 1968. 

The broadcast takes place: 

Sunday 2200-2300 (NEW UTC) (6:00PM -7:00PM EST) on WBCQ The Planet 7490 kHz from the US to the Americas and parts of Europe 

Tuesday 2000-2100 UTC on Channel 292, 6070 kHz from Rohrbach, Germany for Europe. 

Saturday 0800-0900 UTC on Channel 292, 9670 kHz from Rohrbach, Germany for Europe with a directional booster aimed eastward, 

AND a special broadcast Saturday at 1900-2000 UTC on Channel 292, 3955 kHz. 

Our Facebook page is https://www.facebook.com/UncleBillsMeltingPot/ 
Our V-Kontakte page is https://vk.com/fromtheisleofmusic 
Our Patreon page is https://www.patreon.com/tilford 
William "Bill" Tilford, Owner/Producer
Tilford Productions, LLC

Friday, April 09, 2021

Shortwave Radiogram schedules, Friday-Sunday

 


Hello friends

Last week's experiment with text in the Burmese languages went well. It seems the Burmese were decoded successfully just about everywhere -- except Myanmar. But, then, we don't have any transmitters with good reception in Southeast Asia. It was decoded in Ireland using the TIVAR Android app and in Cuba using a simple portable radio placed next to a laptop computer.

In any case, the Burmese experiment was timely given Myanmar's current crackdown on online news.

A video of last weekend's Shortwave Radiogram (program 199) is provided by Scott in Ontario (Sunday 0800 UTC on 5850 kHz). And Matt KD8TTE produced this video about Shortwave Radiogram. The audio archive is maintained by Mark in the UK. The analysis is prepared by Roger in Germany.

This weekend, we will keep it simple, with no exotic alphabets, no HTML, no Flmag, and no surprise mode. Just text and images in our usual MFSK32 and MFSK64. And if you like to decode images, program 199 will have eleven of them (1 x MFSK32 and 10 x MFSK64).

Here is the lineup for Shortwave Radiogram, program 199, 8-11 April 2021, in MFSK modes as noted:

 1:43  MFSK32: Program preview
 2:46  Biodegradable plastic from fisheries waste*
 7:57  MFSK64: Blinken affirms the independence of VOA
11:22  This week's images*
28:35  MFSK32: Closing announcements

* with an image(s)
 
Please send reception reports to radiogram@verizon.net
And visit http://swradiogram.net
Twitter: @SWRadiogram or https://twitter.com/swradiogram (visit during the weekend to see listeners' results)

Shortwave Radiogram Transmission Schedule
UTC Day UTC Time-Frequency Transmitter

Friday 1500-1530 UTC 15750 kHz DRM WINB Pennsylvania
Saturday  0000-0030 UTC 9955 kHz  WRMI Florida
Saturday  0230-0300 UTC 9265 kHz  WINB Pennsylvania
Saturday  1330-1400 UTC 15770 kHz  WRMI Florida
Sunday    0800-0830 UTC 5850 kHz 7730 kHz  WRMI Florida
Sunday 2330-2400 UTC 7780 kHz  WRMI Florida

The Mighty KBC transmits to North America Sundays at 0000-0200 UTC (Saturday 8-10 pm EDT) on 5960 kHz, via Germany. A minute of MFSK is at about 0130 UTC.  Reports to Eric: themightykbc@gmail.com . See also http://www.kbcradio.eu/ and https://www.facebook.com/TheMightyKbc/. 

“This is a Music Show” Most of the show is a music show, but the host transmits some MFSK text and image near the end of the broadcast. It’s transmitted on WRMI, Thursdays at 0200-0300 UTC on 5850 kHz (Wednesday evening in the Americas) and a new time also on WRMI, Wednesdays at 2100-2200 UTC on 7780 kHz (aimed towards Europe) . Also, look for a waterfall ID at the beginning of the show. thisisamusicshow@gmail.com .  www.twitter.com/ThisIsAMusicSho/ @ThisIsAMusicSho

New York and Pennsylvania NBEMS nets. Most weekends, as KD9XB, I check in to the New York NBEMS (Narrow Band Emergency Messaging Software) net Saturday at 1200 UTC on 3584 kHz USB, and the Pennsylvania NBEMS net Sunday at 1130 UTC on 3583 kHz USB. Check-ins are usually in Thor 22, and messages are in MFSK32. Messages generally use the Flmsg add-on to Fldigi. If you are a radio amateur in eastern North America, feel free to check-in. Outside the region, use an SDR in the eastern USA to tune in and decode. You do not need Flmsg to check-in, and most of the messages can be read without Flmsg. If you can decode the net, send me an email to radiogram@verizon.net , or tweet to @SWRadiogram, and I will let them know you are tuned in. USEast NBEMS Net: Please also note the USEast NBEMS Net, Wednesdays 2300 UTC (7 pm EDT) on 3536 kHz USB.
 
Thanks for your reception reports!
Kim

Kim Andrew Elliott, KD9XB
Producer and Presenter
Shortwave Radiogram
Reporting on international broadcasting at https://twitter.com/kaedotcom 



Thursday, April 08, 2021

RFA Year of the Ox QSL to 30 April, 2021

There are still a few weeks to the close of April and your chance of the RFA Year of the Ox QSL. Stay tuned to this blog for the latest RFA QSL news of a new edition, when it becomes available. 

Special thanks to A.J. Janitschek, Director, Program and Operations Support, Radio Free Asia


                                    ®

    RADIO FREE ASIA ANNOUNCES YEAR OF THE OX QSL

JANUARY 2021

 Radio Free Asia (RFA) announces its latest QSL card commemorating 2021 as the Year of the Ox according to the Chinese astrology calendar. People born in ox years are considered kind, caring, logical, positive, having a great deal of common sense, and live with their feet ‘firmly planted on the ground.’ They are also considered to be hard workers in order to provide comfort and security for their families, while also highly intelligent and strong-minded. The ox is one of 12 animals used in the Chinese Zodiac; the others are tiger, rabbit, dragon, snake, horse, goat, monkey, rooster, dog, pig, and rat.  This QSL card confirms all valid reception reports from January 1 – April 30, 2021. The design was created by RFA’s Brian Powell.


 Created by Congress in 1994 and incorporated in 1996, RFA broadcasts in Burmese, Cantonese, Khmer, Korean to North Korea, Lao, Mandarin Chinese, Vietnamese, Tibetan (including Uke, Amdo, and Kham dialects), and Uyghur. RFA strives for accuracy, balance, and fairness in our editorial content. As a ‘surrogate’ broadcaster, RFA provides news and commentary specific to each of our target countries, acting as the free press these countries lack. RFA broadcasts only in local languages and dialects, and most of our broadcasts comprise news of specific local interest.  More information about RFA, including our current broadcast frequency schedule, is always available at www.rfa.org.

 RFA encourages listeners to submit reception reports.  Reception reports are valuable to RFA as they help us evaluate the signal strength and quality of our transmissions.  RFA confirms all accurate reception reports by mailing a QSL card to the listener.  RFA welcomes all reception report submissions at http://techweb.rfa.org (follow the QSL REPORTS link) not only from DX’ers but also from our general listening audience.

Reception reports are also accepted by email at qsl@rfa.org and by mail to:

Reception Reports
Radio Free Asia
2025 M. Street NW, Suite 300
Washington DC 20036
United States of America

 

Thursday, April 01, 2021

Vatican Radio schedules additional Easter broadcasts

 

Vatican: additional short wave broadcasts of Vatican Radio, excerpted from https://www.vaticannews.va/en/epg.html#events

All times local UTC+2. All via SMG except Chinese via Tinang

2 April 2021 Good Friday
2055-2230 h [1855-2030 UTC] Via Crucis guidata da Papa Francesco with commentary 

Arabic - Middle East: 7425 kHz
English - Africa: 7360 kHz
Français - Africa: 9705 kHz
Português - Africa: 13830 kHz

3 April 2021
1925-2120 h [1725-1920 UTC] Veglia Pasquale presieduta da Papa Francesco
Arabic - Middle East: 7425 kHz
Chinese - Asia: 7225 kHz
English - Africa: 11935 kHz
Français Africa: 13830 kHz
Português - Africa: 15565 kHz

4 April 2021 Easter Sunday
0955-1120 h [0755-0920 UTC] Santa Messa del Giorno di Pasqua presieduta da Papa Francesco
1155-1220 h [0955-1020 UTC] Messaggio Pasquale e Benedizione Urbi et Orbi
Arabic - Middle East: 15605 kHz
English - Africa: 17820 kHz
Français - Africa: 15575 kHz
Português - Africa: 17805 kHz

(via Mauno Ritola - WRTH -World Radio Tv Handbook Facebook Group, 1 April)
(BDXC 01 Apr 1, 2021)

Encore-Classical Music schedule update

 


Dear Listener,

NOTE - SOME CHANGES TO TIMES AND FREQUENCIES - SUMMER  SCHEDULE

Regular Broadcast times of Encore are: 
11:00 - 12:00 UTC Saturday 6070 kHz Channel 292 to Europe - Simulcast on 9670 kHz
(Moves to 10:00 - 11:00 UTC on 3/4/21)

Repeated:
22:00 - 23:00 UTC Saturday 5950 kHz WRMI to the US and Canada
01:00 - 02:00 UTC Sunday 7780, 5850 kHz WRMI to Europe US and Canada
02:00 - 03:00 UTC Monday 5950 kHz WRMI to the US and Canada
16:00 – 17:00 UTC Sunday 9670 kHz Channel 292 to Europe
21:00 - 22:00 UTC Sunday 3955 kHz Channel 292 to Europe
13:00 - 14:00 UTC Tuesday 15770 kHz WRMI to Europe, east coast of US and Iceland.
22:00 – 23:00 UTC Thursday 5950 kHz WRMI to the US and Canada
19:00 – 20:00 UTC Friday 6070 kHz Channel 292 to Europe (From 2/4/21)

Our email is  encoretumbril@gmail.com. Informal reception reports as well as those requesting eQSL welcome.
The website is www.tumbril.co.uk where we show transmission times and frequencies, the playlist for the most recent programme, more information about Radio Tumbril, and the email link.
 
This week's programme begins with two piano pieces from Swedish composer Benny Andersson. After that, we'll have orchestration of tango from the 1930s, a reverie by the American J P Sousa, and a modern work from Lubomyr Melnyk.

Something from Hugo Alfen's The Mountain King ballet suite next, a violin & piano piece by Debussy, and a movement from Septet No. 20 by Beethoven follow on.

The program ends with some funeral music from Henry Purcell and First Flight by contemporary composer Cecilia Mc Dowall.

Channel 292 can be pulled live off the internet if the reception is poor in your location. Easy to find their site with a google search.

A very good site for online SDR receivers all over the world is: http://kiwisdr.com/public/  Click the 'Map' button in the top left of the screen.
 
Thank you for spreading the word about Encore - Classical Music on Shortwave on Radio Tumbril.
 
Brice Avery - Encore - Radio Tumbril - Scotland
 

Shortwave Radiogram, weekend schedules

 

Hello friends

Did we survive the time changes and frequency changes of Spring 2021? The only new frequency this weekend is the Friday 1500-1530 UTC DRM transmission from WINB Pennsylvania, on new 15750 kHz, replacing 13655, for those of you who have a way to decode DRM. Also, be aware of new local times for some of the broadcasts.

In the analog shortwave world, reception sees to be improving as spring becomes established. A video of last weekend's Shortwave Radiogram (program 197) is provided by Scott in Ontario (Sunday 0800 UTC). The audio archive is maintained by Mark in the UK. The analysis is prepared by Roger in Germany.

This weekend, no Flmsg. The only "twist" will be some text in Burmese, the main language of Myanmar, where the internet has lately been disrupted.  The Burmese will require the UTF-8 character set, which is the default in Fldigi, TIVAR, and AndFlmsg -- and, I am informed, also now in MultiPSK.

Here is the lineup for Shortwave Radiogram, program 198, 1-4 April 2021, in MFSK modes as noted:
 
 1:43  MFSK32: Program preview
 2:51  Facebook, Google announce plans for undersea cables
 5:40  Excerpt of Burmese-language text
 9:50  MFSK64: Arctic lightning strikes triple over past decade
13:08  This week's images
28:06  MFSK32: Closing announcements

Please send reception reports to radiogram@verizon.net

And visit http://swradiogram.net
Twitter: @SWRadiogram or https://twitter.com/swradiogram (visit during the weekend to see listeners' results)
Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/567099476753304
Shortwave Radiogram Gateway Wiki https://wiki.radioreference.com/index.php/Shortwave_Radiogram_Gateway 

Shortwave Radiogram Transmission Schedule
UTC Day UTC Time Frequency Transmitter
Thursday 2330-2400 UTC 9265 kHz WINB Pennsylvania
Friday 1300-1330 UTC 15770 kHz WRMI Florida
Friday 1500-1530 UTC 15750 kHz DRM WINB Pennsylvania
Saturday 0000-0030 UTC 9955 kHz WRMI Florida
Saturday 0230-0300 UTC 9265 kHz WINB Pennsylvania
Saturday 1330-1400 UTC 15770 kHz WRMI Florida
Sunday 0800-0830 UTC 5850 kHz
7730 kHz WRMI Florida
Sunday 2330-2400 UTC 7780 kHz WRMI Florida

The Mighty KBC transmits to North America Sundays at 0000-0200 UTC (Saturday 8-10 pm EDT) on 5960 kHz, via Germany. A minute of MFSK is at about 0130 UTC.  Reports to Eric: themightykbc@gmail.com . See also http://www.kbcradio.eu/ and https://www.facebook.com/TheMightyKbc/. Also this weekend, Daz Man writes: "I have some Ham-DRM data. Needed: EasyPal or WinDRM plus 7zip (Windows) QSSTV or TRXAMADRM plus p7zip (Linux) Data is Mode E, QAM4, 3 passes - also with 3dB PAPR processing to boost SNR." 

“This is a Music Show” Most of the show is a music show, but the host transmits some MFSK text and image near the end of the broadcast. It’s transmitted on WRMI, Thursdays at 0200-0300 UTC on 5850 kHz (Wednesday evening in the Americas) and a new time also on WRMI, Wednesdays at 2100-2200 UTC on 7780 kHz (aimed towards Europe) . Also look for a waterfall ID at the beginning of the show. thisisamusicshow@gmail.com .  www.twitter.com/ThisIsAMusicSho/ @ThisIsAMusicSho

New York and Pennsylvania NBEMS nets. Most weekends, as KD9XB, I check in to the New York NBEMS (Narrow Band Emergency Messaging Software) net Saturday at 1200 UTC on 3584 kHz USB, and the Pennsylvania NBEMS net Sunday at 1130 UTC on 3583 kHz USB. Check-ins are usually in Thor 22, and messages are in MFSK32. Messages generally use the Flmsg add-on to Fldigi. If you are a radio amateur in eastern North America, feel free to check-in. Outside the region, use an SDR in the eastern USA to tune in and decode. You do not need Flmsg to check-in, and most of the messages can be read without Flmsg. If you can decode the net, send me an email to radiogram@verizon.net , or tweet to @SWRadiogram, and I will let them know you are tuned in. USEast NBEMS Net: Please also note the USEast NBEMS Net, Wednesdays 2300 UTC (7 pm EDT) on 3536 kHz USB.
 
Thanks for your reception reports!

 Kim
Kim Andrew Elliott, KD9XB
Producer and Presenter
Shortwave Radiogram
Reporting on international broadcasting at https://twitter.com/kaedotcom 





From the Isle of Music ans Uncle Bill's Melting Pot schedules

 


From the Isle of Music, April 4-April 10

This week, in honor of Jazz Appreciation Month, we reprise a 2020 episode with author Ricardo Oropesa and the music of Chano Pozo. 

The broadcasts take place: 

For Eastern Europe but audible well beyond the target area in most of the Eastern Hemisphere (including parts of East Asia and Oceania) with 100kW, Sunday 1500-1600 UTC on SpaceLine, 9400 kHz, from Sofia, Bulgaria (1800-1900 MSK) 

For the Americas and parts of Europe, Tuesday 0000-0100 on WBCQ (NEW UTC), 7490 kHz from Monticello, ME, USA (Monday 8-9PM EST in the US). 

For Europe and sometimes beyond, Tuesday 1900-2000 UTC and Saturday 1200-1300 (NEW UTC) on Channel 292, 6070 kHz from Rohrbach, Germany. 
Our Facebook page is https://www.facebook.com/fromtheisleofmusic/ 
Our V-Kontakte page is https://vk.com/fromtheisleofmusic 
Our Patreon page is https://www.patreon.com/tilford 

Uncle Bill's Melting Pot, April 4-10: 

In episode 211, we enjoy music from the Solomon Islands, Tonga and Vanuatu. 
The transmissions take place: 

Sunday 2200-2300 (NEW UTC) (6:00PM -7:00PM EST) on WBCQ The Planet 7490 kHz from the US to the Americas and parts of Europe 

Tuesday 2000-2100 UTC on Channel 292, 6070 kHz from Rohrbach, Germany for Europe. 

Saturday 0800-0900 UTC on Channel 292, 9670 kHz from Rohrbach, Germany for Europe with a directional booster aimed eastward. 

Our Facebook page is https://www.facebook.com/UncleBillsMeltingPot/ 
Our V-Kontakte page is https://vk.com/fromtheisleofmusic 
Our Patreon page is https://www.patreon.com/tilford 

(William "Bill" Tilford, Owner/Producer)
Tilford Productions, LLC
email: bill@tilfordproductions.com
website: www.tilfordproductions.com

Uncle Bill's Melting Pot Saturday Nights in April

 


Saturdays April  3, 10, 17 and 24, 1900-2000 UTC, 3955 kHz 
Channel 292, Rohrbach Waal, Germany 
Saturday nights in April, Uncle Bill's Melting Pot is adding an extra repeat to its offerings on Channel 292.   April 3 will bring music from the Solomon Islands, Tonga, and Vanuatu; April 10 will present the original German-language recording of Haare (Hair); April 17 will have music from Morocco and April 24 will be determined later.  The time and frequency were previously taken by Wooferton.  Uncle Bill is testing whether this will engage new listeners from Africa,  the Middle East and possibly South Asia. 
(Tilford Productions)

RADIO SE-TA 2 Back on the air in 2021

 


First of all, we would like to thank you again for the great response to our programs in 2020. We were very pleased with every letter! Please remain loyal to Radio SE-TA 2.

Our quarterly program series in 2021 restarts on April 3rd, 2021 with our one-hour show called "Let's Go Rock' n' Roll".

This time our program is from Nauen via the facilities of MEDIA BROADCAST on 6095 kHz with a radiation power of 125 KW. The reception area will be all of Central Europe. 

Transmission time will be from 10.00-11.00 UTC (12.00-13.00 CEST). Further transmissions with the same airtime and frequency are: 

Saturday, July 3rd, 2021 and 
Saturday, October 2nd, 2021

Your letters with comments, criticisms, and reception reports are welcome as always to:
SE-TA@web.de

Yours sincerely,

Christoph
RADIO SE-TA 2

Radio Emma Toc World Service, April schedules

 

April 2021 

Program Contents  -  Was radio better in the past?  Interview with Tony Smith from Angel Radio and lots of hellos to listeners, followed by The Wireless Years, a 30-minute program of vintage music 

Ways to listen - Radio Emma Toc World Service, Program No. 12 

Listen online at  http://www.emmatoc.com 
Radio Emma Toc World Service, April schedule and visit the World Service page.

You can listen to our shortwave or MW or FM broadcasts via our relay partners as follows:
WRMI - Radio Miami International, 9955kHz covering Latin America and beyond
Tues 18:00 Eastern Time (22:00 UTC) and Wed 20:00 Eastern Time (0000 Thursday) UTC   

WRMI - Radio Miami International, 5950kHz covering Eastern North America and far beyond.
Tues 18:00 Eastern Time (22:00 UTC, and Sunday 21:00 Eastern Time (0100 Monday) UTC   

World  FM -  88.2MHz, 107.6MHz covering Tawa, Marahau & Stoke, New Zealand
 Sundays 22:00 NZST / 09:00 UTC and Thursdays 16:30 NZST / 03:30 UTC (alternating with other programs) 

Channel 292 - 6070kHz - covering Europe ans beyond                     
Saturday, April 15, 15:00 BST / 14:00 UTC, and Sunday April 11 at 18:00 BST (17:00 UTC)
                         
Scandinavian Weekend Radio - 6170kHz, 11720kHz, 1602kHz, 94.9MHz                                                 
covering Finland and Europe, Saturday  3rd April 11:00 BST (10:00 UTC)   

Happy listening! If you are outside the transmitter coverage areas, why not listen via the broadcaster's online services. Website details for the above stations are listed on our own website www.emmatoc.org/worldserviceindex

If you don't have access to receivers and aerials you can try using an online SDR receiver at ve3sun.com/KiwiSDR. Experience the enjoyment of tuning around shortwaves from worldwide locations online.

We are happy to issue eQSLs for reception reports sent to emmatoc1922@gmail.com - and will gladly include for online reports. If using an online SDR, please give us the SDR location.

If any stations wish to relay our program, a download link is available on our website. Please advise us of times and dates so we can publicize in our schedule.

Thank you!
(Jim Salmon)

World Radio TV Handbook 2021 Review

 

World Radio TV Handbook 2021 Review 

Gayle Van Horn W4GVH
The Spectrum Monitor, March 2021 

The 2021 edition of WRTH has recently been released, this being their 75th Anniversary Edition. An editorial from Publisher, Nicholas Hardyman, begins this edition, followed by their annual focus of WRTH Contributors. This year’s focus is on Danish hobbyist and broadcaster of Denmark’s World Music Radio, Stig Hartvig Nielsen. Stig has an impressive radio background and notes his future in radio as, "I will still be tuning the bands in the years to come."

The Reviews section covers both high-end and moderately cost equipment, beginning with a five-star rating for the AOR AR5700D, a high-performance wide-band communications receiver, which covers AM, SAM, FM, WFM(S), SSB and CW, as well as decoding several modes and digital voice modes.

For portable operations or space considerations, the Bonito NTi MegaDipol MD300DX could be a consideration. This user-friendly broadband dipole operates from 9kHz to 300 MHz, and can be mounted in a variety of directions. The element can be increased for additional gain. Being small, it is ideal for locations lacking space and works exceptionally well.

An overview of the ICOM IC-7610, an HF+50 MHz transceiver, finds an impressive unit that includes two totally separate receivers, completely independent of the other, which can be tuned from 30kHz to 60MHz. The superb rating will be of interest to the serious amateur operator, DXer or casual shortwave listener.

The new Bonito NTi CCMC30, is an alternative to solving annoying hot spots that can cause a reduction of signal-to-noise ratio in your listening post. Installing this choke will help ensure your receiving station has as clean a signal as possible.

An Overview of the SRDPlay RSPdx reveals a receiver that excels in all types of monitoring whether from amateur, utility, broadcast, L-band, or others. The 14-bit single tuner SDR can receive the entire RF spectrum from 1 kHz to 2GHz. It is reasonably priced, presents and overall good performance as commented by the reviewer, “it's hard to think what's not to like about this great little receiver."

Thomas Witherspoon (K4SWL) provides an excellent review of the Tecsun PL-990, portable radio. His observations offer an affordable choice for a high-grade portable, one perfect for a take-along radio.

If you are considering audio streaming over a network, either as your own private access or for multi-use by hobbyist, the Valent F9x0 Kiwi SDR receiver would be a good choice to consider. The HF Software Defined Radio can receive the entire 10kHz to 32MHz VLF/LW/MW/HF spectrum and would be an asset to any listening post.

The Features section begins with a nostalgic look from BBC Senior Transmitter Engineer, Dave Porter (G4OYX). His outline of the history and development of HF high-power broadcast transmitters is an interesting in-depth feature.

Manfred Rippich delves into a forgotten, and sometimes elusive radio catch, in his look at Radio in Bhutan. Known as the Land of the Thunder Dragon, his story explains the introduction and expansion of radio from the Kingdom of Bhutan.

Dr Martin Hadlow, explains why an early portable radio was of fundamental importance in the Pacific War. His fascinating tale of Coastwatchers & the AWA Teleradio 3BZ, is an interesting nostalgia story during World War II.

On the first weekend of every month, listeners across the globe tune in to Scandinavian Weekend Radio. Alan Pennington, of the British DX Club, visited the station, based in Virrat, Finland, to learn of the   humble beginnings, their future, and why this station claims it to be the “hardest DX in the world.”

The annual update of HF Broadcasting Reception Conditions Expected During 2021 with an explanation of the New Solar Cycle 25 from Ulf-Peter Hoppe, adjunct professor of physics at the Arctic University of Norway. He predicts 2021, as one of “good reception in the HF broadcasting bands.” With assistance from his Most Suitable Frequencies 2021 chart, hobbyists can easily plan the next monitoring sessions.

Thirteen pages of colored maps, plus the World Timetable, is a helpful introduction to the National Radio section. The section includes domestic radio stations broadcasting to a national listening audience on mediumwave, shortwave, FM, and DAB. Listings are grouped by country and include frequencies, transmitter information, power kW, contact, and website information.

The International Radio section, lists the same information for international broadcasters, airing to a world listening audience.

Clandestine and other Target Broadcasts cover stations broadcasting politically motivated programming or stations targeted at zones of local or regional conflicts. A one-page listing of Religious Broadcasters Cross Reference Table closes this section.

The Frequency List includes by-frequency listings of world mediumwave stations. SW Stations of the World is a by-frequency listing of stations, followed by International Broadcasts in English, French, German, Portuguese, and Spanish, listed in a 24-hour format.

DRM International Broadcast are 24-hour UTC listings of worldwide stations broadcasting on DRM. The Section Guide continues with National Television, listing information in country order.

The closing section is Reference, an extensive listing of country indexes and codes, world transmitter sites, radio clubs, organizations, and institutes, selected Internet resources, WRTH abbreviations and symbols. Additional information includes Transmitter Sites (Location and Decode Tables) for international transmitter sites, Domestic SW Transmitter Sites, and Standard Time & Frequency Transmissions, containing contact information and schedules for worldwide time and frequency stations.

This is the 75th edition of the WRTH and it represents a milestone in the world of radio publication. Coupled with a dedicated global resource staff, it continues to set the standard of vital information, one that is unparalleled. It remains, after 75 years, the most comprehensive exemplary reference book. I highly recommend WRTH 2021, to novice or seasoned hobbyists. WRTH should be in every listening post. Congratulations on 75 gold-standard years.

World Radio TV Handbook 2021, is available from the following sources: