Friday, August 17, 2018

Blog Logs - monitoring global radio

Recent monitoring from Qatar SDR unit, from our secluded DX Cabin in the mountains of North Carolina


All times UTC / frequency in kHz (kilohertz) // parallel frequency

Denge Welat 11530 kHz
Clandestine
11530, Denge Welat 1735-1800 (ex. Denge Kurdistan) Kurdish conversations to 1750, followed by clear station ID. Kurdish recitations and vocals. Good signal SIO 434. Middle Eastern vocals in presumed Kurdish. Schedule is 0500-2200. (SDR Izghawa, Qatar)

11830, Radio Dandal Kura International 1802-1825. Announcer’s English/Kanuri news format to 1807. Horn of African music bridge to news about Nigeria. Fair signal SIO 323. Additional program segments about Nigeria. Station is funded by the USAID and targeted to the Kanuri and Hausa population, in areas under the influence of Boko Haram. Website: http://www.dandalkura.com (SDR Izghawa, Qatar)

Ethiopia
5940, Ethiopia Somalia Reg. State Radio/Delgaenka Soomaalida 1838-1845. Fair-poor signal of (SIO 222) what was likely this station. Horn of Africa style music on a Krar instrument in progress. Brief Somali comments from announcer, into HOA music. Great music but not positive. (SDR Izghawa, Qatar)

6110, Radio Fana 1847-1902. SIO 333 and certainly easier to monitor. HOA music to 1852. Service listed as Oromo. Music to tone signal at 1859 and reference to “Fana.” Signal covered at 1902. (SDR Izghawa, Qatar)

Voice of Tigray Revol. 5950 kHz
5950, Voice of Tigray Revol., 1902-1920. ISWBG listing as Afar/Tigrinya. Fair signal SIO 322, text from 1902  tune-in. Audio bits of speech before gathering. Talk to HOA Krar music. Additional speech segments with echo effect. HOA music to 1919 as speeches continue. (SDR Izghawa, Qatar)

Firedrake Jammer/Clandestine-Radio Al-Azm
11745, 1815-1830. Caught this Firedrake on subsequent days, heard 1900-1950, running parallel with 9745, while checking for clandestine station Radio Al-Azm. The clanny is underneath Firedrake, and audible when they dropped off at 1925. Arabic vocals and programming to 1950 tune-out. (SDR Izghawa, Qatar)


RTA Algeria QSL/Gayle Van Horn Collection
France
13820, Radio Algerienne/Holy Qu’ran (relayed via Issoudun, France) 1832-1845.  Qu’ran recitations from tune-in to 1836. Arabic announcement to Arabic vocals. Signal quality SIO 343. Station is scheduled for sign-off at 2300. Website: http://www.radioalgerie.dz ((SDR Izghawa, Qatar)

Oman
15140, Radio Sultanate of Oman 1735-1750. Arabic readings over Arabic instrumental music. Fanfare music to production intros. SIO 333. Arabic service for this segment 1500-2000. Website: http://part.gov.om (SDR Izghawa, Qatar)

Saudi Arabia
9555, SBC Radio Saudi-General Program 1. 1738-1800. Male/female with Arabic technology segment on “Internet, hyperlinks, iphones, and Chrome.” Easy-listening Arabic music to 1740. Frequency 9870 is parallel from 1800. (SDR Izghawa, Qatar)

SBC Radio Saudi-Holy Qu’ran 1743-1830. Arabic Qu’ran in progress. Also noted  // 13710, 15205 and 17560, targeted to Africa, Programming shifts to 11820 // 11915, 11930 at 1755-2257. (SDR Izghawa, Qatar)   

Somalia/Somiland
7120, Tentative on Radio Hargeisa 1740-1815. Somali service with fair SIO 232. Readings to 1802. Brief musical fanfare into extended talks. No news briefs or 1800 ID format. (SDR Izghawa, Qatar)



Voice of Turkey's large footprint on 15520 kHz
Turkey
15520, Voice of Turkey 1705-1725. Selections of Turkish music from tune-in to 1714. Fanfare to announcer’s English comment, “before we close the English service”, and followed with news headlines. Station ID, freqs/meter bands, broadcast hours, satellite info, website, target areas and “thanks and goodbye” to listeners. Instrumental Turkish music to 1725. VOT Spanish was heard on 5960 // 9460 at 1708 check. Noted also that the French service and the Spanish service use to same Turkish tune to close-down their programming. (SDR Izghawa, Qatar)

United Arab Emirates
1269 MW, Radio Asia Network, 1728-1735. Pop music vocals to 1730. Announcer’s Malayalam service with items about the station, including promo. Signal quality fair and mixing as my last log, with Radio Kuwait. (SDR Izghawa, Qatar)
(GVH) 

Thursday, August 16, 2018

Bill Plum's Airmail Postage & DX Supplies Update


Dear Customer,


Below are DX supply Offers and news for  now !!!   SEPTEMBER 2018. 

+ + + + + DISCOUNT POSTAGE UPDATE!!!!!    !!! SEE GRID BELOW !!!!    50c  units in 2 stamps IN STOCK AGAIN!!!   


DX Supplies 2018:  Sorry to say, but I do not plan to restock Euro envelopes once they sell out. Envelope sales for 2017 were half the envelope sales of 2016, and a dismal 20%  of what I sold in 2013.  2018's selling pace is much slower. Below are listed new envelope ordering options designed to maximize sales based on what I have on hand.  QSL Albums and pages will not be restocked once sold out. At this point, it just doesn't make sense to re-stock items that take so long to sell...or not to sell.   DX Postage:  Countries will be deleted when sold out. 

DX SUPPLY INVENTORY:
I will keep you informed of supply stock in future emails.

EUROPEAN PLAIN RETURNS ARE SOLD OUT!!!!!! Several large orders received last week and today.
SEE NEW PRICES FOR EUROPEAN PLAIN MAILERS !!!!!! 

About 10 QSL albums in stock. All good condition. Each has 50 pages.

Extra Album pages are sold out.
  
European AIR Mailers are ALMOST GONE  +++See Close Out Special BELOW +++

DX Stamp Inventory:   Cuba and PR China are sold out. Now deleted from stamp list.



U.S. DISCOUNT POSTAGE DEALS!!

Save Big on your domestic mailings when you plaster 
 your envelope with colorful vintage stamps!
HAPPY  MAILING!!
50c units
Forever
2 stamps 
in  3 stamps
4 stamps  
 5 stamps
x 100
$46.00
$44.00 
$43.00
$42.00
$41.00 
x 200
$88.00
$70.00 
$65.00
$64.00 
$63.00 
x 500
$215.00
$165.00 
$160.00 
$159.00 
$158.00 
+++ SEPTEMBER SPECIAL: 1,000 Forever Stamps for $410.00 !!!+++
$1.15 International (1 oz.) Rate in 4 stamps
x 100 units =  $95.   -:- -:-   x 200 units = $165    
Sent to USA addresses only.
+++ NEW! +++
Add $3.00 Shipping Charge to orders of discount postage
in quantities of 500 and more.

        SEPTEMBER 2018  DX  SUPPLY  OFFERS

NEW Envelope Options With NEW PRICING!!!

400 European PLAIN Mailers - $40.00

1000 European PLAIN Mailers - $90.00
These are the only ordering options for remaining envelopes!!


SPECIAL!!    500 European AIR Mailers - $35.00  the last ones...SPECIAL!! 



QSL Albums still available
1 Standard Album - $35.00
SPECIAL!!   2 QSL Albums - $65.00  SPECIAL!!!!


300 #6-3/4 Forever Stamped Envelopes - $150.00
with FREE shipping!!


  
Shipping, via Priority Mail Only: Orders up to $40.00 add $9.00, orders from $41.00 to $100.00 add $15.00. orders from $101.00 to $150.00 add $20.00, orders over $150.00 add 15%. When ordering supplies and stamps, the stamps ride free, just use supply total to figure shipping costs. Shipments to Canada and overseas ship at a greater cost. (07/2015 modified)

Stamps Only Orders: Just add $1.00 P&H for posting to USA, add $2.00 for posting to Canada.

73, bill

William Plum
12 Glenn Road
Flemington, NJ 08822
908 788 1020

Email: plumdx@msn.com

Clandestine station, summer schedule updates

Effective from: 15 August 2018

All times UTC



Al-Azm Radio
Al-Azm Radio
0000-2400 on 11745 JED or RIY / unknown to N/ME Arabic

Radio Republica
0100-0300 on  9490 ISS 150 kW / 285 deg to Cuba Spanish

Voice of Kashmir
0230-0330 on  6030 DEL 100 kW / non-dir to SoAs Kashmiri

Dengê Welat
0230-0500 on  9525 ISS 250 kW / 090 deg to WeAs Kurdish

Radio Republica
0300-0400 on  9490 ISS 150 kW / 285 deg to Cuba Spanish Sun/Mon

Voice of Freedom
0300-0800 on  5920 HWA 010 kW / non-dir to NEAs Korean

Radio Tamazuj
0330-0430 on  7315 ISS 250 kW / 138 deg to EaAf Juba Arabic
0330-0430 on  9600 ISS 250 kW / 138 deg to EaAf Juba Arabic
0330-0430 on 11650 MDC 250 kW / 340 deg to EaAf Juba Arabic



Eye Radio
0400-0500 on 11620 MDC 250 kW / 335 deg to EaAf Juba Arabic/English* Mon-Fri
* including other languages: Dinka; Nuer; Shilluk; Bari; Zande and Lutoho

Radio Dabanga
0430-0500 on  7315 ISS 250 kW / 138 deg to EaAf Juba Arabic
0430-0500 on  9600 ISS 250 kW / 138 deg to EaAf Juba Arabic
0430-0500 on 13800 MDC 250 kW / 335 deg to EaAf Juba Arabic

Echo of Unification
0400-0600 on  3966vCNG 005 kW / non-dir to NEAs Korean
0400-0600 on  5905 PYO 100 kW / non-dir to NEAs Korean
0400-0600 on  6250 PYO 100 kW / non-dir to NEAs Korean

Radio International
0500-0600 on  5960 ASC 250 kW / 065 deg to WeAf Kanuri

Dandal Kura Radio International
0500-0600 on  7220 ISS 100 kW / 167 deg to CeAf Kanuri

Dengê Welat
0500-0600 on 11530 ISS 250 kW / 090 deg to WeAs Kurdish

Voice of The People
0530-2330 on  3480 K-S 050 kW / non-dir to NEAs Korean
0530-2330 on  3910 K-S 050 kW / non-dir to NEAs Korean
0530-2330 on  3930 K-S 050 kW / non-dir to NEAs Korean
0530-2330 on  4450 K-S 050 kW / non-dir to NEAs Korean
0530-2330 on  6520 K-S 050 kW / non-dir to NEAs Korean
0530-2330 on  6600 K-S 050 kW / non-dir to NEAs Korean

Radio International
0600-0700 on  7415 ASC 250 kW / 065 deg to WeAf Kanuri

Dandal Kura Radio International
0600-0700 on 11910 ISS 100 kW / 167 deg to CeAf Kanuri

Dengê Welat
0600-1500 on 11530 KCH 300 kW / 130 deg to WeAs Kurdish

Echo of Hope
0600-2400 on  3985 HWA 100 kW / non-dir to NEAs Korean
0600-2400 on  4885 SEO 100 kW / non-dir to NEAs Korean
0600-2400 on  5995 HWA 100 kW / non-dir to NEAs Korean
0600-2400 on  6250 SEO 010 kW / 010 deg to NEAs Korean
0600-2400 on  6350 HWA 100 kW / non-dir to NEAs Korean
0600-2400 on  9100 SEO 010 kW / 010 deg to NEAs Korean

Radio International
0700-0800 on 13810 WOF 250 kW / 165 deg to WeAf Kanuri/French

Voice of Kashmir
0730-0830 on  6100 DEL 250 kW / 134 deg to SoAs Kashmiri

Voice of Freedom
0900-1500 on  5920 HWA 010 kW / non-dir to NEAs Korean

Republic of Yemen Radio
0900-0700 on 11860 JED or RIY / unknown to N/ME Arabic

Suab Xaa Moo Zoo, Voice of Hope
1130-1200 on  7530 TSH 100 kW / 250 deg to SEAs Hmong

Echo of Unification
1200-1400 on  3966vCNG 005 kW / non-dir to NEAs Korean
1200-1400 on  5905 PYO 100 kW / non-dir to NEAs Korean
1200-1400 on  6250 PYO 100 kW / non-dir to NEAs Korean




Voice of Tibet
1200-1205 on 11653 DB  100 kW / 095 deg to EaAs Chinese
1205-1230 on 11644 DB  100 kW / 095 deg to EaAs Chinese

Radio ERGO
1200-1300 on 17845 DHA 250 kW / 225 deg to EaAf Somali

Radio Que Me
1200-1230 on  9930 HBN 100 kW / 318 deg to EaAs Vietnamese Fri

Voice of Tibet
1230-1235 on 11604 DB  100 kW / 131 deg to CeAs Tibetan
1235-1300 on 11601 DB  100 kW / 131 deg to CeAs Tibetan

National Unity Radio
1200-1500 on  9885 DB  100 kW / 071 deg to NEAs Korean

Radio Free North Korea
1200-1300 on 15630 TAC 100 kW / 076 deg to NEAs Korean

Voice of Tibet
1300-1305 on 11623 DB  100 kW / 095 deg to EaAs Chinese
1305-1330 on 11614 DB  100 kW / 095 deg to EaAs Chinese


Shiokaze Sea Breeze
1300-1330 on  7215 YAM 300 kW / 280 deg to NEAs Chinese Mon
1300-1330 on  7215 YAM 300 kW / 280 deg to NEAs Japanese Tue
1300-1330 on  7215 YAM 300 kW / 280 deg to NEAs Korean Wed
1300-1330 on  7215 YAM 300 kW / 280 deg to NEAs English Thu
1300-1330 on  7215 YAM 300 kW / 280 deg to
NEAs Korean Fri


1300-1330 on  7215 YAM 300 kW / 280 deg to NEAs Japanese Sat
1300-1330 on  7215 YAM 300 kW / 280 deg to NEAs Korean Sun

Voice of Tibet
1300-1305 on  9877 DB  100 kW / 131 deg to CeAs Tibetan
1305-1400 on  9876 DB  100 kW / 131 deg to CeAs Tibetan
1330-1400 on  9896 DB  100 kW / 131 deg to CeAs Tibetan

Nippon no Kaze
1300-1330 on  9465 TSH 300 kW / 002 deg to NEAs Korean
1300-1330 on  9900 TSH 300 kW / 352 deg to NEAs Korean
1300-1330 on  9940 TSH 100 kW / 002 deg to NEAs Korean

Shiokaze Sea Breeze
1330-1400 on  7215 YAM 300 kW / 280 deg to NEAs Korean Mon
1330-1400 on  7215 YAM 300 kW / 280 deg to NEAs Japanese Tue
1330-1400 on  7215 YAM 300 kW / 280 deg to NEAs Korean Wed
1330-1400 on  7215 YAM 300 kW / 280 deg to NEAs English Thu
1330-1400 on  7215 YAM 300 kW / 280 deg to NEAs Korean Fri
1330-1400 on  7215 YAM 300 kW / 280 deg to NEAs Korean Sat
1330-1400 on  7215 YAM 300 kW / 280 deg to NEAs Japanese Sun

Voice of Wilderness
1330-1530 on  7625 TAC 100 kW / 070 deg to NEAs Korean

Furusato no Kaze
1330-1400 on  9705 TSH 300 kW / 002 deg to NEAs Japanese
1330-1400 on  9455 TSH 300 kW / 352 deg to NEAs Japanese
1330-1400 on  9950 TSH 100 kW / 002 deg to NEAs Japanese

Furusato no Kaze
1405-1435 on  7325 YAM 300 kW / 280 deg to NEAs Japanese

Voice of Kashmir
1430-1530 on  6030 DEL 100 kW / non-dir to SoAs Kashmiri

North Korea Reform Radio
1430-1530 on  7580 TAC 100 kW / 076 deg to NEAs Korean

Furusato no Kaze
1430-1500 on  9450 TSH 300 kW / 352 deg to NEAs Japanese
1430-1500 on  9560 TSH 300 kW / 002 deg to NEAs Japanese
1430-1500 on  9960 HBN 100 kW / 345 deg to NEAs Japanese

Living Water Ministry Broadcasting
1500-1600 on  9470 DB  100 kW / 071 deg to NEAs Korean Tue-Thu
1500-1530 on  9470 DB  100 kW / 071 deg to NEAs Korean Fri

Nippon no Kaze
1500-1530 on  7335 TSH 300 kW / 352 deg to NEAs Korean
1500-1530 on  9685 TSH 300 kW / 002 deg to NEAs Korean
1500-1530 on  9975 HBN 100 kW / 345 deg to NEAs Korean

Eye Radio
1500-1600 on 15410 ISS 250 kW / 139 deg to EaAf Juba Arabic/English* Mon-Fri
* including other languages: Dinka; Nuer; Shilluk; Bari; Zande and Lutoho

Radio Tamazuj
1500-1530 on 15150 MDC 250 kW / 340 deg to EaAf Juba Arabic
1500-1530 on 15550 SMG 250 kW / 150 deg to EaAf Juba Arabic

Dengê Welat
1500-2100 on 11530 ISS 250 kW / 090 deg to WeAs Kurdish

Voice of Martyrs
1530-1600 on  7505 TAC 100 kW / 076 deg to NEAs Korean

Nippon no Kaze
1530-1600 on  7335 TSH 300 kW / 352 deg to NEAs Korean
1530-1600 on  9685 TSH 300 kW / 002 deg to NEAs Korean
1530-1600 on  9965 HBN 100 kW / 345 deg to NEAs Korean

Radio Dabanga
1530-1630 on 15150 MDC 250 kW / 340 deg to EaAf Juba Arabic
1530-1630 on 15550 ISS 250 kW / 138 deg to EaAf Juba Arabic

Shiokaze Sea Breeze
1600-1630 on  6165 YAM 300 kW / 280 deg to NEAs Chinese Mon
1600-1630 on  6165 YAM 300 kW / 280 deg to NEAs Japanese Tue
1600-1630 on  6165 YAM 300 kW / 280 deg to NEAs Korean Wed
1600-1630 on  6165 YAM 300 kW / 280 deg to NEAs English Thu
1600-1630 on  6165 YAM 300 kW / 280 deg to NEAs Korean Fri
1600-1630 on  6165 YAM 300 kW / 280 deg to NEAs Japanese Sat
1600-1630 on  6165 YAM 300 kW / 280 deg to NEAs Korean Sun

Furusato no Kaze
1600-1630 on  7335 TSH 300 kW / 352 deg to NEAs Japanese
1600-1630 on  9470 TSH 300 kW / 002 deg to NEAs Japanese
1600-1630 on  9960 HBN 100 kW / 345 deg to NEAs Japanese

Radio Ranginkaman/Radio Rainbow
1600-1630 on  7580 TAC 100 kW / 236 deg to WeAs Farsi Mon/Fri

Radio Xoriyo Ogaden
1600-1630 on 17770 ISS 500 kW / 130 deg to EaAf Somali Mon/Fri
1600-1630 on 17630 ISS 500 kW / 130 deg to EaAf Somali Tue/Sat

Radio Voice of Independent Oromiya
1600-1630 on 17850 ISS 250 kW / 130 deg to EaAf Oromo Sun

Voice of Freedom
1600-2000 on  5920 HWA 010 kW / non-dir to NEAs Korean

Shiokaze Sea Breeze
1630-1700 on  6165 YAM 300 kW / 280 deg to NEAs Korean Mon
1630-1700 on  6165 YAM 300 kW / 280 deg to NEAs Japanese Tue
1630-1700 on  6165 YAM 300 kW / 280 deg to NEAs Korean Wed
1630-1700 on  6165 YAM 300 kW / 280 deg to NEAs English Thu
1630-1700 on  6165 YAM 300 kW / 280 deg to NEAs Korean Fri
1630-1700 on  6165 YAM 300 kW / 280 deg to NEAs Korean Sat
1630-1700 on  6165 YAM 300 kW / 280 deg to NEAs Japanese Sun

Nippon no Kaze
1630-1700 on  7335 TSH 300 kW / 352 deg to NEAs Korean

Furusato no Kaze
1700-1730 on  6155 TSH 300 kW / 352 deg to NEAs Japanese

Voice of Oromo Liberation
1700-1730 on 15420 NAU 100 kW / 139 deg to EaAf Afan Oromo Wed/Fri/Sun

Dimtse Radio Erena
1700-1800 on  9720 SCB 050 kW / 195 deg to EaAf Tigrinya/Arabic Mon-Fri
1700-1800 on  9720 SCB 050 kW / 195 deg to EaAf Tigrinya Sat
1700-1800 on  9720 SCB 050 kW / 195 deg to EaAf Arabic Sun

Voice of Amara Radio
1700-1800 on 15360 ISS 250 kW / 120 deg to EaAf Amharic Sat-Mon/Wed

Voice of Oromo Liberation
1730-1800 on 15420 NAU 100 kW / 139 deg to EaAf Amharic Wed

Radio Nigeria Hausa Sce/Radio Na Gaskiya/Radio of Truth
1800-1900 on 15110 SCB 050 kW / 195 deg to WeAf Hausa

Dandal Kura Radio International
1800-2000 on 11830 ISS 100 kW / 167 deg to CeAf Kanuri

Radio International
1800-2100 on 12050 ASC 250 kW / 065 deg to WeAf Kanuri

Radio Itahuka
1800-1900 on 15420 MDC 250 kW / 320 deg to SoAf Kirundi Sat

Lutheran World Federation Voice of Gospel(Sawtu Linjilia)
1830-1900 on 15315 ISS 500 kW / 180 deg to WCAf Fulfulde

North Korea Reform Radio
2030-2130 on  7495 TAC 100 kW / 076 deg to NEAs Korean

Voice of Freedom
2100-0200 on  5920 HWA 010 kW / non-dir to NEAs Korean

Echo of Unification
2200-2400 on  3966vCNG 005 kW / non-dir to NEAs Korean
2200-2400 on  5905 PYO 100 kW / non-dir to NEAs Korean
2200-2400 on  6250 PYO 100 kW / non-dir to NEAs Korean

Suab Xaa Moo Zoo, Voice of Hope
2230-2300 on  7530 TSH 100 kW / 250 deg to SEAs Hmong

Voice of Tibet
2300-2307 on  7483 DB  100 kW / 131 deg to CeAs Tibetan
2307-2330 on  7498 DB  100 kW / 131 deg to CeAs Tibetan
2330-2337 on  7493 DB  100 kW / 131 deg to CeAs Tibetan
2337-2400 on  7498 DB  100 kW / 131 deg to CeAs Tibetan

Sound of Hope/SOH Xi Wang Zhi Sheng-RFA relay, low powered, time vary
0000-2400 on  6230 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
0000-2400 on  6280 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
0000-2400 on  6370 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
0000-2400 on  6730 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
0000-2400 on  6870 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
0000-2400 on  6900 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
0000-2400 on  7210 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
0000-2400 on  7280 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese

0000-2400 on  7310 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
0700-0100 on  7600 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
0000-2400 on  7730 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
0000-2400 on  7800 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2100-1600 on  9100 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
0800-2300 on  9155 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2200-1700 on  9180 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2200-1500 on  9200 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
0100-1600 on  9230 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
1100-1600 on  9255 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2200-1700 on  9280 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
0000-1700 on  9320 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
1000-0300 on  9360 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2200-1800 on  9540 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2200-1700 on  9635 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2100-1700 on  9730 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2100-1600 on  9850 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2200-1700 on  9920 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2200-1700 on  9970 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2200-1700 on 10820 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2100-1700 on 10870 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2100-1800 on 10920 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2100-1700 on 10960 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2200-1700 on 11070 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2200-1600 on 11100 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2200-1700 on 11150 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2100-1700 on 11300 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2100-1700 on 11410 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2100-1700 on 11440 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2100-1700 on 11460 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2000-1700 on 11500 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2000-1600 on 11530 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2300-1600 on 11580 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
0000-1600 on 11600 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2100-1700 on 11715 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2100-1500 on 11765 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2100-1800 on 11775 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2100-1700 on 11970 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2100-1700 on 12150 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2100-1700 on 12170 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
0000-1600 on 12190 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2100-1700 on 12230 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2100-1500 on 12345 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2100-1600 on 12370 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2100-1600 on 12430 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2100-1700 on 12500 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2100-1700 on 12560 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2100-1400 on 12775 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2100-1600 on 12800 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2100-1700 on 12870 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2200-1700 on 12910 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2200-1500 on 12950 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2100-1700 on 12980 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2200-1700 on 13070 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2100-1400 on 13130 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2200-1700 on 13230 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2100-1700 on 13270 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2100-1600 on 13530 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2100-1500 on 13620 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2300-1500 on 13640 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2100-1500 on 13680 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2200-1400 on 13775 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2100-1400 on 13820 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2200-1700 on 13890 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2200-1400 on 13920 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2300-1500 on 13980 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2300-1500 on 14370 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2100-1700 on 14430 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2200-1600 on 14500 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2300-1500 on 14600 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2200-1600 on 14700 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2200-1500 on 14775 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2100-1500 on 14800 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2200-1600 on 14850 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2200-1600 on 14870 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2200-1500 on 14900 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2100-1500 on 14920 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
0100-1600 on 14980 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2100-1700 on 15070 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2100-1700 on 15295 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2200-1700 on 15340 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2100-1600 on 15775 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
0000-1700 on 15800 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2200-1600 on 15840 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2100-1700 on 15870 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2100-1700 on 15970 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2100-1400 on 16100 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2100-1500 on 16160 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2200-1700 on 16250 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2200-1600 on 16300 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2300-1400 on 16350 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2100-1500 on 16600 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2300-1400 on 16770 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2200-1500 on 16775 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2100-1600 on 16980 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2100-1500 on 17000 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2200-1400 on 17200 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2200-1400 on 17400 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2300-1300 on 17440 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2200-1000 on 18870 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
2300-1000 on 21800 unknown kW / non-dir to EaAs Chinese
(DX Bulgaria 15 Aug)

Wednesday, August 15, 2018

DXers Unlimited - midweek edition, August 14, 2018


Arnie Coro, CO2KK


Hi amigos all around the world, I am Arnie Coro your host here at the middle of the week edition of Dxers Unlimited on the air and on the web from beautiful La Habana Cuba.

The “non-conversational” digital communications mode FT8 is providing many city dwellers with a viable option to make contacts otherwise impossible with SSB or CW. It has also brought a lot of controversy that in my opinion has benefitted amateur radio during this extended period of extremely low solar activity and its associated very poor HF bands propagation conditions. Here is a very nice comment about the FT 8 digital mode

It is a fact that FT8 is extremely popular right now. Even when band conditions are good, there are times when few or no CW or PSK signals are present on a particular band, yet the band has lots of FT8 signals, with many stations easily workable with QRP and a simple antenna.

It is also a fact that FT8 is the easiest ham mode to use, and simply make contacts, barring none. Especially with QRP power. Under favorable conditions, you can work and log a station, exchanging call signs, signal reports, and Grid Locations, in under two minutes, by a couple of mouse clicks. The data is formatted and exchanged totally automatically. Another mouse click confirms the entry for logging.

But let me make it quite clear amigos, for all practical purposes, this mode is totally "non-conversational."

Yes, you can compose and send a station a 13-character message, but you can't ask that ham if he also operates on six meters or the type of antenna in use.

FT8 gives no chance for person to person dinamic exchange of information other than the data provided by the 13 characters messages!

Item # Two: Special interest to radio amateurs who are now using the sensational FT8 digital communications mode.

Si amigos, I receive many radio related questions coming to the ASK ARNIE section of Dxers Unlimited...and they have helped me to learn more about the radio hobby, making possible to share with my listeners some very interesting findings.

Amigo Randall, from Utah, USA and yours truly have exchanged ideas about regenerative receivers we have built, that make possible excellent reception of the HF bands spanning from 4 to 12 megahertz.

So when I received a question asking about what could be considered to be the most rugged, reliable, easy to homebrew, that can be made from electronic components not hard to find, and even using recycled parts, I immediately started to work on the project, that has kept me busy all along the weekend reviewing my notebooks and going to the workshop to pick up half-finished receivers projects.

The new CO2KK shortwave receiver already has a  name, an acronymn, coming from the words RUGGED RELIABLE EASY TO BUILD RADIO.... RRETOBUILD...Sunday evening, I was already drawing by hand the schematic diagram and the parts list for the front end....

Yes, it is true that the worst HF bands propagation conditions of the past ten years are happening right now as day after day, one after the other the Sun shows no sunspots, and the solar flux stays hovering barely above the lowest ever recorded value of sixty six units.

You must look back to the tail end of cycle 23 between 2008 and 2009 to see a similar long spell of a blank Sun and solar flux levels at the baseline readings.

Again, it is confirmed that according to well-known heliophysicists that keep a close watch on the Sun, some new solar cycle sunspots have been seen, something that indicated we are nearing the transition between the very weak cycle 24 and what may be another also very weak cycle 25.

For some reason or other August seems to have become the international weekend for lighthouses. Countries all over the world have become involved in one or another of lighthouse activity.

In Britain the Association of Lighthouse Keepers, ALK, conducts International Lighthouse Heritage Weekend on the third full weekend in August. Their objective is to encourage Lighthouse managers, keepers and owners to open their lighthouse or light-station and related visitors centers, to the public with a view to raising the profile of lighthouses, light vessels and other navigational aids, and preserving the world's treasured maritime heritage.

The major event which takes place in August is the International Lighthouse Lightship Weekend, ILLW, which came into being in 1998 as the Scottish Northern Lights Award run by the Ayr Amateur Radio Group.

The ILLW takes place on the 3rd full weekend in August each year and attracts over 500 lighthouse entries located in over 40 countries including Cuban stations that will use the T4 prefix for the special event stations.

QSL on the air to the listeners that have recently sent e-mail messages to inforhc@enet.cu

Yes amigos, send your reports, comments and your radio hobby related questions to inforhc@enet.cu Catch those elusive, now rare, F2 layer propagation events during solar minimum years that occur during your local daytime hours.

Here is how to catch MORE of those band openings by using the scanning functions of digital radios to search for 10 meters amateur band beacons, operating from 28.2 to 28.3 megahertz. Plus, you can do like-wise by programming the 40 citizens bands channels and leave your radio connected to a quarter wave vertical ground plane omnidirectional antenna, ready to pick up any DX signals that may reach your location.

The bad news that continues to worry shortwave listener’s and amateur radio operators, is that there are no signs for improvement of shortwave propagation conditions ... and this, is WHY it is happening.

Solar flux is holding at very low 70 flux unit levels and zero sunspots in sight. Let me repeat the following:

SOLAR MINIMUM UPDATE: The sun has been without sunspots for more than 50 percent of the days of this year 2018. To find a similar stretch of blank suns, you have to go back to 2009, when the sun was experiencing the deepest solar minimum in a century. Solar minimum has returned, bringing with it extra cosmic rays entering into the Earth's upper atmosphere, long-lasting holes in the sun's atmosphere, and strangely pink auroras. And as expected the worst propagation conditions on the HF
bands above 10 megahertz in more than nine years.

Current propagation Conditions: 
Solar-terrestrial indices for 13 August. Solar flux 68 and estimated planetary A-index 5. The estimated planetary K-index at 1200 UTC on 14 August was 1. No space weather storms were observed for the past 24 hours. No space weather storms are predicted for the next 24 hours. 225 Issued Tuesday August 14, 2018 at 1345 UTC

Solar activity was very low.

The daily solar flux index numbers (DSFI) were 67.9 67.8 66.4

There had been eight consecutive days with a 2000 UTC daily solar flux index number (DSFI) less than 70.

The official daily sunspot number (DSSN) was 0.

There had been 45 of the past 48 days with an official daily sunspot number (DSSN) of 0.

In 2018 there had been 132 days with an official daily sunspot number (DSSN) of 0.

New sunspot may be showing up On Tuesday August 14, 2018 a new plage rose around the eastern limb of the sun located at approximately S08E55. There may be one tiny sunspot associated with the plage and it could be numbered later today if it survives.

 See you all at the weekend edition of Dxers Unlimited next Sunday and early Monday UTC days just after the top of the hour news...send your signal reports and comments about this and other Radio Havana Cuba's programs as well as your radio hobby related questions to inforhc@enet.dot.cu or via air mail. Send your postcards and letters to Arnie Coro, Radio Havana Cuba. Havana, Cuba.
(Arnie Coro/R Havana Cuba)



Animals and Insects ... in Radio

Deutsche Welle - Trincomalee, Sri Lanka
In our program today, we present another episode in the story of Animals and Insects in Radio.  Today’s program is Episode 3 in this three-part mini-series on the story of Animals and Insects in Radio, and on this occasion, we begin with a visit to the one-time Deutsche Welle Relay Station which is located near Trincomalee on the northeast coast of the island of Sri Lanka.


It was back in the early part of the year 1985 that our DX editor Adrian Peterson teamed up with the well-known shortwave radio personality Jonathan Marks from Radio Netherlands and his wife Marian for a five hour journey by car across the island of Sri Lanka from Colombo to Trincomalee.  The purpose for this journey through the sometimes-dangerous insurgency areas was for a visit to what was the Deutsche Welle relay station which had been installed in what had previously been a Royal Navy wireless communication station.

Following our inspection of the shortwave and mediumwave equipment in that very modern international radio broadcasting station, our tour guide at Deutsche Welle took us out into the massive antenna field.  He explained that there were occasions when a tribe of wild Asian Elephants had broken down the protective fence surrounding the antenna field and they then encroached onto the station property, sometimes causing damage to an aerial system.  

Then too he added, from time to time, a troop of wild monkeys has come parading through the area, swinging from the structural wires of the huge curtain antenna systems, though thus far, they had caused very little damage, and neither had any of them become electrocuted.

We should add that SLBC, the Sri Lanka Broadcasting Corporation, now operates the Trincomalee radio station, and that this our DX program Wavescan is regularly heard on shortwave from one of their four powerful 250 kW transmitters.

Then too, VOH the Voice of Hope in Zambia Africa has experienced a similar problem with monkeys invading their station property.  There are many wild monkeys that live in the trees surrounding the antenna field of their isolated shortwave station.  Sometimes they get so bold that they come right down onto the ground surrounding the transmitter buildings looking for food. 

A few months ago, the engineering staff discovered that the air temperature in the main transmitter building itself was getting dangerously high; and in addition, the industrial air conditioning unit was no longer working.  

When they investigated, they found that much of the insulating material surrounding the ducts from the compressors outside the back of the building had been stripped bare by the monkeys; and in addition, some of the electrical wiring had been broken off also.  When all had been repaired and replaced, they were careful to ensure that all of the outer surfaces were monkey-proofed.

Over in nearby India, Manosij Guha tells us in the 2002 edition of Larry Magne’s now defunct annual publication Passport to World Band Radio that a shortwave radio station in his country had a similar animal problem.  Manosij tells us that All India Radio AIR established a shortwave relay station near the small town of Aligarh some 60 miles east of New Delhi in 1971.

Initially this station, on its estate of more than 800 acres, contained two shortwave transmitters at 250 kW each, together with 39 antenna systems and 15 miles of feeder lines.  Manosij Guha stated that on several occasions nilgais, the large brown Indian antelope, have invaded the antenna farm and been electrocuted in the antenna field.

On two separate occasions in two widely separated countries, sheep have been the culprit in causing strange sounds in a radio transmission. 

The now silent shortwave station operated by Radio Australia in Victoria was installed on a property of 600 acres located at 490 Verney Road in what is now North Shepparton.  Although the property is located in what is described as sheep grazing country, currently the area is becoming somewhat built up with local housing.

At the height of its operational capacity, Radio Australia Shepparton contained seven shortwave transmitters; 4 @ 100 kW, 2 @ 50 kW, and 1 @ 10 kW.  On the antenna farm were 15 steel towers standing 210 ft high supporting 24 curtain antennas, with an additional four rhombic antennas for use in emergency occasions.

In its earlier usage in the postwar years, the growth of high grass in the antenna field became a problem due to the likelihood of fires during the hot dry summer.  So a flock of 850 sheep were obtained, Border Leicester cross with Merino, and they kept the grass down. 

On one occasion way back, apparently there was a meter in the transmitter hall at Shepparton that gave a strange erratic reading.  When the staff investigated outside, they discovered that one of the sheep was scratching an itch by rubbing itself against a feeder line pole.

Back towards the end of the year 1993, a similar event occurred in England.  It was reported that a government communication radio station at Scarborough in Yorkshire, Northern England was emitting strange high frequency noises.  An investigation revealed that sheep were rubbing against what they described as an aerial pole.

Back towards the end of the year 1993, Jonathan Marks (again!) in his DX program Media Network from Radio Netherlands shortwave told the story of how a school of shrimp put their station on the island of Bonaire in the Caribbean off the air.  The concentration of shrimp in the water pond clogged the water intake for the cooling system and the station had to be closed until the fish were cleared from the cooling equipment.  The abundance of shrimp in the wetlands and shoreland areas of Bonaire attracts the Pink Flamingo for which the island is quite famous.

The March 1999 issue of Contact, the monthly magazine from the World DX Club in England,  tells us another interesting story.  They state that the National Rivers Authority in Great Britain inserted a tiny radio transmitter into 450 salmon fish so that they could be tracked as they migrate up the River Hirnant in Wales.

At one stage, their mobile radio detector indicated that one of these fish had leaped out of the water and was moving across dry land.  The authorities tracked the mobile salmon with their radio receiver to the home of a fisherman, who confessed that he had been fishing without a license.

And finally, one for the birds!  This item happened back during the 1940s, and it is taken from a 1995 issue of the American radio journal, Radio World.

The incident that we refer to occurred at mediumwave station WBAA, which is still located at Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana.  At the time, the station was located in the Electrical Engineering Building, and the antenna was suspended between two towers that were part of the steel framework of the building.  These towers extended 88 feet above the top of the building and they supported a cage antenna made up of several parallel conductors each about seven inches apart.     

One summer afternoon back in the 1940s at about four o’clock, the meter on the transmitter indicated a gradual change in the antenna current.  The operator checked all systems, and everything seemed to be OK.  After half an hour with very low antenna readings, the meter reading began to improve until it slowly returned back to normal.

Next day, and on the following days, always at about the same time, the antenna reading began to deteriorate to a dangerously low level, and then gradually return to normal.  Now on Sundays, station WBAA was off the air, and on one occasion the operator happened to drive past the station at about the same time, four o’clock in the afternoon.

He was amazed to discover that the antenna was literally covered with Blackbirds, perched on the cross bars from one end of the antenna to the other.  In spite of the heavy construction of the antenna, it was sagging noticeably, enough to change the level of capacitance with the ground.

In addition, the effective increase in the size of the antenna with all of the birds upon it changed the impedance factor of the antenna.  This then was the cause for the low meter readings and the deterioration of the level of the transmitted signal.

Indeed, that cage antenna was actually … a bird cage antenna!
(AWR Wavescan/NWS 493)


Tuesday, August 14, 2018

Tribute to the island of Lombok


Because of the two major earthquakes that have struck the island of Lombok in Indonesia within a few days, we interrupt the regular flow of our topics here in Wavescan, and we present instead this feature item as a Tribute to Lombok.


Two major earthquakes have struck the island of Lombok just one week apart.  The first major strike, rated at 6.4, occurred on Sunday July 29 (2018) with a death toll of at least 17.  Several hundred tourists were stranded during a hike on the volcanic Mount Rinjani due to a massive landslide, though some found an alternate route down the slopes of the mountain while others were airlifted out by helicopter.

This first quake which struck around dawn, was also felt on the neighboring island of Bali.  American TV personality and cook book author Chrissy Teigen was on vacation with her husband and two children in Bali, and she tweeted about the initial impact of this first earthquake.  She described it as a massive earthquake.

 Australian actress Teresa Palmer was vacationing in a treehouse also on Bali with her husband and their two children and she described the tremor as violent and scary.  Teresa was noted for her recent role in the Mel Gibson block buster movie Hacksaw Ridge.  She played the part of the wife of the film’s dramatic hero Desmond Doss.

The second earthquake followed just a week later, on Sunday August 5 and it was even more violent than the earlier quake, and it measured at 7.0.  More than one hundred people have died on this second occasion.  A tsunami warning was issued, but the rise of ocean level was no more than six inches.     

At the time of the second quake, Indonesia and Australia were co-hosting an international
conference on regional security and counterterrorism on both Lombok and Bali.  Radio New Zealand International, or more correctly these days Radio New Zealand Pacific, reported that none of the delegates was injured in the earthquakes.

The volcanic mountains in Indonesia make a dramatic scene as viewed from high in the air while the passenger plane passes over the active volcanic islands in Indonesia, en-route from Perth in Western Australia to Singapore Island.  The pilot ensures that the plane is high above any airborne volcanic ash, and that he chooses a route over the ocean in between whatever are the less active volcanoes.  Indonesia’s second highest volcano, Mount Ranjani, at a little over 12,000 feet is located on Lombok.

The shape of the island of Lombok is like a five-sided pentagon with feet sticking out in the  southern corners. The island is 43 miles across, and it is located about half way between North Queensland and Singapore.  There is a shortage of fresh water on Lombok.

During the year 1257 historians tell us, there was a massive volcanic explosion on Lombok that is described as one of the very largest ever recorded on planet Earth.  As a result, Mt. Samalas volcanic explosion, weather patterns all around the world were altered. 

Since the early days of settlement on Lombok, feuding among various rulers and ethnic groups, have been a part of the local political scene.  The colonial Dutch authorities were invited to intervene in 1894.  Japanese forces arrived at 5:00 pm on Saturday May 9, 1942. When the Japanese left, the Dutch took over again; and then in 1958, the island of Lombok was incorporated into the newly independent Indonesia.

These days, Lombok Island has a population of 3.3 million, people  and the capital city of the island is Mataram with one-third million.

According to Alan Davies in England with his website Asiawaves, there are some 35 FM stations on the air on Lombok Island.  Radio Republic Indonesia RRI operates two program networks on FM with a total of seven FM transmitters, and also one lone mediumwave transmitter. 

It is extremely hard to find any printed information regarding the history of radio broadcasting on Lombok Island (or all of Indonesia for that matter); accurate and reliable information is almost
nonexistent.  Annual entries in the WR(TV)HB provide a useful guide, though even here, the editors have been dependent upon the monitoring observations of just a few, though quite reliable, international radio monitors.


After the end of World War II, amateur and commercial stations began to appear on the
broadcasting scene in Indonesia and like we say, reliable information regarding these stations is almost totally nonexistent.  The amateur broadcasters were known in the national language Bahasa Indonesia as amatir stations. 

They were not licensed amateur operators known as hams elsewhere throughout the world, but rather they were small, irregular licensed or unlicensed stations doing their best to provide a needed local radio broadcasting service.  These amatir radio broadcasting stations simply chose what they could find as an open channel in the tropical shortwave bands, and they were on the air with whatever programming they could find.

From the available information, we would suggest that the first radio broadcasting stations on the island of Lombok were installed by government authorities, sometime during the late 1950s. 

The first entry in the WR(TV)HB is for the year 1960, and the first and only station listed then operated with the callsign YDX with listed 1 kW on the tropical shortwave 90 m band frequency 3223 kHz. Though shown as 1 kW, the actual power of this transmitter was less than 100 watts. 

This original station carried the programming of RRI and the location is given as Mataram, the capital city.  Subsequent editions of the WR(TV)HB show two shortwave channels in use on Lombok and at this stage, RRI Mataram is listed with new callsigns.  The frequency 3223 kHz is shown as YDV5, and a new channel 3365 kHz is shown with the callsign YDV.  Both channels are listed at the same 1 kW, so this additional outlet would seem to be the same transmitter with just another channel at a different time.

The 1973 edition of WR(TV)HB shows the installation of an additional shortwave transmitter that was in use at either 1kW or 5 kW.  The 3223 kHz frequency continued at both power levels, with 1 kW during the day and 5 kW during the evenings.  The 1975  edition lists the power on two additional channels, the new 120 m band frequency on 2390 kHz and on also on 3365 kHz as just 60 watts each.

The 1975 issue also shows an additional new shortwave station on the air, this time at Selong on the other side of the island of Lombok, the east side.  This new station was another government
operated station with just 75 watts on the out of band frequency 2854 kHz with local RKPDK
programing. 

There’s a note in the 1975 edition of the WRTVHB stating that all commercial stations in
Indonesia were required to convert from shortwave to mediumwave by March 23, 1975.  However, many of the local commercial shortwave stations were still heard on shortwave after that date.

The usage of shortwave broadcasting by government stations on Lombok Island faded out around the turn of the millennium, with the 3225 kHz channel at Mataram as the final channel in use.  Both power levels of 1 kW and 5 kW were still in use up to that time.

The RRI mediumwave channel with 10 kW on 855 kHz was introduced in the mid 1970’s and it is still on the air to this day.  Supplementary RRI mediumwave stations were also on the air beginning in the 1990s on 1194 kHz and 1251 kHz, though these have since been transferred to the standard FM band.

Beginning in the 1980s, commercial and community radio broadcasting stations began to appear on the mediumwave band on Lombok Island, about half a dozen of them.  All of the  mostly low powered outlets, have since also transferred to the FM band.
(AWR/Wavescan/NWS 394)