Friday, December 02, 2016

Radio Free Asia continues their Anniversary QSL

a reminder to our readers.....this card's last day will be December 31, 2016

Radio Free Asia (RFA) announces its 20th anniversary QSL. Bringing free press to closed societies, RFA’s first broadcast was in Mandarin on September 29, 1996 at 2100 UTC. RFA is a private, nonprofit corporation broadcasting news and information to listeners in Asian countries where full, accurate, and timely news reports are unavailable. Acting as a substitute for indigenous free media, RFA concentrates coverage on events occurring in and/or affecting Burma, Cambodia, Laos, North Korea, the People’s Republic of China, and Vietnam.  RFA does not express editorial opinions but provides news, analysis, commentary, and cultural programming in the languages of the country of broadcast.  This design is RFA’s 62nd QSL and is used to confirm all valid reception reports from September – December 2016.

Created by Congress in 1994 and incorporated in 1996, RFA broadcasts in Burmese, Cantonese, Khmer, Korean to North Korea, Lao, Mandarin (including the Wu dialect), Vietnamese, Tibetan (Uke, Amdo, and Kham), and Uyghur. RFA strives for accuracy, balance, and fairness in its editorial content. As a ‘surrogate’ broadcaster, RFA provides news and commentary specific to each of its target countries, acting as the free press these countries lack. RFA broadcasts only in local languages and dialects, and most of its broadcasts comprise news of specific local interest.  More information about Radio Free Asia, including our current broadcast frequency schedule, is available at www.rfa.org. 

RFA encourages listeners to submit reception reports.  Reception reports are valuable to RFA as they help us evaluate the signal strength and quality of our transmissions. RFA confirms all accurate reception reports by mailing a QSL card to the listener.  RFA welcomes all reception report submissions at http://techweb.rfa.org (follow the QSL REPORTS link) not only from DX’ers, but also from its general listening audience. 

Reception reports are also accepted by email at qsl@rfa.org and by mail to:

          Reception Reports
          Radio Free Asia
          2025 M. Street NW, Suite 300
          Washington DC 20036
          United States of America. 
 (A.J. Janitschek/RFA) 

The following winter schedule is effective to 26 March 2017 

RFA Broadcast Frequency Schedules

All frequencies are kHz, 1 MegaHertz (MHz) is equal to 1000 kHz. Conversion to meter bands: Meters=300000/frequency in kHz. e.g.: 17705 kHz --> 16.9 meters

Burmese                  
0030-0130 UTC  12115 15700 17510
1230-1400 UTC  11795 12105 13735
1400-1430 UTC  11795 12105
Khmer                    
1230-1330 UTC  11750
2230-2330 UTC  11850
Korean                   
1500-1700 UTC   1188  5885  7210  9985
1700-1900 UTC   1188  5885  9985
2100-2200 UTC   7460  9860  9985
Lao                      
0000-0100 UTC  13685
1100-1200 UTC  13685
Mandarin                 
0300-0500 UTC  11980 15340 17660
0500-0700 UTC  11980 15340 17660 21700
1500-1600 UTC   7415  9790  9850
1600-1700 UTC   6120  7415  9455
1700-1900 UTC   7415  9455  9860
1900-2000 UTC   1098  5965  7415  9455  9860
2000-2100 UTC   1098  5965  7415  7445  9455  9590
2100-2200 UTC   1098  7415  9410  9455
2300-2400 UTC   9825  9900 11775
Tibetan                  
0100-0200 UTC   9670 11695 13795 15270 17750
0200-0300 UTC   9455  9670 11695 17525 17750
0600-0700 UTC  17675 17815 21480 21680
1000-1100 UTC   9690 15665 17830
1100-1200 UTC   7470  9940 11550
1200-1300 UTC   7470  9940 11555 12055 15375
1300-1400 UTC   7470  9940 12050 13650 15375
1500-1600 UTC   5875  9940 11660 11805
2200-2300 UTC   7470  7480  9890
2300-2400 UTC   5905  7470  7540  9535
Uyghur                   
0100-0200 UTC   7480  9450  9700  9740 13705
1600-1700 UTC   7545  7565 11720 11800
Vietnamese               
1400-1430 UTC   1503 11850 13735
1430-1500 UTC  11850 13735
(RFA/Janitschek)

Special Upcoming Special Program Schedules

Hi All,
As well as the special program about the Danish Shortwave Club International, which has been made by the Rhein Main Radio Club, and is listed for broadcast on 6145 kHz at 2000 UTC on the 17th of December via the Shortwave Service in Germany, and using the 100kW transmitter in Armenia, in this week's episode of Wavescan, Jeff White also said that there would be a number of broadcasts via WRMI too,  but will be in two parts rather one. I assume this will be the same one hour program, but broken up into two 30 minute segments instead, and broadcast a week apart.

The times and dates given by Jeff were as follows:
December 3rd 2300 5850.0 kHz Part One
December 3rd 2330 11580.0 kHz Part One
December 4th 2300 5850.0 kHz Part One
December 5th 0230 9955.0 kHz Part One
December 10th 2300 5850.0 kHz Part Two
December 10th 2330 11580.0 kHz Part Two
December 11th 2030 11580.0 kHz Part Two
December 11th 2300 5850.0 kHz Part Two
December 12th 0230 9955.0 kHz Part two

More info about this can be found on the EDXC website, including QSL details:
https://edxcnews.wordpress.com/2016/11/16/kw-radiosendung-uber-dswci-shortwave-broadcast/

This page also gives details via Victor Goonetilleke showing two more broadcasts to Asia, and one to Europe via SLBC:

SRI LANKA Victor Goonetilleke, Program Manager
To EUROPE :
Sat., 03. Dec. 2016 (UTC) from 1930-2030 UTC on 9715 KHz
(350 degrees; 125 Kilowatts)
—-
To JAPAN, Asia, Australia :
Sun., 04. Dec. 2016 (UTC) from 1000-1100 UTC on 11835 KHz
or
Sat., 03. Dec. 2016 (UTC) from 1000-1100 UTC on 11835 KHz
73 for now, Alan.
(BDXC)

From The Isle of Music December 5-6 schedule


FROM THE ISLE OF MUSIC NOW WITH THREE LISTENING OPTIONS!

On December 6 (December 5 local date in the Americas), our special guest will be the delightful Cuban violinist Tanmy López Moreno, who in addition to performing with Interactivo has her own project. We will feature music from her two albums. We will also play selections from 4/1, an award-winning album by Cuban concert pianist Fidel Leal. And to add a little something extra, some vintage Cuban Rock from Los Gafas.

Three options for listening on shortwave:
WBCQ, 7490 KHz, Tuesdays 0100-0200 UTC (8pm-9pm EDT Mondays in the Americas)
Channel 292, 6070 KHz, Tuesdays 1900-2000 UTC (2000-2100 CET) and (NEW) Fridays 1100-1200 UTC (1200-1300 CET)
See the NOTES section of our Facebook page for instructions for listening online if you are out of range or don’t have a shortwave radio.

(Bill Tilford/Tilford Productions)

December Specials from DX Stamp & Suppy Service

Dear Customers,

Below are specials for December 2016.
 If you need a current stamp list or supply list, I can mail or email it to you. 

FLASH!!    I have Christmas forever stamps available, Madonna & Child, for your Christmas mailings...If you'd like these, be sure to mention when ordering from offer listed below. ALSO! I can make up 47c in 2 stamps with Christmas stamps too!! Just mention when you order!

EXTRA FLASH!!!  First Class rate returns to 49c in mid-January!! Time to stock up. SPECIAL OFFER: 1000 Forever stamps = $470. FV   Offered at 85% of face at $399.50 plus $3.50 shipping. Total = $403.00!!!
 
NEWS!!!: European Air Return Envelopes.....SOLD OUT!!!  I will NOT be restocking. With lower sales, restocking would be a smaller qty. to purchase at a much higher cost...I will sell  the European PLAIN Returns in their place. See special deals below. A few customers are QSL managers and they tell me they rarely see an airmail envelope from overseas anyway, except maybe from JA. My supply of European Air Mailers is greater (about 12,000), so they will last longer. Take advantage of the European Air Mailer close out combo specials while I have them!!!  The red & blue airmail border isn't necessary for international mail anymore. All international mail goes by air, renamed First Class International a number of years ago.

MORE NEWS:  VENEZUELA has been dropped from stamp list. My Supplier can no longer obtain.

IDEA:  Slightly damaged Deluxe QSL Album   now $30.00 -or- buy 2 for only $55.00!!!

NEW RATES:
 If you hear of or notice any new rates, let me know.

NEW PRICES:  

 IN STOCK AGAIN:  AUSTRALIA

STAMPS ON BACK ORDER:

 U.S. DISCOUNT POSTAGE DEALS!!

Save Big on your domestic mailings 
 with colorful vintage stamps!
HAPPY  MAILING!!
47c Units
 Forever
 
 in  2 stamps
 
 in 5 stamps

x 100
 $45.00
 
 $40.00
  
x 200
 $85.00
 
 $65.00
 
  x 500
 $207.00
 
 $157.00
   
Payment by Credit card, check or money order for forever stamps and 47c units!
Bulk Postage Lots of sheets & singles
$200FV: $130 ppd     $500FV: $310. ppd
                             
No Charge for shipping Discount Postage Offers

DECEMBER 2016  DX  STAMP  SPECIALS
2 Germany-$2.60    2 Russia-$2.60    3 Japan-$3.90  
2 Italy-$7.00    2 UK-$3.00    2 France-$3.60    2 Spain-$4.00

DECEMBER 2016  DX  SUPPLY  SPECIALS
200/200 European Plain Mailers and Plain Returns - $40.00
200/200 European Air Mailers and Plain Returns - $40.00
European AIR Returns are SOLD OUT!!
5 Packs of Extra QSL Album pages - $22.00

DECEMBER 2016 CLOSE OUT SPECIALS
500 European Air Mailers - $39.00
200/200 Stateside mailers and Returns - $23.00
500/500 Stateside Mailers and Returns - $43.00
 
Priority Mail Shipping Rates: Orders up to $40.00 add $9.00, orders from $41.00 to $100.00 add $15.00. orders from $101.00 to $150.00 add $20.00, orders over $150.00 add 15%. When ordering supplies and stamps, the stamps ride free, just use supply total to figure shipping costs. Shipments to Canada and overseas ship at a greater cost. (07/2015 modified)

Stamps Only Orders: Just add $1.00 P&H for posting to USA, add $2.00 for posting to Canada.

73, bill
William Plum
12 Glenn Road
Flemington, NJ 08822
908 788 1020
Email: plumdx@msn.com


VOA Radiogram weekend schedule

Hello friends,
Last week’s transmission Sunday at 1930-2000 UTC on 15670 kHz again did not reach most of Europe -- for at least part of the show.  See the image above.

 The Saturday 0930-1000 broadcast on 5865 kHz also did not reach most of Europe. Please try again this weekend, because we never know when gray-line propagation will be favorable. This transmission should be audible throughout the Americas and might also be heard in the Asia-Pacific region.

This weekend’s VOA Radiogram includes one news item in Olivia 64-2000. This mode might provide a good decode even in conditions which result in an unsuccessful decode of our usual MFSK32 mode. Turn off Fldigi’s squelch (SQL) for best results in Olivia 64-2000.

And to keep the transmitter hum from mixing with the RSID, resulting in an incorrect center audio frequency, do this in Fldigi: Configure > IDs > ID > RsID > unselect (turn off) Searches passband.  Set the audio frequency at 1500 Hz. Any self-adjustment of the audio frequency by Fldigi will be no more than 200 Hz.

Here is the lineup for VOA Radiogram, program 192, 3-4 December 2016, all in the MFSK32 except where noted:

1:48  Program preview
2:59  U.S. Coast Guard looks to increased Asia-Pacific role*
8:47  Thomas Edison National Historical Park*
15:55  Olivia 64-2000: UK radio amateur's ISS project
22:16  MFSK32: Club Diexistas de la Amistad 40th anniversary*
27:07  Closing announcements*
* with image

Please send reception reports to radiogram@voanews.com.
VOA Radiogram transmission schedule
(all days and times UTC):
Sat 0930-1000 5865 kHz         (To the Americas, try also in Asia-Pacific and Europe)
Sat 1600-1630 17580 kHz       (To Europe, try also in the Americas and Asia-Pacific) 
Sun 0230-0300 5745 kHz        (To the Americas, try also in Europe)
Sun 1930-2000 15670 kHz      (To Europe, try also in the Americas and Asia-Pacific)
All via the Edward R. Murrow transmitting station in North Carolina.


The Mighty KBC broadcast to North America will be Sunday at 0000-0200 UTC (Saturday 7-9 pm EST) on 6145 kHz, via Germany. A minute of MFSK32 will be transmitted at about 0130 UTC. Reports to Eric: themightykbc@gmail.com . See also http://www.kbcradio.eu/ and https://www.facebook.com/TheMightyKbc/ .  

DigiDX has a new transmission schedule, both via WRMI Florida:
Sunday 2030-2100 UTC on  11580Khz (Targeted at Europe)
Sunday 2330-2400 UTC on 11580kHz (For North and South America)

See http://www.digidx.uk/ and https://www.facebook.com/digidx/

Italian Broadcasting Corporation (IBC) has digital modes as follows:
EVERY WEDNESDAY ON 3975 KHZ 20.30-21.00 UTC in MFSK32 and OLIVIA 16-500
EVERY FRIDAY ON 9955 KHZ 02.25-02.30 UTC in MFSK32
EVERY SATURDAY ON 1584 KHZ 21.25-21.30 UTC in MFSK32
EVERY SUNDAY ON 7730 KHZ 00.55-01.00 UTC in MFSK32
EVERY SUNDAY ON 6070 KHZ 11.30-12.00 UTC  in MFSK32 and OLIVIA 16-500 (VIA RADIO BCLNEWS)
For the complete IBC transmission schedule, including voice broadcasts, visit  http://ibcradio.webs.com/

Thank you for your reception reports from last weekend.
I am compiling a gallery of Denali images and hope to start sending it out this weekend.
I hope you can tune in and write in this weekend.
Kim Andrew Elliott, KD9XB
Producer and Presenter
VOA Radiogram
voaradiogram.net
Twitter: @VOARadiogram  (especially active just before, during, and after broadcasts)

PS: For information about the transmitters and antennas used for VOA Radiogram, see …
http://voaradiogram.net/post/47627164533/voa-radiogram-some-details-about-the-transmitters

Monday, November 28, 2016

Weekly PropagationForecast Bulletins


Product: Weekly Highlights and Forecasts
:Issued: 2016 Nov 28 0341 UTC
# Prepared by the US Dept. of Commerce, NOAA, Space Weather Prediction Center
# Product description and SWPC web contact  www.swpc.noaa.gov/weekly.html
#
#                Weekly Highlights and Forecasts
#
Highlights of Solar and Geomagnetic Activity 21 - 27 November 2016

Solar activity was at very low levels. The largest flare of the period was at B6 at 22/0010 UTC from Region 2612 (N09, L=194, class/area Hax/230 on 25 November). No Earth-directed CMEs were
observed.
No proton events were observed at geosynchronous orbit. The greater than 2 MeV electron flux at geosynchronous orbit was moderate levels on 22-24 November while high levels were reached on
21 and 25-27 November. The largest flux of the period was 25,245 pfu at 27/1625 UTC.

Geomagnetic field activity ranged from quiet to G2 (Moderate) geomagnetic storm conditions. Enhanced geomagnetic activity was due to recurrent, positive-polarity, coronal hole high speed streams (CH HSS). The period began with solar wind speeds near 330 km/s on 21 November with an increasing total field from approximately 1 nT early in the period to near 12 nT by 22 November and a fluctuating Bz component between +10 nT and -8 nT. Solar wind speed increased, thereafter, to near 510 km/s by 23 November while total field decreased to near 3 nT. Another enhancement in total field was observed late on 23 November to a maximum near 11 nT on 24 November before decreasing to 5 nT by 25 November. Stepped increases in solar wind speed occurred at 24/0514 UTC from 400 km/s to 500 km/s and at 25/0144 UTC from 500 km/s to near 700 km/s. The geomagnetic field responded with quiet to unsettled levels on 21 November, quiet to active levels on 22-23 November, unsettled to G1 (Minor) storm levels on 24 November, unsettled to G2 (Moderate) storm levels on 25 November and quiet to unsettled levels on 26-27 November.

Forecast of Solar and Geomagnetic Activity 28 November - 24 December 2016

Solar activity is expected to be at very low levels with a slight chance for C-class flares for the forecast period.  No proton events are expected at geosynchronous orbit. The greater than 2 MeV electron flux at geosynchronous orbit is expected to be at normal to moderate levels with high levels likely on 28 November-07 December, 10-18 December and again on 22-24 December due to recurrent CH HSS influence.  Geomagnetic field activity is expected to be at quiet to unsettled
levels on 28-30 November as the geomagnetic field recovers from positive polarity CH HSS activity. Unsettled to active levels are expected from 07-11 December and 19-24 December with G1 (Minor)
geomagnetic storm levels likely on 10 and 21-22 December due to recurrent CH HSS effects.

Product: 27-day Space Weather Outlook Table 27DO.txt
:Issued: 2016 Nov 28 0341 UTC
# Prepared by the US Dept. of Commerce, NOAA, Space Weather Prediction Center
# Product description and SWPC web contact www.swpc.noaa.gov/wwire.html#
#      27-day Space Weather Outlook Table
#                Issued 2016-11-28
#
#   UTC      Radio Flux   Planetary   Largest
#  Date       10.7 cm      A Index    Kp Index
2016 Nov 28      84           8          3
2016 Nov 29      83           8          3
2016 Nov 30      83           8          3
2016 Dec 01      80           5          2
2016 Dec 02      80           5          2
2016 Dec 03      80           5          2
2016 Dec 04      82           5          2
2016 Dec 05      82           5          2
2016 Dec 06      80           5          2
2016 Dec 07      80          15          4
2016 Dec 08      78          12          4
2016 Dec 09      78          18          4
2016 Dec 10      78          20          5
2016 Dec 11      78          10          3
2016 Dec 12      80           5          2
2016 Dec 13      80           5          2
2016 Dec 14      82           5          2
2016 Dec 15      82           5          2
2016 Dec 16      80           5          2
2016 Dec 17      80           5          2
2016 Dec 18      78           8          3
2016 Dec 19      78          12          4
2016 Dec 20      80          16          4
2016 Dec 21      80          22          5
2016 Dec 22      80          30          5
2016 Dec 23      82          12          4
2016 Dec 24      82          10          3
(NOAA)

Saturday, November 26, 2016

BREAKING NEWS: Former Cuban Leader Fidel Castro Dies at Age 90

Fidel Castro/photo via Fox News)
Longtime Cuban leader Fidel Castro, the bearded, cigar-smoking Communist revolutionary who infuriated the United States, inspired both loyalty and loathing from his countrymen and maintained an iron grip on Cuban politics for almost 50 years, died Friday at the age of 90.

Castro, who was the only leader most of his countrymen ever knew, outlasted 11 US presidents since he first took power in 1959.

Castro had been in declining health for years – he continued to spew his anti-American tirades almost until the end.
In October, 2014, Castro reprinted a New York Times editorial in state-run media that argued that the U.S. embargo on Cuba should end. The editorial ran almost verbatim, omitting one line about Cuba’s release of political prisoners.

Additional Story at:
http://www.foxnews.com/world/2016/11/26/former-cuban-leader-fidel-castro-dies-at-age-90.html

Monitoring Radio Havana Cuba on shortwave

B16-Winter Schedule Effective to 26 March 2017

All times UTC
Arabic
1900-1930 15140na
2030-2100 15370eu

Creole
0100-0130 5040sa
1930-2000 15140na
2300-2330 17730na

English
0000-0100 5040va   6165na
0100-0200 6000na   6165na
0200-0300 6000na   6165na
0300-0400 6000na  6165na
0400-0500 6000na   6165na
0500-0600 6000na   6060na   6100na   6165na
0600-0700 5040va   6000na   6060na   6100na   6165na
2000-2100 15140na
2200-2300 11880af
2300-0000 11880af

Esperanto
0700-0730 6100na
1600-1630 11760va
2230-2300 17730sa

French
0130-0200 5040va
1930-2000 15370eu
2100-2130 11880af  15140na
2230-2300 17730sa

Portuguese
2000-2030 15370eu
2130-2200 11880af
2300-0000 15230sa
2330-0000 17730sa

Quechua
0000-0030 17730sa

Spanish
0000-0100 6000na  6060na 6075am 9535ca 11670sa 11760va  11840sa   11950na  13740sa   15230sa
0100-0200 6060na 6075am 9535ca 11670sa 11760va  11840sa   13740sa   15230sa
0200-0300 5040am  6060na 6075am 9535ca 11670sa 11760va  11840sa   13740sa   15230sa
0300-0400 5040am  6060na 6075am 9535ca 11670sa 11840sa  13740sa   15230sa
0400-0500 5040am  6060na 6075am 9535ca 11670sa 11840sa  13740sa 15230sa
0500-0600 5040am  6075am 9535ca  11840sa 15230sa
0600-0700 11840sa 15230sa
1200-1300 9640am 9710na 9820ca   9850na   11760va  11840na   17580sa   17730sa   17750sa
1300-1400 9640am 9710na 9820ca   9850na   11760va  11840na   17580sa   17730sa 17750sa
1400-1500 9550ca 9640am 9710na   9820ca   11760va   15370na  17580sa   17730sa   17750sa
1500-1600 9640am 11760va 15370na   17730sa
1600-1700 11760va
1700-1800 11760va
1800-1900 11760va
2200-2300 5040va  6075am 9535ca 11760va   11840sa  13740sa   15370eu
2300-0000 5040va  6000na  11670sa 11840sa   11950na  15230sa   13740sa  15370eu
(Arnie Coro B16)

Target areas:
af (Africa)
am (America's)
eu (Europe)
na (North America)
sa (South America)
va (various areas)

Radio Progreso from Cuba on shortwave in Spanish, 4765 kHz; 0030-0400. Medium wave in Spanish, 24 hours 660, 720, 730, 820, 880, and 940 kHz.


Radio Rebelde from Cuba on shortwave n Spanish, 5025, 24 hours; Medium wave in Spanish 24 hours; 610, 670, 820, 1180, 1210 and 1620 kHz.

Radio Reloj from Cuba, on medium wave in Spanish 24 hours on 570, 610, 790, 850, 860, 870, and 950 kHz.
(Gayle Van Horn W4GVH/International Shortwave Broadcast Guide-Winter 2016)


Tuesday, November 22, 2016

Weekly Propagation Forecast Bulletins


Product: Weekly Highlights and Forecasts
:Issued: 2016 Nov 21 0507 UTC
# Prepared by the US Dept. of Commerce, NOAA, Space Weather Prediction Center
# Product description and SWPC contact http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/weekly.html
#
#                Weekly Highlights and Forecasts
#
Highlights of Solar and Geomagnetic Activity 14 - 20 November 2016
Solar activity was very low through the period with only a few low-level B-class flares observed from Regions 2610 (N16, L=018, class/area Dao/050 on 17 November), and 2611 (N03, L=291, class/area Cao/020 on 18 November). No Earth-directed coronal mass ejections (CME) were observed in available satellite imagery during the reporting period.  No proton events were observed at geosynchronous orbit. The greater than 2 MeV electron flux at geosynchronous orbit was at high levels throughout the period (14-20 November). The maximum flux of 19,442 pfu was observed at 15/1530 UTC.
Geomagnetic field activity was at quiet to unsettled levels on 14-15 November in response to waning influence from a negative polarity coronal hole high speed stream (CH HSS). Solar wind speed steadily decreased from a peak of 681 km/s to period ending values below 400 km/s. Total field ranged between 1 and 7 nT while the Bz component reached a maximum southward deviation of -6 nT. Quiet conditions were observed on 16-20 November under an ambient solar wind environment.

Forecast of Solar and Geomagnetic Activity 21 November - 17 December 2016
Solar activity is expected to be at very low levels with a slight chance for C-class flares over the forecast period.  No proton events are expected at geosynchronous orbit. The greater than 2 MeV electron flux at geosynchronous orbit is expected to be at normal to moderate levels with high levels likely on 22 November - 07 December, and 10-17 December due to recurrent CH HSS influence.
Geomagnetic field activity is expected to be at unsettled to active levels on 21-29 November and 07-11 December, with G1 (Minor) geomagnetic storm levels likely on 22-24 November, due to recurrent CH HSS effects.

Product: 27-day Space Weather Outlook Table 27DO.txt
:Issued: 2016 Nov 21 0507 UTC
# Prepared by the US Dept. of Commerce, NOAA, Space Weather Prediction Center
# Product description and SWPC contact http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/wwire.html#
#      27-day Space Weather Outlook Table
#                Issued 2016-11-21
#
#   UTC      Radio Flux   Planetary   Largest
#  Date       10.7 cm      A Index    Kp Index
2016 Nov 21      75           8          3
2016 Nov 22      78          20          5
2016 Nov 23      80          35          5
2016 Nov 24      80          30          5
2016 Nov 25      80          20          4
2016 Nov 26      82          12          4
2016 Nov 27      82          10          3
2016 Nov 28      82           8          3
2016 Nov 29      82           8          3
2016 Nov 30      82           5          2
2016 Dec 01      82           5          2
2016 Dec 02      84           5          2
2016 Dec 03      84           5          2
2016 Dec 04      84           5          2
2016 Dec 05      80           5          2
2016 Dec 06      80           5          2
2016 Dec 07      80          15          4
2016 Dec 08      78          12          4
2016 Dec 09      76          18          4
2016 Dec 10      76          20          4
2016 Dec 11      76          10          3
2016 Dec 12      76           5          2
2016 Dec 13      76           5          2
2016 Dec 14      76           5          2
2016 Dec 15      75           5          2
2016 Dec 16      75           5          2
2016 Dec 17      75           5          2
(NOAA)

Sunday, November 20, 2016

European Music Radio Tonight via the Internet

EMR will repeat this months Transmission via two streams running at the following Times:16.00, 18.00, 20.00 UTC

http://nednl.net:8000/emr.m3u will be on 96 kbps /44 KHz stereo for normal listening

http://nednl.net:8000/emr24.m3u will be 24 kbps / 22 KHz mono will be especially for low bandwidth like mobile phones.


Good Listening!
73s
Tom

European Music Radio:
website: www.europeanmusicradio.com
email:    emrshortwave@gmail.com

Saturday, November 19, 2016

Shortwave Relay Schedules


Hamburger Lokal Radio via Shortwave Station Göhren, Germany with 1KW to Western Europe:
6190 KHz     Every Saturday      07.00 to 11.00 UTC
7265 KHz     Every Saturday      11.00 to 16.00 UTC    
9485 KHz     Every Sunday        10.00 to 13.00 UTC     
Contact email: redaktion@hamburger-lokalradio.de

European Music Radio via;
WBCQ to Central & North America on 7490 KHz on 19th November between 22.00 to 23.00 UTC
Contact email: emrshortwave@gmail.com
Internet Repeats on 20th November 2016:
EMR will repeat this months Transmissions via two streams running at the following Times:16.00, 18.00, 20.00 UTC
http://nednl.net:8000/emr.m3u will be on 96 kbps /44 KHz stereo for normal listening
http://nednl.net:8000/emr24.m3u will be 24 kbps / 22 KHz mono will be especially for low bandwidth like mobile phones.

Radio City via:
IRRS to Europe on 9510 KHz (every Saturday) between 09.00 to 10.00 UTC
IRRS to Europe on 7290 KHz (every 3rd Friday) between 19.00 to 20.00 UTC
Challenger Radio to Northern Italy on 1368 KHz every Saturdays from 20.00 UTC onwards
Radio Merkurs on 1485 KHz Every Saturday between 20.00 onwards
Contact email: citymorecars@yahoo.ca

KBC via:
Media Broadcast to America on 6145 KHz Every Sunday between 00.00 to 01.00
Contact email: themightykbc@gmail.com

Hobart Radio via:
Channel 292 to Western Europe on 6070 KHz Sundays between 21.00 to 21.30 UTC
WRMI to Americas, Asia/Pacific on 9955 KHz Sunday between 03.30 to 04.00 UTC
WRMI to Americas, Asia/Pacific on 9955 KHz Tuesday between 22.30 to 23.00 UTC
WBCQ to North America on 5130 KHz Mondays 03.30 to 04.00 UTC
Unique Radio to North Australia Fridays at 08.00 & 14.00 UTC
Unique Radio to North Australia Saturdays at 07.30 & 14.30 UTC
Contact email: hriradio@gmail.com
For outside the listening area please try the Twente/Netherlands Web RX at http://websdr.ewi.utwente.nl:8901/
You can also hear many European free and alternative stations via the Internet at: http://laut.fm/jukebox
Radio Channel 292  Transmission schedules on 6070 KHz (on the air every day):   http://www.channel292.de/schedule-for-bookings/ 
Radio Mi Amigo Transmission schedules:   www.radiomiamigo.es/shortwave
Good Listening!
73s
Tom Taylor

European Music Radio:
website: www.europeanmusicradio.com
email:    emrshortwave@gmail.com

Sunday programming from VOA Radiogram

Hello friends,
I forgot to mention last week that for listeners in most of North America, VOA Radiogram is now on one hour earlier by local time, now that Daylight time has reverted to Standard time. The UTC times are the same.

 Last week’s broadcast Sunday at 1930-2000 UTC on 15670 kHz was again inaudible in Europe. But, again, it provided good text and images to the western USA.

Possible solutions to the poor 15670 kHz would be a change to a 13 or maybe 11 MHz frequency at the same 1930 UTC time.

Or a change of broadcast time to dawn in Europe, around 0500 or 0600 UTC, probably on a frequency near 6 MHz.

I am also considering a change the Sunday 0230-0300 UTC frequency to dusk in North Carolina, around 2300 UTC, for maximum night-time propagation to the east.

 Please let me know if you have any thoughts about changing VOA Radiogram times and frequencies.

This weekend, we will try an experiment suggested by Roger in Germany.

As you know, the transmitter hum, most pronounced at 360 Hz, has mixed with the RSID, resulting in the Fldigi RxID flipping the audio frequency to ~1140 Hz rather than the correct ~1500 Hz.

 Roger suggested transmitting “nonsense data” at 360 Hz, in addition to the primary data at 1500 Hz, to see if it prevents the intermodulation that causes the incorrect audio frequency. Or maybe it will make it worse. In any case, this should be fun.

Please follow this procedure for this weekend’s VOA Radiogram:

 1.     Configure > IDs > ID > RsID > select Searches passband

2.     At 1:45 into the show, observe if RxID changes center frequency to 1140 Hz rather than the correct 1500 Hz. Change it back to 1500 Hz if necessary

3.     At 2:30, during the program preview, BPSK63F (PSK63F) at 360 Hz, reduced by 15 dB, no RSID, with the VOA Radiogram transmission schedule, will begin.

4.     At 2:56, the mode changes to Olivia 64-2000, with RSID. Observe if the audio frequency stays at the correct 1500 Hz or changes to 1140 Hz.  Change the frequency back to 1500 Hz if necessary.

5.     At 10:03, the mode changes back to MFSK32, with RSID.  Observe if the audio frequency stays at the correct 1500 Hz or changes to 1140 Hz. Change the frequency back to 1500 Hz if necessary.

6.     At 13:02, the BPSK63F at 360 Hz will end.

 Here is the lineup for VOA Radiogram, program 190, 19-20 November 2016, all in MFSK32 except where noted:

1:45  Program preview

 2:56  Olivia 64-2000: FUNcube enters amateur service

10:03  MFSK32: China increases Internet control*

17:29  Freedom House global Internet freedom report*

26:34  Closing announcements*
* With image


Please send reception reports to

VOA Radiogram transmission schedule
(all days and times UTC):
Sun 0230-0300 5745 kHz
Sun 1930-2000 15670 kHz
All via the Edward R. Murrow transmitting station in North Carolina.

 Radio Pushka (Радио Пушка) will broadcast via Channel 292, Germany, 6070 kHz, Sunday, 20 November, at 2000-2100 UTC. MFSK32 will start at 2052 UTC, followed by one experiment with Feld Hell, then SSTV Scottie 1 mode (2 pictures). See http://radiopushka.blogspot.ru/2016/11/the-hell-digi-schedule-20112016.html .

 The Mighty KBC will broadcast to North America Sunday at 0000-0200 UTC (Saturday 7-9 pm EST) on 6145 kHz, via Germany. A minute of MFSK32 will be transmitted at about 0130 UTC. Reports to Eric: themightykbc@gmail.com . See also http://www.kbcradio.eu/ and https://www.facebook.com/TheMightyKbc/ .  

DigiDX has a new transmission schedule, both via WRMI Florida:

Sunday 2030-2100 UTC on  11580Khz (Targeted at Europe)
Sunday 2330-2400 UTC on 11580kHz (For North and South America)


Italian Broadcasting Corporation (IBC) has digital modes as follows:
EVERY WEDNESDAY ON 3975 KHZ 20.30-21.00 UTC in MFSK32 and OLIVIA 16-500
EVERY FRIDAY ON 9955 KHZ 02.25-02.30 UTC in MFSK32
EVERY SATURDAY ON 1584 KHZ 21.25-21.30 UTC in MFSK32
EVERY SUNDAY ON 7730 KHZ 00.55-01.00 UTC in MFSK32
EVERY SUNDAY ON 6070 KHZ 11.30-12.00 UTC  in MFSK32 and OLIVIA 16-500 (VIA RADIO BCLNEWS)

For the complete IBC transmission schedule, including voice broadcasts, visit http://ibcradio.webs.com/

 Thank you for your reception reports (or reports of attempted reception) from last weekend. 

 I hope you can tune in and write in this weekend.
Kim Andrew Elliott
Producer and Presenter
VOA Radiogram
voaradiogram.net
Twitter: @voaradiogram  (especially active before, during, and after broadcasts)



Wednesday, November 16, 2016

DXers Unlimited: Week of November 15

Radio Havana Cuba
Dxers Unlimited middle of the week edition for Tuesday 15 November 2016
By Arnie Coro
radio amateur CO2KK

Hola amigos radioaficionados all around the world now listening to the  middle of the week edition of Dxers Unlimited, our station's twice  weekly radio hobby program. I am your host Arnie Coro,radio amateur  CO2KK and here is now our number one topic for today... How you can make  yourself a small but efficient vertical antenna for your amateur radio station... It is just 12 foot tall... that is a little more than three  and half meters... My multiband small vertical does require the use of at least 4 ground radials... and if installed on top of a mast, if will benefit a lot from the use of elevated sloping radials.

It works nicely on the 15, 12 and 10 meters band without needing a loading coil or capacity hat. As a matter of fact on those three amateur bands the antenna is fed with 50 ohms coaxial cable that ends up into my classic PI network antenna tuner and standing wave ratio meter ... My demonstration to visitors of CO2KK and CL2ROX, our home amateur radio station is to set up Arnie Coro's KK5 portable vertical at our beautiful sun deck... This takes just a few minutes, and when fed into a multi
band HF transceiver... it is very easy to tune up on 15, 12 and 10 meters after laying the 4 radials on the ceramic tiles roofing ... Next step is to show how to use the antenna on the queen of Dxing band... 20 meters... and it only requires to disconnect the center conductor of the coaxial cable, and add a simple loading coil that has several taps... so the antenna can be tuned to the 20, 30 and 40 meters bands...

The aluminum tubing used for the antenna is split into three parts to make it really portable... but for a permanent installation I will suggest using just two sections... a larger diameter base section using
25 millimeters or 1 inch diameter tubing and the upper section using 19 millimeters of three quarters of an inch tubing... The antenna designed for a permanent installation is very rugged and proved to pass the 2005 Wilma hurricane test winds without any problems.

Building the portable version I found out that it was possible to use a car antenna stainless steel whip, that is attached to the main one and a half meter high base section using butterfly nuts, so it is very easy to assemble and take apart. The loading coil consists of a length of 2 inches or 50 millimeters diameter PVC water pipe that supports the winding of 20 turns of number 14 PVC  insulated wire to which taps every 5 turns are carefully made... I use a standard cable clamp to connect the antenna loading coil to the right place where resonance is achieved on the 20, 30 and 40 meter bands, easily found with the help of the friendly grid dip meter.. Good connections between the shield of the coaxial cable and the ground radials is a must !!!

The KK5 short vertical seems to put my QRP 5 WATTS station very well on the air on the 10,12,15 and 20 meter bands... and although it works on 30 and 40 meters testing against half wave dipoles for those two bands show that the KK5 is about minus 3 to minus 6 dB when compared with the above mentioned horizontal half wave dipoles...Total cost of the project will not break your bank account, and the antenna can be stored into a canvas back together with the RG58 coaxial cable, the set of radials and the loading coil... I took the prototype to the beach and results on the 20 meters band confirmed that although the antenna is shorter than a quarter wave vertical, it did brought in many contacts especially during the late afternoon and early evening when the best band openings were
happening...

More about low cost antennas for you ham radio station in future editions of Dxers Unlimited.... Now standby for a few seconds ... a station ID will follow. I am Arnie Coro, radio amateur CO2KK in sunny La Habana . Cuba

This is Radio Havana Cuba, the name of the show is Dxers Unlimited and  our e'mail address for signal reports, comments and radio hobby related  questions is inforhc at enet dot cu, again inforhc at enet.dot cu.. Now  here is item two of today's show...Northern hemisphere winter season  propagation is now in full swing... but something unusual is  happening... I am monitoring more frequent sporadic E layer events than what is considered to be normal during the first half of November...
Maybe we will see a more active sporadic E winter season starting in  around a month from now.... Sporadic E layer propagation is capable of generating band openings on the 12, 10 and 6 meter bands, plus very interesting short skip openings on 20 and 17 meters.. I will be monitoring the six meters band SSB voice calling frequencies of 50.110 and 50.125  using a short version of the TTFD antenna that works from 25 to 100 megaHertz... It can also be connected to a scanner that makes possible to explore the segment known as low band VHF, between 30 and 50 megaHertz...

Now item three:  ASK ARNIE, la numero uno, the most popular section of  Dxers Unlimited is now on the air ... answering a question sent by  listener Mark from Vancouver, Canada... Mark wants to know more about kits of parts that are presently available to assemble amateur radio single band transceivers. Well amigo Mark, I am happy to report that  there are several QRP rigs kits that are within the power range of 1 to 10 watts... The really wonderful thing about well designed kits is that
they come with all the parts, and with normally well written step by step instructions and also with fault finding information...You do need amigo Mark to be able to identify all electronic components, have a good eyesight , know how to properly solder parts and own a minimum set of measuring instruments, plus a high quality soldering iron... Attempting to assemble a ham band transceiver for the frequency range from 160 to 10 meters if attempted for the first time will require the help of a
more experienced radio amateur that has already succesfully assembled  the same kit you are trying to assemble... I do not recommend trying to  build your own single band HF transceiver from scratch, as you may end   up stuck into problems like not finding specific parts, and that is one every important fact about well done kits.... they do come will all parts  properly identified , show how to wind coils or toroids if required, will tell you how to check your progress and above all the really good kits will come with very well written in plain language step by step instructions, and also with vitally important debugging procedures...

Some suppliers of QRP transceiver kits will even provide for expert advice for troubleshooting your radio in case something goes wrong...

Now our next radio hobby related item... an item not frequently heard here in my show.. Si amigos, yes my friends I very rarely provide frequencies of stations and times to listen for one very solid
reason.... WHAT you are able to pick up at your location maybe quite different from what I can listen to here at my Havana, Cuba location...you can try to follow my advice about how to find out new and
possibly rare DX stations on the AM medium wave broadcast band by following this steps... number one keep a daily record of the geomagnetic planetary disturbance indicator ... be especially aware when the A index moves above 10 units... Also if you can find out a reliable source that will show the  D layer absorption index, this is an excellent indicator to follow , because lower values will really help to boost the AM medium wave band and the two lower Tropical Bands signals.
To explain it better lower ionospheric absorption from 500 kiloHertz to around three thousand three hundred kiloHertz will certainly increase your chances of picking up the weaker AM broadcast band and the 120 and 90 meters Tropical Band. The lower figure is also a good help to 160 meters band amateur signals !!!

Be aware that any geomagnetic disturbance in progress will require your immediate attention, especially starting just before sunset....

Now at the end of the show a short form propagation update ... solar activity continues to be at very low with the 10 dot seven centimeters wavelength solar flux hovering around 75 units ... See you all at weekend edition of Dxers Unlimited, next Sunday and Monday UTC days just after the top of the hour news here at Radio Havana Cuba
(Arnie Coro)

DXers Unlimited: November 13


Radio Havana Cuba
Dxers Unlimited weekend edition for Sunday 13 November 2016
By Arnie Coro
radio amateur CO2KK
Hola amigos radioaficionados all around the world and orbiting planet Earth... I am Arnaldo, Arnie, Coro radio amateur CO2KK, your host here at the weekend edition of Dxers Unlimited. Yes, this is your favorite radio hobby program and here is item one.... A snapshot of solar activity that shows very clearly how cycle 24 continues its track towards the upcoming solar minimum... So far this year 2016, we have experienced 23 days of zero sunspots ... and this data was taken on Thursday 10 November... when I started to write the script for this weekend show... Solar activity continues to be very low, so it may happen that when the this program goes ont  air we may have observed at least one more day of a blank Sun... Last year our nearest star was at a much more active state, so every single day of 2015 saw at least one sunspot group registered by solar optical astronomers....
Item two: I am very happy to see how much interest is generated among Dxers Unlimited's listeners every time a home building of radios topic is presented... Interaction with listeners that have built and tested some project published here has provided excellent feedback to improve some designs...

Aiming at making possible to build at home radio receivers and transmitters, I decided to lay out a set of rules... with the number one of them all stating that the circuits designs should only use electronic parts that are presently available in most countries around the world. That  limitation led to looking at recycling as the main source of parts, something that has proven to be quite effective... Just to give you an example... there is an ever increasing amount of what may be described as electronic junk that should be taken apart to enrich your parts bins... My most recent adquisitions were two computer UPS units that could not be repaired because of the fact that they used some rare integrated circuits that could not be found... Nevertheless the two units provided two excellent rugged well built power transformers, high current silicon rectifiers, several high power MOSFET devices and many other small parts, plus the line cords, fuse boxes and the metal cabinet.... One of the two units was easily converted into an excellent battery charger to keep a pair of high ampere hour rating lead acid batteries at maximum charge by means of a float charging circuit... The other UPS had its power transformer and all other parts inside removed and the well built metal cabinet will soon be hosting a nice 2 vacuum tubes linear power amplifier for an amateur radio station... Just take a look around and see if at home or at work you may find old electronic equipment that may be stripped of many parts before sending them to a recycler...

Now item three:  ASK ARNIE... la numero uno, the number one most popular section of this show is now on the air answering listener Mario from Mexico City who is very concerned about the extremely high background noise level at his apartment building... Mario says in his e'mail that it is next to impossible to tune in but the most powerful AM Mexico City stations... and reception from 2 megaHertz all the way to the top end of the amateur ten meters band is also blocked by very high noise levels when he uses his rooftop two sets of nests of dipoles antennas for the 80, 40, 30, 20, 17, 15 , 12 and 10 meters bands. Antenna one has the 80, 40 , 30 and 20 meters dipoles in parallel , fed by means of a one to one balun, while Antenna two has parallel dipoles for the 17, 15, 12 and 10 meters bands...also fed via a very well built one to one balun ferrite core transformer.   Mario adds that he is using on the higher frequency bands nest of dipoles a special double shield coaxial cable that when installed proved to be picking up less noise than the typical RG213 50 ohms coaxial cable previously used... He says that his low frequency bands nest of dipoles rooftop antenna is practically useless because it picks up a tremendous amount of noise... Mario ends his very well documented e'mail by asking me to recommend an antenna that could help him deal with the very high noise level present at his location...  In a few seconds I will be answering the question, jus after a short break for a station ID

This is Radio Havana Cuba, the name of the show is Dxers Unlimited, and here is the reply to listener Mario's question about what antenna types could help him deal with his very high noise level... Amigo Mario there are two antennas that have proven to be quite effective at locations that have very high radio frequency broadband noise levels... One , you have heard about it here at Dxers Unlimited countless number of times... I am talking about a well built Tilted Terminated Folded Dipole that for the frequency range from 6 to 30 megaHertz will need to be about 16 meters overall length... In order to be really effective the best way to install it is a sloping antenna, with a tilt angle of between 30 and 45 degrees... So the TTFD will need less space than its 16 meters overall length to work properly... All I can say is that although the TTFD does introduce a certain amount of power loss when transmitting, a side by side comparison with a half wave dipole cut for a specific operating frequency always shows that the TTFD is a much quieter antenna... Looking at the baseline of a spectrum analyzer and switching between the two antennas, one can actually measure the difference in noise level ...
The other antenna that will certainly help you deal with the high ambient radio frequency broadband noise level at your downtown Mexico City colonia or neighborhood is the time proven tuneable magnetic loop... that is much more challenging to use, because it requires constant retuning due to the very high Q factor or sharpness of resonance... And when located at the rooftop, it must be operated by means of a high precision remote control system. By the way professional magnetic loop antennas are very, yes, very expensive while well built home made ones can provide excellent performance at much lower cost...
Now our next radio hobby related topic... coming from the weekend edition of Dxers Unlimited information about the Brazilian Time Standard Station that operates on 10 megaHertz
The transmitter is running one kilowatt into a one half wave dipole antenna , and it has the callsign or call letter PPE. It uses standard A3H modulation
The transmission content consists of sending the Brazilian Legal Time that is UTC minus three, using a female voice that says Observatorio Nacional fallowed by the current time in hours minuts and seconds.. and sending a short beep tone of one thousand Herz every second and later on three two hundred milliseconds long beeps at the 58, 59 and 60 seconds of each minute making the station easy to distinguish from other time stations. My understanding is that the station does not claim to be a frequency standard transmission although it should be for all practical purposes close enough to ten megaHertz.  Now a short form solar activity report... The Sun continues in a very quiet state, with the sunspot number at 12 on Wedenesday November 9 and back toZERO sunspots on Thursday 10 November when I had to finish writing the script for an unusually early recording session that took place late Thursday UTC day .... Hope to
See you all at the middle of the week program , Tuesday and Wednesday UTC days....and do not forget to send me your radio hobby related questions because on many ocassions the answers have proven to be quite useful to many other listeners around the world... Send mail to inforhc at enet dot cu, again inforhc at enet dot cu , and of course that your signal reports and comments will also be most appreciated amigos.
(Arnie Coro)

Unprecedented international audience growth to 278 million


WASHINGTON, D.C. - The Broadcasting Board of Governors today released its annual impact numbers which show the agency had its largest ever increase in its weekly worldwide audience to 278 million people, up from 226 million in 2015. These increases occurred across all platforms with digital platforms seeing the largest percentage growth, followed by radio and television.

"The unprecedented growth we've seen this year further illustrates the need for U.S. international media particularly in parts of the world where access to balanced, impartial news is severely limited or non-existent," said BBG CEO and Director John Lansing. "In media markets increasingly dominated by disinformation and propaganda, more and more people are turning to BBG networks for fair, accurate, fact-based reporting."

The increases include gains in highly competitive media markets that are of strategic importance to the United States. Digital audiences increased from 32 million to 45 million while those for radio rose by 27% to 130 million. Television audience also grew, increasing 23% to 174 million.

In addition to weekly audience size, the BBG measures its impact using quantitative, qualitative, digital and anecdotal data on a wide range of factors including program quality and credibility, engagement with the news process, and audience understanding of current events. Key accomplishments include:
MBN's Raise Your Voice-Iraq developed new television programs encouraging Iraqis to share their thoughts and opinions on extremism and the underlying causes of terrorism. This programming provides firsthand accounts of the realities of life under ISIL, including the pain and suffering of families and communities.

RFE/RL and VOA actively engaged online in providing alternatives to Russian disinformation. In FY 2016, RFE/RL's DIGIM, the social media arm of Current Time, received 120,000 average weekly engagement actions on Facebook and VOA Russian averaged 45,000 per week.

VOA and RFA increased their social media outreach in Southeast Asia with huge gains in video viewing and engagement on Facebook and YouTube. VOA Vietnamese averaged 2.7 million video views weekly on YouTube, and RFA averaged over 600,000.

OCB hosted a two-day conference on internet freedom in Cuba. The event convened a broad spectrum of digital innovators and independent journalists from Cuba and elsewhere to exchange ideas and provide important information about the state of the internet in Cuba.
(VOA/photo via VOA)

QSL of the Week: A small mediumwave QSL card


Back during the 1930s, many radio listeners in the United States would stay up at night to listen to special programs from distant mediumwave stations throughout the continent.  These dedicated listeners were dubbed Night Owls, and some stations broadcast special programs for these Night Owls and the radio stations had a specific card printed for use as an acknowledgment card for distant night time reception reports.  Though not specifically a QSL card, yet the Night Owl card was accepted as such.

            Back in March 1930, Hadley Wilcox, who lived in Los Angeles, heard a Night Owl program from station KGIR in Butte Montana, with 500 watts on 1360 kHz.  His Night Owl Acknowledgment Card is almost the smallest QSL card in the world, measuring just 3½ inches by 2¼ inches.
(AWR-Wavescan/NWS 403/A Peterson)

New Zealand International closes its old analog shortwave transmitter


At the end of June, Radio New Zealand International closed its quarter century old analog transmitter located at Rangitaiki in the center of the North Island of New Zealand.  But first, we go back in time.
 It was time for change.  The shortwave transmitters in the radio broadcasting station at Titahi Bay, out from Wellington in the North Island of New Zealand, were vey old and quite low powered.  Over the years several different locations had been suggested as a possibility for erecting a new shortwave station that could speak to the Pacific Islands with a louder voice.
 In fact, one specific location that had been given serious consideration by the New Zealand cabinet was at Waiouru towards the center of the North Island.  The large transmitter complex at Waiouru was operated by the New Zealand navy and it was suggested that this would be a suitable location for an additional transmitter installation for the new shortwave voice for New Zealand.   The projected plan for this new location in 1981 called for four transmitters at 50 kW each.  
 However, nine more years went by before the new station became an electronic reality.  The location was changed from Waiouru to Rangitaiki, a change in distance of some 50 miles; and the transmitter complement was changed from four at 50 kW to just one at 100 kW.  A long range plan called for an additional 100 kW transmitter and a total of four curtain antennas.
 The dominion government approved the new shortwave station for Rangitaiki with two immediate purposes in mind: Growing political instability in some of the small Pacific Island nations, and the need for adequate media coverage during the forthcoming Commonwealth Games.  The new shortwave station was readied, and test transmissions went on the air at the end of the year 1989, and into January of the new year 1990. 
 According to the well known New Zealander, Arthur Cushen, the new 100 kW Thomson transmitter Model 2315 from France was officially taken over at Rangitaiki by the New Zealand authorities on December 6 (1989).  At that stage, there were just two antennas, both TCI high band curtains from California, and the original concept indicated that the transmitter output could be split and fed into both antennas simultaneously as needed, thus giving a wider area of coverage.
 The studios for Radio New Zealand International are located in Radio House in Wellington.  The unmanned distant transmitter at Rangitaiki is remotely operated from Wellington; and there is a digital program feed from studio to transmitter, a distance of nearly 200 miles.
 The brand new transmitter station was officially opened at 0400 UTC, Sunday afternoon locally, on January 24, 1990, at the commencement ceremony for the Commonwealth Games, by His Excellency Governor General Sir Paul Reeves.  The inaugural broadcast was beamed to the Pacific on 17680 kHz and it was reported widely.  RNZI printed a limited edition QSL card of just 100 copies for the occasion.  
 The Commonwealth Games are similar to the international Olympic Games, though participants are limited to only the countries that form the British Commonwealth of Nations, the former British Empire.  The 1980 games were staged in Auckland at the top of the North Island, the largest city in New Zealand with a current population of 1.3 million people.
 Programming for RNZI shortwave is taken from the regular Radio New Zealand mediumwave services in the YA and ZB networks, and regular daily programs also are produced by the shortwave staff, which numbers no more then half a dozen people.  In addition, regular daily news bulletins are broadcast in the local Polynesian languages of the South Pacific Islands.  
 Just nine months later, beginning on September 12 (1990), the new transmitter began a month long period of non-stop operation in an attempt to stabilize its operation.  During that time period, this new transmitter had malfunctioned a total of 89 times since it was taken into service.
 A couple of years later, two low band antenna systems were installed; seven years later again, the transmitter was stuck on 17675 kHz due to a switching malfunction.  There were times when the transmitter was run at 50 kW as an economy measure; and on several occasions the station has operated overnight as well during cyclone emergencies in the South Pacific.  One astute international radio monitor noted that RNZI ended its daily transmission on 9885 kHz at 1310 UTC, and then it switched to 6095 kHz for a brief transmission lasting no more than 5 minutes, as a preparation for the opening broadcast next day.
 On a couple of occasions in November 2001, RNZI conducted a brief series of test broadcasts during the day on frequencies in the  6 & 7 & 9 MHz bands, in order to ascertain whether nationwide coverage could be obtained from a single location in the event of a nationwide emergency.  The experimental frequencies were 6095 kHz & 7205 kHz & 9700 kHz. 
 A lightning strike on August 30, 2003 put the station off the air for three months, and during this time Radio New Zealand International was noted on relay via Radio Australia in Shepparton Victoria.
 A new second transmitter, a Thomson digital DRM ready unit Model TSW2100D, was installed in 2006, and this enabled RNZI to broadcast simultaneously via the two transmitters in both the analog and digital modes.  Several local FM stations located on South Pacific Islands were thus granted the opportunity to relay locally the programming in good quality from New Zealand.  
  This 10 year old analog-digital DRM transmitter is currently the only unit on air at Rangitaiki and it is switched from one mode to another, digital and analog, as is required out in the distant islands.  The original quarter century old analog transmitter was finally switched off for the last time, on June 30 earlier this year.
 However, this may not be the end of the story.  The WRTVHB for each year running from 2013 up to the present time states that a future plan for RNZI is the installation of a 300 kW analog-digital DRM capable shortwave transmitter.  Let the future tell its own story.
(AWR-Wavescan/NWS403/A Peterson)