Thursday, May 19, 2016

New Summer 2016 International Shortwave Broadcast Guide Now Available


 
Teak Publishing is pleased to announce the release of the Summer 2016 International Shortwave Broadcast Guide (ISWBG) electronic book by Amazon bestselling author Gayle Van Horn, W4GVH. This all important semi-annual information resource is your electronic guide to the world of shortwave radio listening.
 
Shortwave radio listeners are routinely entertained with unique perspectives to events, music, culture, history, and news from other countries that you won’t see or hear on your local or national broadcast channels. Shortwave radio broadcast aren’t restricted by country borders or oceans, and can propagate thousands of miles, reaching millions of listeners worldwide, in over 300 different languages and dialects. These worldwide transmissions are monitored on internationally assigned radio frequencies between 1700 kHz and 30 MHz.
 
There are even broadcasts from the dark side, transmitted from broadcasters known as clandestine or clanny stations. Clandestine broadcasters are wrapped in mystery and intrigue, and they usually exist to bring about some sort of political change to the country they are targeting. Programming may largely be half-truths or sometimes even outright lies, but it is essentially propaganda for their cause.
 
Listeners who live in the United States can easily hear shortwave broadcast stations from Australia, Canada, China, Cuba, Egypt, France, Germany, India, Iran, Japan, New Zealand, North/South Korea, Saudi Arabia, Taiwan, Turkey, United Kingdom, United States, Vietnam, and many other counties if you have an inexpensive shortwave radio receiver, and you know when and where to listen!
 
If you want to get in on the action, then this Amazon electronic book is your ticket the travel the world via radio. The ISWBG is a 24-hour station/frequency guide to “all” of the known longwave and shortwave radio stations currently broadcasting at time of publication. This unique radio hobby resource is the “only” radio hobby publication that has by-hour station schedules that include all language services, frequencies and world target areas.
 
New In this sixth edition of the ISWBG is a lead story on clandestine broadcast and broadcasters with the latest schedules and frequencies you need to hear these intriguing transmissions. There is also an expanded special feature on Who’s Who in the shortwave radio spectrum. This story covers services and frequencies outside the regular broadcast and amateur radio bands, and includes our new, exclusive Hot HF 1000+ non-broadcast frequency list.
 
Also new in this edition is increased frequency and station coverage of longwave broadcasters, selected medium wave broadcast frequencies used by international broadcasters, and all known international standard time and frequency stations transmitting worldwide.
 
The International Shortwave Broadcast Guide (Summer 2016 edition) is now available for purchase worldwide from Amazon.com at http://www.amazon.com/dp/B01FV3FL72/. The price for this latest edition is US$6.49. Since this book is being released internationally, Amazon customers in the United Kingdom, Germany, France Spain, Italy, Japan, India, Canada, Brazil, Mexico and Australia can order this electronic book (e-Book) from Amazon websites directly servicing these countries. All other countries can use the regular Amazon.com website.
 
This new e-publication edition is a much expanded version of the English shortwave broadcast guide that was formerly published in the pages of the former Monitoring Times magazine for well over 20 years. This one of a kind e-book is published twice a year to correspond with shortwave station’s seasonal time and frequency changes.
 
Don’t own a Kindle from Amazon? Not a problem. You do not need to own a Kindle to read Amazon e-book publications. You can read any Kindle book with Amazon’s free reading apps on literally any electronic media platform.
 
The Kindle app is available for most major smartphones, tablets and computers. There is a Kindle app available for the iPad, iPhone, and iPod touch; Android Phone; Android Tablet; PC; Windows 8; Mac Kindle Cloud Reader; Windows Phone; Samsung; BlackBerry 10; BlackBerry; amd WebOS. This means with a free Kindle reading apps, you can buy a Kindle book once, and read it on any device with the Kindle app installed*. You can also read that same Kindle book on a Kindle device if you own one.
 
You can find additional details on these apps by checking out this link to the Amazon website at www.amazon.com/gp/feature.html?ie=UTF8&docId=1000493771.
 
For additional information on this and other Teak Publishing radio hobby books, monitor the company sponsored Internet blogs – The Military Monitoring Post (http://mt-milcom.blogspot.com/), The Btown Monitor Post (http://monitor-post.blogspot.com/) and The Shortwave Central (http://mt-shortwave.blogspot.com/) for availability of additional e-books that are currently in production. You can learn more about the author by going to her author page on Amazon at http://www.amazon.com/Gayle-Van-Horn/e/B0084MVQCM/.
 
The International Shortwave Broadcast Guide will have wide appeal to shortwave radio hobbyists, amateur radio operators, educators, foreign language students, news agencies, news buffs, or anyone interested in listening to a global view of news and major events as they happen.
 

Whether you are an amateur radio operator or shortwave radio enthusiasts, and want to get in on the action outside of the ham bands, then this new electronic book from Teak Publishing is a must in your radio reference library.
 

Who will be the first to buy the new editions? We are also very interested in your reviews posted to Amazon of our new edition. Who will be the first to review the Summer Edition? Those who review the book will be listed here on the blog/ Here are a few of the public comments from radio hobbyists who purchased previous editions of this Amazon e-book.
 
Excellent Shortwave Introduction and Program Guide by Don K3PRN

Excellent, very reasonable guide to shortwave radio. As a long time shortwave listener, the listing of all shortwave stations by UTC time is very useful to me. I had previously a shortwave website that listed only English broadcasts rather than an all station listing with the language that will be broadcast. I would highly recommend this e book for all new shortwave listeners and those that interested in a very portable listing of all stations by UTC. I only hope that this will be updated twice a year for many more years.
Good Product by Radio Freq 

Since Monitoring Times stopped publishing shortwave radio schedules, there has been a dearth of resources for radio-heads. This guide nicely fulfills gap. It is very comprehensive.
It is nice someone is dedicated to SWL by Robert K. Mallory 
Very concise and well organized. Not much to choose from these days, it is nice someone is dedicated to Shortwave Radio Listening.
 
 
Shortwave Broadcast Guide by Kindle Customer
Since Monitoring Times is no longer in publication, this guide is required for the dedicated shortwave listener. There is information provided that I have found nowhere else. It will be a welcome addition to any listener's equipment. Gayle Van Horn has been publishing this research for many years and the followers are numerous, from beginners to professionals. The author's work is accurate, concise and thorough. If you have a shortwave radio, you need this publication as much as a set of earphones. There is none better.
 
 
Very Good Source for Shortwave Stations Broadcast Schedules by Kenneth Windyka
I've got to admit up front that I don't have a strong interest in this part of the hobby. HOWEVER, Gayle Van Horn makes it easy to determine what one can hear on the short wave bands during a particular time period (in GMT time sorted format). I also like the internet reference available, so that one can listen to programs via the internet even if its' not possible via the shortwave radio.
 
 
NJ Shortwave listener hears International Frequencies with new guide help by Stanley E Rozewski, Jr.
This e-book is complete and accurate in presenting a low cost SW frequency guide and important must read topics for the new or experienced user. I liked the easy reading format, and understandable frequency guide. I will order the second edition next year.
 
 
This is my go-to-first reference by Mary C Larson 
When I turn on the shortwave receiver and want to find out what's on and where to look, Van Horn's handy frequency guide is a smart place to begin. The format is not unlike the one Monitoring Times (R.I.P.) used each month. Presumably, updated ISBGs will be published twice per year, but you can check for the updates on her blog, (mt-shortwave.blogspot.com).
 
 
Good value by DrP 
This is an excellent well-written book that is very affordable when compared to encyclopedic guides, e.g., the WRTH. Much the same information is included. The first part is a nice introduction to SW listening pitched to the beginner. Included is an informative section on purchasing a radio spanning low-end <$100 models up through the most advanced transceivers. The bulk of the book contains a list of world-wide SW broadcasters, organized by frequency band. This makes it ideal for browsing one band at a time, but much less so if you want to search for broadcasts from a particular country.
 
 
Shortwave Is Not Quite Dead by James Tedford (Bothell, WA United States)
It was barely breathing as of late, but there is still a lot you can hear on shortwave radio. You need more than a little dedication, and a better-than-adequate radio to hear what remains on the HF bands, but if you have those, you will be rewarded with a lot of interesting audio programming. This book is a good guide to what is currently available over the international airwaves.
-30-

 

Monday, May 16, 2016

Isle of Music program schedule for May 17


Our May 17 (May 16 in the Americas) program will feature a brief interview with Angel Toirac, pianist of Influencia, and a lot of music by this distinctive Jazz ensemble, We wiill also have some vintage 1970s Cuban Funk from Grupo Monumental, some recent Cuban R & B by Eme, and we'll finish the wonderful concert piano album Danzas Para Piano de Ignacio Cervantes.

Two listening options on shortwave:
WBCQ, 7490 KHz, Tuesdays 0000 UTC (8pm EDT Mondays)
Channel 292, 6070 KHz, Tuesdays 1900 UTC (2100 CEST)
See the NOTES section of our Facebook page for more information

We now offer eQSLs (only) for reception reports  for From the Isle of Music sent for both transmissions  to tilfordproductions@gmail.com.  For a hardcopy QSL from WBCQ, listeners still need to contact them directly.

William "Bill" Tilford, Owner/Producer
Tilford Productions, LLC

Weekly Propagation Forecast Bulletin



Product: Weekly Highlights and Forecasts
:Issued: 2016 May 16 0334 UTC
# Prepared by the US Dept. of Commerce, NOAA, Space Weather Prediction Center
# Product description and SWPC web contact http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/weekly.html
#
#                Weekly Highlights and Forecasts
#
Highlights of Solar and Geomagnetic Activity 09 - 15 May 2016

Solar activity was low and only C-class flare activity was observed. Region 2543 (S05, L=002, class/area=Dao/90 on 10 May) produced a C7 flare at 14/1134 UTC which was the largest event of the period. Region 2544 (N21,L=296, class/area=Dao/150 on 15 May) produced five low-level C-class flares on 15 May, the largest being a C1 at 15/0502 UTC. Region 2542 (N12, L=357, class/area=Dai/150 on 09 May) produced a long-duration C3 flare at 15/1603 UTC with an associated
filament eruption and partial-halo coronal mass ejection (CME) that  departed off of the west limb. Forecaster analysis and WSA/Enlil modelling determined that the CME did not have an Earth-directed component. There were no Earth-directed CMEs during the period.

No proton events were observed at geosynchronous orbit. However, a slight enhancement was observed on 15 May associated with a long-duration C3 flare and filament eruption near Region 2542. A peak flux of 2 pfu was observed on 15 May at 2315 UTC.

The greater than 2 MeV electron flux at geosynchronous orbit was at very high levels from 09-13 May due to the influences of a negative polarity coronal hole high speed stream (CH HSS). High levels were observed on 14 May and moderate levels rounded out the week on 15
May.

Geomagnetic field activity was at unsettled to G3 (Strong) geomagnetic storm levels on 09 May due to the residual effects of a co-rotating interaction region and subsequent negative polarity coronal hole high speed stream (CH HSS). Mainly quiet to unsettled conditions were observed for 10-14 May with a nominal solar wind. A positive polarity CH HSS became connected with Earths magnetic field
on 15 May causing quiet to active conditions.

Forecast of Solar and Geomagnetic Activity 16 May - 11 June 2016

Solar activity is expected to be at very low (B-class flares) to low (C-class flares) levels throughout the outlook period.

No proton events are expected at geosynchronous orbit.

The greater than 2 MeV electron flux at geosynchronous orbit is expected to be at high levels on 16-23 May, 30 May-02 Jun, and 06-10 Jun. Moderate flux levels are expected for the remainder of the
period.

Geomagnetic field activity is expected to reach G1 (Minor) geomagnetic storm levels on 16, 19-20 May due to the influence of recurrent positive polarity coronal hole high speed streams (CH
HSS). G1 (Minor) storm levels are also expected on 29 May and 04-05 June due to the influnce of negative polarity CH HSSs.

Product: 27-day Space Weather Outlook Table 27DO.txt
:Issued: 2016 May 16 0334 UTC
# Prepared by the US Dept. of Commerce, NOAA, Space Weather Prediction Center
# Product description and SWPC web contact http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/wwire.html
#
#      27-day Space Weather Outlook Table
#                Issued 2016-05-16
#
#   UTC      Radio Flux   Planetary   Largest
#  Date       10.7 cm      A Index    Kp Index
2016 May 16     105          23          5
2016 May 17     100          12          3
2016 May 18     100           8          3
2016 May 19     100          18          4
2016 May 20     100          26          5
2016 May 21      95          12          3
2016 May 22      95           8          3
2016 May 23      95           5          2
2016 May 24      95          10          3
2016 May 25      95           5          2
2016 May 26      90           5          2
2016 May 27      90           5          2
2016 May 28      90          15          3
2016 May 29      95          25          5
2016 May 30     100          10          3
2016 May 31     100           5          2
2016 Jun 01     100           5          2
2016 Jun 02      95          12          4
2016 Jun 03      95          12          4
2016 Jun 04      95          35          6
2016 Jun 05      95          30          5
2016 Jun 06      95          15          4
2016 Jun 07      95           5          2
2016 Jun 08     100           5          2
2016 Jun 09     100           5          2
2016 Jun 10      95           8          3
2016 Jun 11     100          15          3
(NOAA)

Friday, May 13, 2016

VOA Radiogram schedule


Hello friends,

You might remember that last year, the BBG, parent agency of VOA, issued a Request for Proposals for the development of a decoder app for VOA Radiogram. There were no proposals, but that might be because of the short deadline. It's possible that the RFQ will be issued again, but only if there is potential interest by developers. So let me know if you are an interested developer.

The specifications in the RFQ would be the same as in the 2015 RFQ, which you can see here ...

http://www.bbg.gov/wp-content/media/2015/09/RFQ-BBG50-Q-15-0915MD-Software-Development.pdf

VOA Radiogram this weekend will be all MFSK32, except for the transmission schedule in Olivia 64-2000 under the closing music. The show will include six MFSK images.

Here is the lineup for VOA Radiogram, program 163, 14-15 May 2016, all in MFSK32 except where noted:

 1:34  Program preview
 2:46  Giant Magellan Telescope in Chile*
 8:42  UK government review of the BBC*
14:29  RFE/RL Crimea website blocked*
18:35  Radio/TV Martí now receiving letters direct from Cuba*
23:11  Image from South Pole Journal*
26:36  Closing announcements*
28:15  Olivia 64-2000: Transmission schedule under music

*  with image

Please send reception reports to radiogram@voanews.com.

VOA Radiogram transmission schedule
(all days and times UTC):
Sat 0930-1000 5745 kHz
Sat 1600-1630 17580 kHz
Sun 0230-0300 5745 kHz
Sun 1930-2000 15670 kHz
All via the Edward R. Murrow transmitting station in North Carolina.

The Mighty KBC has a different transmission schedule this weekend: To North America Sunday at 0000-0200 UTC on 9925 kHz, via Germany, with a minute of MFSK32 at about 0130 UTC. And to Europe Sunday at 0800-1000 UTC on 6095 kHz, also via Germany, with the minute of MFSK32 at about 0830 UTC. Reports for KBC reception and decoding to Eric: themightykbc@gmail.com .

DigiDX will transmit DX news in MFSK32 and perhaps other modes on its usual schedule:
Sunday 2130-2200 UTC - 15770kHz via WRMI Florida
Sunday 2330-2400 UTC - 11580kHz via WRMI Florida
Monday 2000-2030 UTC - 6070kHz via Channel 292 Germany
Consult https://www.facebook.com/digidx/ for any additions or changes to this schedule.

Thank you for your reception reports from last weekend. Reception was especially difficult on Sunday due to a solar event. I am now compiling the gallery of MFSK images from program 137, and will try to send that out this weekend.

Early next week I will send information about programs 164 and 165, to be broadcast during the last two weekends of May.

I hope you can tune in and write in this weekend.

Kim

Kim Andrew Elliott
Producer and Presenter
VOA Radiogram
voaradiogram.net
Twitter: @VOARadiogram

Weekend relay schedules

KBC & HLR Relays

Saturday HLR:
06.00 to 12.00 UTC, on 6190 KHz
12.00 to 15.00 UTC, on 7265 KHz

The Mighty KBC this Sunday!

The Giant Jukebox with Eric van Willegen on Sunday May 15th  :

00:00 - 03:00 UTC on 9925 KHz to the USA
09:00 - 11:00 UTC on 6095 KHz to Western Europe

Sunday HLR:
09.00 to 12.00 UTC on 9485 kHz

E-mail: *redaktion@hamburger-lokalradio.de
 *Thank you!

HLR FM-DAB+ Program via the Internet :    www.hamburger-lokalradio.net  Daily
24 h

Good Listening!
73s,
Tom Taylor

--
European Music Radio:
website: www.europeanmusicradio.com
email:    emrshortwave@gmail.com
_

Armed Forces Day Communication Test

"Armed Forces Day 2016 Communication Test to Include Direct Military-Ham Contact on 60 Meters, May 14

This year’s Armed Forces Day Crossband Communication Test on Saturday, May 14, will include a significant new wrinkle: Select military stations will be using 60 meter interoperability channels to communicate directly with Amateur Radio stations on the band. Back this year, select military stations will use crossband Automatic Link Establishment (2G ALE) communication as well as MIL-STD Serial PSK to send the Secretary of Defense Armed Forces Day message. Armed Forces Day 2016 is Saturday, May 21, but the radio event is held earlier to avoid conflicting with Dayton Hamvention, May 20-22.

The annual Armed Forces Day Communication Test is an opportunity to exercise two-way communication capability between Amateur Radio and military stations using a variety of modes, including SSB and CW as well as digital modes. The annual event gives participants — including shortwave listeners (SWLs) — an opportunity to demonstrate their technical skills, and to receive recognition from the appropriate military radio station.

QSL cards will be provided to all stations that make contact with the military stations. The Army, Air Force, Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard cosponsor the joint military/Amateur Radio, with military stations transmitting on military frequencies and listening on Amateur Radio bands.

Amateur Radio stations and Short Wave Listeners interested in trying the MIL-STD Serial PSK mode can download the software program, MS-DMT.

Full details about this year’s Armed Forces Day radio activities — including stations, frequencies, times, and modes of operation — will be posted by April 12 as well as on the US Army MARS Facebook page."

Schedule:
http://www.usarmymars.org/home/announcements

Tuesday, May 10, 2016

The Radio Scene on the Largest Tropical Island in the Caribbean



The Cuba Story - Part 1

Quite recently, Pope Francis from the Vatican made an official visit to the island of Cuba in the Caribbean.  Let us catch up on some of these interesting events, and we take a look at the early wireless and radio scene in Cuba.
            According to the encyclopedia, Cuba is 120 miles across, 777 miles long, and it covers an area of 111,111 square kilometers.  In addition to the main island, there are more than 4,000 smaller islands and cays, including Juventud, or the Isle of Pines, with its 100,000 people.  The total population for Cuba these days is 12 million.
            If you fly over the island, you will admire its lush tropical scenery, with its tree covered towering mountains, and rolling hills and broad grasslands and deep bays with sandy beaches and colorful coral reefs.  Even to this day, it is a chosen destination for multitudes of tourists coming in from Canada, Europe and other countries in the Americas.
            In the pre-colonial era, Cuba was home to several Amerindian tribes who had migrated in from North America, Central America and South America.  On October 28, 1492 the famous Atlantic explorer Christopher Columbus landed on the northeastern shore of Cuba, claiming the island for Spain, and naming it Isla Juana.  The subsequent name for the island, Cuba, comes from the local Taino language, and it conveys the meaning of a pleasant land.
            Eight years later, Sebastian de Ocampo circumnavigated Cuba, thus confirming that it is indeed an island.  Then three years later again, the first Spanish settlement was founded on the very eastern tip of the island.  Give four more years (1515), and the settlement of San Cristobal de la Habana was founded.  At one stage, Havana was the third largest city in the Americas, and as we know, it has since become their national capital.
            Over the centuries, Cuba has been invaded by armed forces from France, Holland, England, and the United States; and on five separate occasions, the United States has attempted to buy Cuba from Spain.  For a decade or so around a century ago, the United States governed the island as an American territory, but in 1920, the island was granted independence.
            The first wireless stations in Cuba were installed more than 100 years ago; and the first two stations were installed at Mariel, 25 miles west of Havana and on the Isle of Pines-Juventud.  In 1924, a total of 9 wireless stations were on the air in communication service in Cuba, and each was identified with a callsign in the consecutive series, PWA, PWB, PWC, etc.
            The beginnings of radio broadcasting in Cuba can be traced back to the year 1912 when the American electrician Frank Jones migrated to the island to serve in the cane sugar industry at Tuinucu in the center of the island.  Soon afterwards, he constructed his own amateur wireless station, a 2 kW spark facility.
            In December 1921, Frank Jones ordered an assortment of radio equipment from the United States, and when it all finally arrived at his country location, he assembled it into a radio broadcasting station.  This new amateur radio broadcasting station was planned for operation on a wavelength of approximately 300 meters (1000 kHz).  The aerial was a 200 ft long inverted L, the earthing system was a full sized above ground counterpoise, and the electric power came from the generating plant that he himself was supervising at the cane sugar farm.
            When callsigns in Cuba were first issued, the Frank Jones station at Tuinucu was allocated initially the call 5KW, though only a week later this was amended to 6KW.  He also operated his radio station in the amateur mode under the callsign 6XJ.
            The radio programs over amateur broadcasting station 6KW were heard widely in the Americas, as well as in Europe and occasionally across the Pacific.  His QSL cards in response to the huge inflow of reception reports, a generic card giving technical details of the station, were issued by the hundreds, and they are sometimes available for purchase on Ebay to this day.  
            In 1930, the callsign for the Tuinucu station was listed as CM6KW.  Then later in the same year, the amateur broadcasting station gave way to a fully licensed station in Tuinucu, CMHC with 500 watts on 790 kHz.
            Another significant early broadcasting station in Cuba was inaugurated in 1920 by Luis Casas Romero as an amateur station in Havana under the callsign 2LC.  Two years later on August 22 (1922), this station began an irregular schedule of program broadcasting on 810 kHz with equipment provided by the American electronic conglomerate IT&T.  This station signed on for its evening broadcasts at 9:00 pm with the ticking of a clock, the firing of the canon La Cabana, followed by a bulletin of weather information.
            During the following year, the callsign was amended to Q2LC due to a change in international radio regulations.  Interestingly, we might say that the initial Q identified the island Quba!
            Around this era, an official radio broadcasting station was installed in the capital city, Havana.  This new facility was established by the Cuban Telephone Company which was owned by another American electronic conglomerate, AT&T.
            At the time, AT&T procured three 500 watt mediumwave transmitters from Western Electric; one for installation as WEAF in New York City, another for installation in Puerto Rico, and a third for installation in Havana.  The Havana station was installed in the Cuban Telephone Company building at Zulueta and Dragones Streets under the callsign PWX, where the two towers stood as highly visible electronic icons for many years.
            This station was inaugurated in a special broadcast beginning at 4:00 pm on Tuesday October 10, 1922.  The Cuban President, Alfredo de Mayas y Alfonso, presented an inaugural speech in English, and Luis Casas Romero conducted a special orchestra in the presidential palace with classical and Cuban music.  The programming for this first special broadcast in Cuba was sent to station WEAF in New York by cable and phone lines for broadcast city wide on local mediumwave. 
            In actual fact, this inaugural broadcast in Havana on 750 kHz was produced more for the benefit of the American audience rather than the Cuban audience.  At the time, there were no more than a hundred radio receivers in Havana.
            Interestingly, the programming from the Luis Casas Romero station 2LC was at times taken on relay for broadcast over the new PWX.  During the following year (1923), a total of 30 mediumwave stations were on the air in Cuba,

            On January 1, 1930, station PWX was given a new regularized callsign along with all other mediumwave broadcasting station on the island due to new international radio regulations, and PWX became CMQ. 
(AWR-Wavescan/NWS376) 

Monday, May 09, 2016

Yakutia restarts on shortwave



Russia

Shortwave broadcasts from Radio Sakha, Sakha (Yakutia) Republic have resumed after ceasing back in 2010 [March 2011].

Frequency 7345 kHz audible at 0900 UT today, 7 May, with sign on of their evening broadcast including weather, (via remote rx Global Tuners, Japan), parallel frequency is weaker 7295 kHz. (maybe audible at night here in UK, though both frequencies widely used by others, e.g CNR)

Report on resumption of shortwave broadcasts, including TV news reports
online (in Russian) here: http://nvk-online.ru/news/6819

Says shortwave covers 2.5 million square kilometres, 78% of the area of Yakutia. Shortwave broadcasts had been suspended in 2010, and so the signal was only audible on FM in towns. Now with launch of shortwave Radio Yakut, fisherman, hunters and people leading a nomadic lifestyle outside the settlements can listen.Thanks to tip from Vasily Gulyaev on WRTH F_B group, 6 May.

The Sakha Republic covers such a huge area, it spans three time zones. It is also renowned for recording some of the lowest temperatures ever.
https:\\en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sakha_Republic
(Alan Pennington-UK, BrDXC-UK ng May 7)
(Top Nx 1251/07 May 2016)

7295 NVK R.Sakha 2100-2400 12345.. Yakut/Russian
7295 NVK R.Sakha 2200-2400 .....67 Yakut/Russian
7295 NVK R.Sakha 0000-0500 1.....7 Yakut/Russian
7295 NVK R.Sakha 0300-0500 .23456. Yakut/Russian
7295 NVK R.Sakha 0900-1200 1234567 Yakut/Russian

7345 NVK R.Sakha 2100-2400 12345.. Yakut/Russian
7345 NVK R.Sakha 2200-2400 .....67 Yakut/Russian
7345 NVK R.Sakha 0000-0500 1.....7 Yakut/Russian
7345 NVK R.Sakha 0300-0500 .23456. Yakut/Russian
7345 NVK R.Sakha 0900-1200 1234567 Yakut/Russian
(AOKI 09 May 2016)

Weekly Propagation Forecast Bulletins


:Product: Weekly Highlights and Forecasts
:Issued: 2016 May 09 0436 UTC
# Prepared by the US Dept. of Commerce, NOAA, Space Weather Prediction Center
# Product description and SWPC web contact http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/weekly.html
#
#                Weekly Highlights and Forecasts
#
Highlights of Solar and Geomagnetic Activity 02 - 08 May 2016

Solar activity was low and only C-class flare activity was observed. Region 2540 (N21, L=068, class/area=Hrx/20 on 01 May) produced a C3 flare at 02/0842 UTC which was the largest event of the period. Region 2535 (N05, L=124, class/area=Hax/60 on 24 Apr) produced a C1 flare at 04/1531 UTC that had an associated Type II radio sweep (est. shock speed 560 km/s) and coronal mass ejection (CME). This CME was first observed in LASCO/C2 coronagraph imagery beginning 04/1412 UTC and likely arrived at Earth early on 08 May (see geomag section below for additional information). A pair of filament eruptions centered near N22E39 and N31E42 were observed in GONG
imagery beginning at around 07/1515 UTC. The associated CME was first observed in LASCO/C2 imagery at 07/1648 UTC but analysis indicated that this CME was not Earth-directed.

No proton events were observed at geosynchronous orbit.

The greater than 2 MeV electron flux at geosynchronous orbit reached high levels on 03-06 May and moderate levels on 02, 07-08 May.

Geomagnetic field activity was at unsettled to G1 (Minor) geomagnetic storm levels on 02 May with quiet to active levels on 03 May due to the influence of a negative polarity coronal hole high speed stream (CH HSS). Quiet levels were observed on 04 May and quiet to unsettled levels were observed on 05 May under a nominal solar wind regime. The onset of a positive polarity CH HSS caused
quiet to G1 (Minor) storm levels on 06 May and quiet to active levels on 07 May. On 08 May G1-G3 (Minor-Strong) geomagnetic storms were observed and analysis suggested that a CME (likely from 04 May as mentioned in solar activity section) was embedded in a CIR preceding a negative polarity CH HSS.

Forecast of Solar and Geomagnetic Activity 09 May - 04 June 2016

Solar activity is expected to be at very low (B-class flares) to low (C-class flares) levels throughout the outlook period.

No proton events are expected at geosynchronous orbit.

The greater than 2 MeV electron flux at geosynchronous orbit is expected to reach very high levels on 10-13 May and high levels on 09, 14, and 30 May-02 Jun. Moderate flux levels are expected for the remainder of the period.

Geomagnetic field activity is expected to be reach G3 (Strong) geomagnetic storm levels on 09 May and G1 (Minor) storm levels on 10 May due to the influence of a negative polarity coronal hole high speed stream (CH HSS). G1 (Minor) storm levels are likely on 20 May due to the influence of a positive polarity CH HSS as well as on 29 May and 04 Jun due to the influence of negative polarity CH HSSs.

Product: 27-day Space Weather Outlook Table 27DO.txt
:Issued: 2016 May 09 0436 UTC
# Prepared by the US Dept. of Commerce, NOAA, Space Weather Prediction Center
# Product description and SWPC web contact http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/wwire.html
#
#      27-day Space Weather Outlook Table
#                Issued 2016-05-09
#
#   UTC      Radio Flux   Planetary   Largest
#  Date       10.7 cm      A Index    Kp Index
2016 May 09      85          43          6
2016 May 10      85          25          5
2016 May 11      90          15          4
2016 May 12      90           8          3
2016 May 13      90           5          2
2016 May 14      95           5          2
2016 May 15      95          12          4
2016 May 16      90           8          3
2016 May 17      85           5          2
2016 May 18      82           5          2
2016 May 19      82          12          4
2016 May 20      82          15          5
2016 May 21      82          12          4
2016 May 22      82           5          2
2016 May 23      85           5          2
2016 May 24      85          10          3
2016 May 25      85           5          2
2016 May 26      90           5          2
2016 May 27      90           5          2
2016 May 28      90          10          3
2016 May 29      90          25          5
2016 May 30      90          10          4
2016 May 31      88           5          2
2016 Jun 01      88           5          2
2016 Jun 02      88          12          4
2016 Jun 03      85          12          4
2016 Jun 04      85          30          5
(NOAA)

Friday, May 06, 2016

VOA Radiogram weekend schedule


Hello friends,

Lately we have been trying to determine why some listeners have less success with Olivia 64-2000 than with MFSK32, even though, in theory, Olivia 64-2000 should be more robust. I suggested that the problem might be related to the bandwidth of the receiver, given that Olivia 64-2000 is 2000 Hz wide.

Christopher, K6FIB, a key adviser to VOA Radiogram, thinks the performance of Olivia is related to the processing power of the PC or the mobile device. Paul in Europe provided evidence of this in his TIVAR Android shoot-out. Other listeners wonder if it could be other components, such as the microphones on Android devices, which would be important if acoustic coupling from the radio to the device is used.

VOA Radiogram this weekend will include an eight-minute story in Olivia 64-2000. This will allow further experimentation. If we enjoy poor reception conditions, the experiments will be even more interesting.

Here is the lineup for VOA Radiogram, program 162, 7-8 May 2016, all in MFSK32 except where noted:


 1:34  Program preview
 2:41  Rubbish-burning experiment in Norway*
 7:55  Olivia 64-2000: UAE may make mountain to change climate*
18:34  MFSK32: FCC considers change to amateur data regulations*
23:37  Closing announcements*

* with image

Please send reception reports to radiogram@voanews.com.



VOA Radiogram transmission schedule
(all days and times UTC):
Sat 0930-1000 5745 kHz
Sat 1600-1630 17580 kHz
Sun 0230-0300 5745 kHz
Sun 1930-2000 15670 kHz
All via the Edward R. Murrow transmitting station in North Carolina.

The Mighty KBC will transmit a minute of MFSK32 Sunday at about 0220 UTC (Saturday 10:20 pm EDT) on 9925 kHz, via Germany. This is part of the KBC broadcast to North America at 0000-0300 UTC on 9925 kHz. Please send reception reports to Eric: themightykbc@gmail.com .


DigiDX will transmit DX news in MFSK32 and perhaps other modes on its usual schedule:
Sunday 2130 UTC - 15770kHz via WRMI Florida
Sunday 2330 UTC - 11580kHz via WRMI Florida
Monday 2000 UTC - 6070kHz via Channel 292 Germany
Consult https://www.facebook.com/digidx/ for any additions or changes to this schedule.



Thank you for your reports to VOA Radiogram last weekend.  Now that the gallery for program 159 has finally been sent, I will compile a gallery for program 137 (November 15-16, 2015) and maybe send it out this weekend.

I hope you can tune in and write in this weekend.

Kim

Kim Andrew Elliott
Producer and Presenter
VOA Radiogram
voaradiogram.net
Twitter: @VOARadiogram (especially active before, during, and after broadcasts)








Tuesday, May 03, 2016

May specials from DX Stamps & Supplies


Dear Customer,

Below are specials for May 2016. Hope you find something you can use!

 If you need a current stamp list or supply list, I can mail or email it to you.

NEWS: Still have a supply of $1.15 in 3 stamps: 100 for $90.ppd or 300 for $260.ppd

MORE NEWS:    Global forevers stock almost gone....order soon if you enjoy using these. 

IDEA:  Slightly damaged Deluxe QSL Album only $34.00 -or- buy 2 for only $60.!!

 NEW RATES: Uruguay rate now $60, up from $50


If you hear of or notice any new rates, let me know.

NEW PRICES: 


IN STOCK AGAIN:  Thailand

STAMPS ON BACK ORDER:  Fiji, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Turkey.


U.S. DISCOUNT POSTAGE DEALS!!

Save Big on your domestic mailings when you plaster
your envelope with colorful stamps.
47c Units
Forever
in 2 stamps
in 3 stamps
in 4 stamps
in 5 stamps
x 100
$45.00
$40.00
$39.00
$38.00
$37.00
x 200
$87.00
$78.00
$76.00
$74.00
$72.00
x 400
xx
$152.00
$148.00
$142.00
$137.00

International Rate
$1.15 Units
Global forever
x 20
$22.00
x 100
$100.00
x 200
$200.00
x 500
xxx
ORDER NOW!

 MAY 2016  DX  STAMP  SPECIALS
2 Germany-$2.60    2 Russia-$2.60    3 Japan-$3.90  
2 UK-$3.00    2 France-$3.60    2 Spain-$4.00

 U.S. Postage Deals!!
200 x 47c in 2 stamps: regular price $78, this month $73. or
400 x 47c in 2 stamps: regular price $152, this month only $140.ppd!!!

 MAY 2016  DX  SUPPLY  SPECIALS
200/200 European Mailers and Returns -$40.00
400/400 European Air Mailers and Air Returns - $75.00
600/600 European Air Mailers and Air Returns - $100.00
200/200 Stateside Mailers and Returns - $19.00

Priority Mail Shipping Rates: Orders up to $40.00 add $9.00, orders from $41.00 to $100.00 add $15.00. orders from $101.00 to $150.00 add $20.00, orders over $150.00 add 15%. When ordering supplies and stamps, the stamps ride free, just use supply total to figure shipping costs. Shipments to Canada and overseas ship at a greater cost. (07/2015 modified)

Stamps Only Orders: Just add $1.00 P&H for posting to USA, add $2.00 for posting to Canada.

73, bill

William Plum
12 Glenn Road
Flemington, NJ 08822
908 788 1020

Email: plumdx@msn.com