Sunday, July 15, 2018

KiwiSDR TDoA Finding Now Freely Available for Public Use


An interesting article, of special interest on TDoA (Time difference  of Arrival), a direction finding technique.


A few weeks ago we posted about some experimental work going on with Time Difference of Arrival (TDoA) direction finding techniques on KiwiSDR units. The idea is that public KiwiSDRs distributed around the world can be used to pinpoint the physical locations of any 0 - 30 MHz transmitter using the TDoA technique. This feature has recently been activated and can be accessed for free via any KiwiSDR.

The KiwiSDR is a US$299 HF SDR that can monitor the entire 0 - 30 MHz band at once. It is designed to be web-based and shared, meaning that the KiwiSDR owner, or anyone that they've given access, can tune and listen to it via a web browser over the internet. Many public KiwiSDRs can be found and browsed from the list at sdr.hu or by signal strength and location on this website.

Additinal story at: https://www.rtl-sdr.com/kiwisdr-tdoa-direction-finding-now-freely-available-for-public-use/


Summer 2018 International Shortwave Broadcast Guide Now Available at Amazon



Older ham radio operators and radio listeners might remember a time when shortwave radio stations broadcast a nearly constant drumbeat of political propaganda during the Cold War years. Shortwave radio stations such as Radio Moscow, the Voice of America, and the BBC, to name a few, played an important ideological role during that confrontation between the East and the West.

Once again, Global Radio broadcasters have moved to the front lines at what is now shaping up as a new Cold War by some of the world’s major super powers. As tensions heat up in the world’s hotspots such as eastern Europe, the Middle East and Eastern Asia, you can follow breaking international events on the radio waves, but you need an accurate and comprehensive guide to broadcast frequencies to hear it.

Teak Publishing is pleased release that important guide – the 10th edition (Summer 2018) International Shortwave Broadcast Guide (ISWBG) electronic book by Amazon bestselling author Gayle Van Horn W4GVH.

If you want to get in on the action, then this Amazon electronic book is your ticket to travel the Global Radio bands. The ISWBG is an exclusive 24-hour station/frequency guide with schedules for selected medium wave broadcasters and all known longwave/shortwave radio stations transmitting at time of publication. This unique resource is the only radio publication that has by-hour schedules that includes all language services, frequencies and world target areas for over 500 stations. It has a complete listing of DX radio programs and Internet websites addresses for many of the stations listed in the book. There are also listings for standard time and frequency stations, and even a few intriguing spy numbers station listings.

New in this 10th edition of the ISWBG is a feature, Monitoring Brazil on Shortwave Radio. It is more than futebol! by Gayle Van Horn. Soccer teams from around the world will compete this summer in the FIFA World Cup, and Brazil is expected to be a top contender to win the event. This article will aid you in monitoring broadcasters that will be carrying Brazilian soccer team news during this international event.

Other authors with articles in this edition include The Spectrum Monitor’s Fred Waterer, with a feature on summer radio programming, and Hans Johnson with a profile on the state of DRM broadcasting in 2018. There are also two First Look reviews on the new AirSpy HF+ SDR and the W6LVP Magnetic Loop Antenna by Loyd Van Horn W4LVH.

Spectrum Monitor e-zine columnist/feature writer Larry Van Horn N5FPW has a special feature on Who’s Who in the Shortwave Radio Spectrum that will assist the reader in monitoring Global Radio activity outside the broadcast radio spectrum. This article also includes an update to the Teak Publishing HF 1000+ non-broadcast frequency list.

International Shortwave Broadcast Guide 10th edition of this semiannual Teak Publishing publication is available worldwide from Amazon and their various international websites at https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07CT89MNP.

The price for this latest edition is still US$7.99. Since this book is being released internationally, Amazon customers in the United Kingdom, Germany, France Spain, Italy, Japan, India, Canada, Brazil, Mexico and Australia can order this electronic book (e-Book) from Amazon websites directly servicing these countries. All other countries can use the regular Amazon.com website.
Don’t own a Kindle reader from Amazon? Not a problem. You do not need to own a Kindle to read Amazon e-book publications. You can read any Kindle book with Amazon’s free reading apps on literally any electronic media platform.

A Kindle app is available for most major smartphones, tablets and computers. There is a Kindle app available for the iPad, iPhone, and iPod touch; Android Phone; Android Tablet; PC; Windows 8; Mac Kindle Cloud Reader; Windows Phone; Samsung; BlackBerry 10; BlackBerry; and WebOS. This means with a free Kindle reading apps, you can buy a Kindle book once, and read it on any device with the Kindle app installed*. You can also read that same Kindle book on a Kindle device if you own one.

You can find additional details on these apps by checking out this link to the Amazon website at www.amazon.com/gp/feature.html?ie=UTF8&docId=1000493771.

For additional information on this and other Teak Publishing radio hobby books, monitor the company sponsored Internet blogs – The Military Monitoring Post (http://mt-milcom.blogspot.com/), The Btown Monitor Post (http://monitor-post.blogspot.com/) and The Shortwave Central (http://mt-shortwave.blogspot.com/) for availability of additional e-books that are currently in production. You can learn more about the author by going to her author page on Amazon at http://www.amazon.com/Gayle-Van-Horn/e/B0084MVQCM/.

Global Radio listeners are routinely entertained with unique perspectives to events, music, culture, history, and news from other countries that you won’t see or hear on your local or national broadcast channels. Global Radio broadcasts are not restricted by country borders or oceans, and can travel thousands of miles, reaching millions of listeners worldwide, now in over 300 different languages and dialects.

Listeners can easily hear shortwave broadcast stations from China, Cuba, Egypt, France, Germany, India, Iran, Japan, New Zealand, North/South Korea, Saudi Arabia, Taiwan, Turkey, United Kingdom, United States, Vietnam, and many other counties. If you have a shortwave radio receiver or Internet connection, and this unique radio resource, you will know when and where to listen to your favorite radio broadcast station.

The International Shortwave Broadcast Guide will have wide appeal to amateur radio operators, shortwave radio hobbyists, news agencies, news buffs, educators, foreign language students, expatriates, or anyone else interested in listening to a global view of world news and major events as they happen.

Whether you are an amateur radio operator or shortwave radio enthusiasts and want to get in on the action outside of the ham bands, then this new electronic book from Teak Publishing is a must in your radio reference library.

-30-


Saturday, July 14, 2018

From the Isle of Music & Uncle Bill's Melting Pot schedules



From the Isle of Music, July 15-21
This week, our special guest is trovador Pedro Luis Ferrer, who also spent a couple of years in the Rock/Pop group Los Dada. We will listen to some archival music of that group plus selections from Mr. Ferrer's recordings over the years.   Some other surprises as well.

Four options to listen to the transmission:
1. For Eastern Europe but audible well beyond the target area in most of the Eastern Hemisphere (including parts of East Asia and Oceania) with 100Kw, Sunday 1500-1600 UTC on SpaceLine, 9400 kHz, from Kostinbrod, Bulgaria (1800-1900 MSK)

2. For the Americas and parts of Europe, Tuesday 0000-0100 UTC on WBCQ, 7490 KHz from Monticello, ME, USA (Monday 8-9PM EST in the US). This has been audible in parts of NW, Central and Southern Europe with an excellent skip to Italy recently.

3 & 4. For Europe and sometimes beyond, Tuesday 1900-2000 UTC and Saturday 1200-1300 UTC on Channel 292, 6070 KHz from Rohrbach, Germany.




Uncle Bill's Melting Pot, Sun, July 15 & Tues, July 17, 2018
Episode 71, Play Any Vegetable, is dedicated to vegetables including music played on carrots and other edible instruments.
The broadcasts take place:

1. Sundays 2200-2230 UTC (6:00PM -6:30PM Eastern US) on
WBCQ The Planet 7490 KHz from the US to the Americas and parts of Europe

2. Tuesdays 2000-2030 UTC on Channel 292, 6070 KHz from Rohrbach, Germany for Europe. If current propagation conditions hold, the broadcast should reach from Iceland to Western Russia, Scandinavia down to North Africa and the Middle East, AND a long bounce to parts of New Zealand.
William "Bill" Tilford, Owner/Producer
Tilford Productions, LLC

Friday, July 13, 2018

Voice of Indonesia active, though irregular on shortwave


The World Radio TV Handbook summer schedule update on 11 July 2018, is reporting that Voice of Indonesia is active, through broadcasting irregularly. The station is being relayed via Radio Republik Indonesia, Palangkaraya, using their 10 kW domestic service transmitter.

For 'Country-Counters', Palangkaraya is counted as Kalimantan/Borneo on the NASWA County List. This would be an excellent opportunity to add this to your country totals. Prior to this shift, Voice of Indonesia counted as Java.

Revised complete schedule, broadcasting daily when active

All times UTC

Arabic
1600-1700 3325do

Chinese
1100-1200 3325do
1500-1600 3325do

English
1000-1100 3325do
1300-1400 3325do
1900-2000 3325do

French
2000-2100 3325do

German
1800-1900 3325do

Indonesian
1400-1500 3325do

Japanese
1200-1300 3325do

Spanish
1700-1800 3325do

Station website: http:www.voinews.id
Station Contact Us link: http://www.voinews.id/index.php/contact-us
Email: email  : voi@voinews.id

Shortwave Radiogram schedules, July 13-16


Images from March 2018 programming
Hello friends,

Last week’s broadcast Saturday on 9400 kHz from Bulgaria went off the air a few minutes after Shortwave Radiogram began at 1600 UTC. At least on Twitter, @SWRadiogram and followers, we had fund speculating about why the transmitter went off the air (e.g., Kim broke another transmitter) and if it would return to the air before the end of the half hour (it didn’t).

A video of that ill-fated Saturday 1600 UTC broadcast is provided by Ralf in Germany, with the addition of the same broadcast quickly uploaded to Soundcloud to provide an alternative to the missing shortwave. (The images were very clear!) Another video of the Sunday 2330-2400 UTC show on 7780 kHz from WRMI Florida is provided by Scott in Ontario. An audio archive is available from Mark in the UK. And analysis of program 55 was prepared by Roger in Germany. 

Also during the past week, Shortwave Radiogram listeners were receiving and decoding SSTV images from the International Space Station. Complete sets of images were received by Gaudenzio in Italy and Mercouris in Greece. (To generate more interest in Shortwave Radiogram, I need to find a way to transmit the show from orbit.)

This weekend is our usual pattern of MFSK32 and MFSK64, with four interesting news stories and seven images.

Here is the lineup for Shortwave Radiogram, program 56, 13-16 July 2018, in MFSK modes as noted:

 1:34  MFSK32: Program preview
 2:47  Climate change causing extreme weather*
 8:10  MFSK64: Spiders use electric fields to take flight*
13:18  Young stars visible in new infrared image*
16:26  Ham-designed gear used in Thailand cave rescue*
20:05  Images of the week*
26:15  MFSK32: Closing announcements

* with image(s)

Please send reception reports to radiogram@verizon.net

And visit http://swradiogram.net

Twitter: @SWRadiogram

Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/567099476753304

Shortwave Radiogram Program 56
(13-16 July 2018)

Friday 2030-2100 UTC 7780 kHz
5950 kHz MFSK32
MFSK64 WRMI Florida
Saturday 1600-1630 UTC 9400 kHz Space Line, Bulgaria
Sunday 2330-2400 UTC 7780 kHz WRMI Florida
Monday 0800-0830 UTC
  7730 kHz
5850 kHz WRMI Florida

The Mighty KBC transmits to Europe Saturdays at 1500-1600 UTC on 9400 kHz (via Bulgaria), with the minute of MFSK64 at about 1530 UTC (if you are outside of Europe, listen via websdr.ewi.utwente.nl:8901/ ).  And to North America Sundays at 0000-0200 UTC (Saturday 8-10 pm EDT) on 9925 kHz, via Germany. The minute of MFSK64 is at about 0130 UTC.  Reports to Eric: themightykbc@gmail.com . See also http://www.kbcradio.eu/ and https://www.facebook.com/TheMightyKbc/.  

Italian Broadcasting Corporation (IBC)  Five minutes of MFSK32 is at the end of the 30-minute English-language “Shortwave Panorama. For the complete IBC transmission schedule visit  http://ibcradio.webs.com/ 

Broad Spectrum Radio is transmitted by WRMI Florida Mondays at 0700-0800 UTC on 5850 and 7730 kHz. MFSK32 is broadcast during the second half hour of the show. Reports to broadspectrumradio@gmail.com.

Thanks for your reception reports! 

Kim Andrew Elliott, KD9XB
Producer and Presenter
Shortwave Radiogram
Reporting on international broadcasting at https://twitter.com/kaedotcom


Radio DARC upcoming special weekend broadcast


With 300kW from Wittenberg via Vienna to North America

Wittenberg. (xv) The WRTC will be covered in two special broadcasts by Radio DARC. The radio show of the German Amateur Radio Club e.V. will broadcast a program in English on Saturday, July 14 from 11.00 to 12.00 UTC using the 49m shortwave band on 6070 kHz. Especially for the many people interested in WRTC from North America, the program will also be broadcast on 13860 kHz at the same time. The six-hour time difference makes it possible for the show to serve as a "breakfast radio" WRTC News on the East Coast of North America. There is expected to be a high level of interest from North America as not only did a total of 14 teams from North America qualify but also the defending champions Daniel Craig (N6MJ) and Chris Hurlbut (KL9A) are from the USA.
Source: http://www.wrtc2018.de/en/
WRTC: World Radiosport Team Championship for amateur radio, this year organized in Germany

Tuesday, July 10, 2018

BBC's Global audience rises to 376 million


Date: 22.06.2018     Last updated: 27.06.2018 at 14.26
Category: World Service
The BBC is reaching a record weekly audience of 376m people, new figures published today reveal.
The figures - the Global Audience Measure (GAM) - show how many adults the BBC reached weekly with its news and entertainment content in the year 2017/18.
The BBC World Service, which has just undertaken its biggest expansion since the 1940s, has seen its audience increase by 10m, to 279m.
The total global news audience has risen by a million, to 347m.
The GAM shows the way people access their news is continuing to change around the world. With the increased availability of cheap smartphones around the world, audiences are continuing to switch to digital platforms for news. Overall, online news website audiences have grown by four million, with social media audiences up by nine million.
The English language international website, BBC.com, continues to perform well even in competitive markets like the USA, adding two million weekly users this year.
More people listen directly to World Service English via the internet than by any other method - a total of 27m. And World Service English podcasts now reach one million people every week.
Additional story at: http://www.bbc.co.uk/mediacentre/latestnews/2018/bbc-global-audience

The Highest Powered Mediumwave Station in the Southern Hemisphere


On previous occasions here in Wavescan, we have presented Part 1 and Part 2 in a four part mini-series on the topic of The Highest Powered Mediumwave Station in the Southern Hemisphere, the story of 2CO in Corowa New South Wales.  Today, we present Part 3 in this same series, and that will take us to a country relay station in another Australian state, this time the state of South Australia.

It was on June 23, 1929 that the Australian Broadcasting Company (ABCo) was formed, and they took over a total of eight mediumwave stations in six Australian states that were already on the air.  During their three year tenure of office, the shortlived ABCo established four more mediumwave stations, two of which both qualified for the title of the Highest Powered Mediumwave Station in the Southern Hemisphere.  These two stations were the aforementioned 2CO in Corowa, and then the South Australian 5CK in Crystal Brook, both of which utilized Australian assembled STC transmitters rated with an output power of 7½ kW.

The new 5CK at Crystal Brook was established to give radio coverage to the industrial city of Port Pirie and its surrounding agricultural areas.  Port Pirie was declared South Australia’s first
provincial city (1953), and it is the state’s second largest port, after Port Adelaide itself.

The new ABCo regional relay station 5CK was installed at a country location on Gladstone Road, three miles from the small town of Crystal Brook.  The new mediumwave transmitter, rated at 7½ kW output on 635 kHz, was installed in a newly constructed transmitter building.

Two lattice style steel towers 185 feet tall were erected 265 feet apart, and suspended between these two towers was a center fed Alexanderson style antenna system.  At each end of the antenna system was a drop down lead to earth, with a special tuning coli in a tuning hut for each. 

The antenna system at 5CK was similar in design and style to the somewhat larger antenna system that was erected for station 2CO three months earlier.  Described as a Multiple Tuning System, only three of these systems were ever erected in Australia; the aforementioned 2CO in Corowa New South Wales, this regional mediumwave station 5CK near Crystal Brook in South Australia, and the “new” 6WF when it was transferred from the Westralian Farmers Building in downtown Perth and rebuilt at Wanneroo in Western Australia (1934), two years after 5CK  was inaugurated. 

It will be remembered that the radio station at Wanneroo in Western Australia was also home to the ABC shortwave transmitters VLW and VLX, as well as for Radio Australia programming beamed to South Africa, Asia, and Antarctica.

Programming for the new 5CK came by landline from 5CL in Adelaide, with occasional local
inserts from a small studio in nearby Port Pirie.  The official opening ceremony was conducted at the 5CL studios in Hindmarsh Square in Adelaide on March 15, 1932, and one of the main speakers was the Post Master General Mr. James E. Fenton, who spoke from Canberra by landline.

Reception reports for the new 5CK were received from listeners throughout Australia, far and wide.  Listeners in Sydney and country Lismore in New South Wales, and in country Victoria, proclaimed triumphantly that the new 5CK was the strongest signal from any radio station in Australia.

As time went by, an additional new mediumwave station 5AN joined the studio production team in Hindmarsh Square, and this new station then provided most of the landline programming to 5CK.  To this day, 5CK is still on the air under its original callsign, and it now radiates 10 kW on 639 kHz.

It is true, that back then in the early 1930s, both 2CO in Corowa and 5CK in Crystal Brook were the most powerful mediumwave broadcasting stations in Australia, and also in the Southern
Hemisphere.  However, they did not retain that honor for very long; station 2YA in Wellington in the
sister dominion New Zealand soon took over that honor.  And that’s our story next time, when we present another episode of the interesting historic topic, The Highest Powered Mediumwave Station in the Southern Hemisphere.
(AWR-Wavescan/NWS 489)

Monday, July 09, 2018

DXers Unlimited, weekend edition

Special thanks to Arnie Coro, for sharing his program script from July 8

Radio Havana Cuba
for Sunday July 8 2018
By Arnie Coro,CO2KK

Hola amigos radioaficionados... hi my radio hobby friends all around the world... YES, it is time, right now to enjoy about ten minutes of all radio hobby related information coming to you from Havana, Cuba. I am your host, Arnaldo, Arnie , Coro and here is item one of today's show:
Very good news about the present and future of amateur radio here in Cuba.... Results of the most recent amateur radio license tests follow.

Joel Carrazana Valdés CO6JC the webmaster of the Federación de Radioaficionados de Cuba (FRC) has posted the results of the amateur radio exams in Cuba

Three-hundred twenty-three candidates took the ham radio exams for one of the three categories of amateur radio tests in the first half of 2018 and 310 obtained a license. This is an increase in candidates over last year. The overall pass rate was an impressive 95.97%. I have no doubt that the very high marks are due to the Amateur Radio Academy Program implemented at the Cuban radio clubs for the past several years... For your information...

There are three license categories in Cuba:
CO 1st Category - All bands with up to 2,000 watts output CM 2nd Category - HF/VHF/UHF with up to 100 watts output CL 3rd Category - part of 1.8/3.5/5/7/144 MHz bands with 10 watts output

The number of exam passes for the three license categories were:
36 category 1, 53 category 2, 221 category 3.

The pass rates for the three levels of exams were:
92.3% category 1, 94.6% category 2, 96.9% category 3

In all cases, the examination was carried out with the formalities required by this act and characterized by the solemnity and respect that has always been present."

So, we will soon more Cuban stations on the HF bands as those third class licensees that upgrade will start operating especially on the 40 meters band.

High frequency HF bands propagation conditions continue to be very poor due to the extremely low solar activity, with several consecutive days , with a totally blank Solar disc.y. During Friday and Saturday e weekend propagation on the HF bands was very poor,. Si amigos, yes , no surprise as this is typical of the tail end of a solar cycle, nothing abnormal at all... but it is certainly quite disgusting to tune around the short wave spectrum and hear nothing or very weak signals that only sophisticated digital modes can pick up!!!
 
According to the most recent forecasts, next year it is going to be worse , with extended periods of much lower solar activity, that may combine with solar events that will further disrupt propagation conditions.  Now, the HF bands from 7 to 30 megaHertz will  show the the typical summer season patterns of the Northern Hemisphere and the winter patterns will be showing up in the Southern Hemisphere. For those of us that live North of the Equator, one of the most interesting effects of summer propagation is a consequence of the lower electron density of the ionosphere...
At times during the winter months  in  solar minimum years the maximum usable frequency at night may drop even below the six megaHertz band amigos !!! More about medium wave band and short wave bands propagation at the end of the program.

Now here is item two: Producing very valuable results is a very original application that runs on practically any computer that makes possible to see the results of the REVERSE BEACON NETWORK... an amazing achievement accomplished by volunteer amateur radio operators from many countries around the world. I won't attempt to describe here how the receiving stations that are known as quote ¨skimmers¨ unquote, automatically pick up amateur CW Morse radiotelegraphy and RTTY signals that are calling CQ, and then also by means of an automated subrutine measure the CW transmission speed and the signal to noise ratio... If it sounds to you as science fiction, it is certainly not, and the Reverse Beacon Network is adding yet another tool monitor digital modes too in order to learn more about the extremely complex phenomena that make possible ionospheric short wave propagation... t You may want to visit the home page of the Reverse Beacon Network after calling CQ on CW if you already are an amateur radio station operator, and just learn , for example, what is happening when your friend Arnie Coro called CQ on the ham bands the last time he was on the air.... Just type the following URL on your Internet browser search line:
http://www.reversebeacon.net/srch.php

Okay, it is a little long, so I will say it again slowly http://www.reversebeacon.net/srch.php
Then when the site opens and asks for whom you are looking for, type the callsign  and you will see the latest spots on each of the ham bands where that station I called CQ...
Now stay tuned for more radio hobby related information coming to you from sunny La Habana , Cuba

This is Radio Havana Cuba coming to you via short wave and also from the streaming audio at www.radiohc.cu  , I am Arnie Coro and here is now the next item of the weekend edition of Dxers Unlimited...

Here is now ASK ARNIE, la numero uno, the most popular section of the show... answering today a question sent by listeners from the United States, Mexico, Canada, Argentina Barbados, Nigeria, South Africa and the Netherlands... they all wanted to know if possible when solar activity will again reach levels of solar flux past the 100 units mark..

Well amigos, this is quite a challenging question that may lead to yet another controversy, because there are many opinions as regards to WHEN the new solar cycle enters into its most active phase reaching the 100 average solar flux units that will surely improve the HF bands propagation. Some gurus say that solar cycle 25 will be even worse than this present very poor cycle 24... with the Sun entering into a new Dalton minimum !!!
Add to the complexity of the answer the fact that one must listen to widely different criteria by solar physics experts...
And now before going QRT , here is Arnie Coro's Dxers Unlimited propagation update and forecast...
(Arnie Coro/Radio Habana Cuba)












Ancient DX Report - 1914

Earlier this year, we presented Part 1 in our Ancient DX Report for the year 1914.  On that occasion, we presented the story of how World War 1 began, with the assassination of His Royal Highness the 50 year old Archduke Franz Ferdinand, Heir Presumptive to the throne of the ailing Austro-Hungarian Empire and his wife, Her Highness Sophie, the 46 year old Duchess of Hohenberg.

The royal couple were shot during a state visit to Sarajevo, the capital city of Bosnia, on Sunday morning June 28, 1914.  Exactly one month later, on July 28, Austria-Hungary declared war against Serbia, and Germany invaded France.  One week later again, England declared war against Germany.  World War 1 had begun, and the major wireless stations of the world were buzzing in Morse Code with the progressive stories of what was taking place as armies clashed against each other in continental Europe.

Germany was operating its own powerful wireless,station at Nauen, near Berlin.  This station had been established six years earlier as the “first wireless station in the world”, and it was rebuilt with a huge new antenna system just  few months before war was declared in Europe.  A major secondary station as a back up was established at Eilvese, near Hanover. 

France operated its own wireless station from the top of the famed Eiffel Tower, and they communicated with their armed forces and distant locations throughout the country in Morse Code from this station.  In April (1914), a commercial wireless receiver, the Ondophone, was placed on sale in France.  This commercially made early wireless receiver was developed so that people could receive accurate time signals from station FL on the Eiffel Tower. 

Over in Belgium, Robert Goldschmidt established a large wireless station at Laeken for the purpose of communication within the country, and also with their colony in Africa, the Belgian Congo.  On March 13 1914. he conducted a radio broadcast from this station as a test transmission.  Two weeks later on March 28, he began a series of Saturday music concerts over his new wireless station, and that event is claimed in Belgium as the second wireless station in the world, preceded only by the program broadcasts by Charles Herrold in California.  Nearly six months later, the large wireless station at Laeken was deliberately destroyed just prior to the German invasion of their country.

Over in the British Isles, the Marconi Wireless Telegraph Company constructed a 400 KW wireless transmitting station under the callsign MUU in Caernarvon in Wales in 1914 for transatlantic communication with the United States.  This station employed ten masts each 400 feet tall atop the Cefndu Mountain in Snowdonia.

By the year 1914, wireless equipment had been installed on a huge number of ships throughout the world; naval, passenger, and cargo.  The Cunard liner Acquitania had installed wireless equipment, even in two of its lifeboats. 

In May, a wireless message was heard in Asia stating that the Japanese passenger/cargo ship, the SS Siberia Maru, was aground and sinking off the coast of Formosa (Taiwan).  Next day, this ship arrived in Manila in the Philippines, unaware of the fake wireless message.     

Also during the month of May, the wireless executive David Sarnoff was aboard the American passenger/cargo ship SS Antilles on its run from New York to New Orleans and he tuned a radio receiver to hear a music program coming from the Wanamaker Store in New York.  In November, Mr W. C. Handy in Memphis Tennessee broadcast a radio program that featured Victor H. Laughter.

When the British declared war against Germany on August 4, the German wireless stations at Nauen and Eilvese sent out a general message in Morse Code to all German shipping to hasten to the nearest neutral port.  Two large German passenger ships, the Kronprinzessin Cecilie and the Koenig Wilhelm 2, entered American harbors in order to avoid capture by the British navy.  In addition, the German navy stationed several of its ships in a chain across the Atlantic for the purpose of establishing a cascade relay of messages in Morse Code to German colonies in Africa and Asia.

The United States commissioned a 100 kW spark transmitter at Colon in the Panama Canal Zone; and they also established a wireless circuit between California and the new station at Kahuku on Oahu in the Hawaiian Islands, the “largest wireless station in the world”.

In Australia, two new wireless stations were taken into service during the year 1914, both on the west coast; VIZ was commissioned at Roebourne on January 26, and VIW was commissioned at Wyndham on May 18.  The Wyndham station was constructed out of town against a 1500 ft hill, with the antenna on top.   

With the threatened exigencies of war, the Royal Australian Navy suddenly required a wireless communication station.  They contracted with AWA in Sydney, and in just four days a brand new 11 kW Morse Code wireless station was installed on Sydney Harbour’s Garden Island, under the callsign VKQ.

The first military action for the Australian army at the beginning of World War 1 in 1914 was the successful capture of German wireless stations that were located in Rabaul on the island of New Britain, on the island of Yap in the Caroline Islands, and on the Pacific island of Nauru.  The first military action for the New Zealand army at the beginning of World War 1 was the successful capture of the German wireless station near Apia in Samoa.

Just before the outbreak of World War 1 in 1914, German personnel were finalizing the construction and initial operation of two major wireless stations in New Zealand, VLA at Awanui on the North Island and Awarua on the South Island.  These wireless specialists were working with the Telefunken company in Germany and they were under contract with the Australasian Wireless Company for the project in New Zealand.  Work on these two wireless stations was sped up so that the German personnel could return to Germany before war broke out.
(AWR/Wavescan/NWS 488)

A nostalgic look at Radio Veritas Asia


According to the best available information, the shortwave station Radio Veritas Asia made its final broadcast just yesterday Saturday June 30, and the transmitter now lies silent in an isolated and lonely Philippine countryside.  In our program here in Wavescan last week, we presented the story of Radio Veritas on mediumwave, and this week we present the story of Radio Veritas Asia on shortwave.    
As with the mediumw ave story of Radio Veritas last week, so with the shortwave story of Radio Veritas Asia this week; we go back to the beginning, which was just after the end of the tragic Pacific War in the middle of last century.  Back during that era, most of the radio stations that began to appear on the radio dial in the Philippines were a dual operation, on both mediumwave and shortwave.  The mediumwave transmitter gave mostly reliable local coverage, and the shortwave transmitter served a double purpose; to provide fill in coverage for mediumwave shadow spots, and also for national coverage.

Shortwave station KZOK was inaugurated in Manila at the end of July 1947 with just 250 watts on 9690 kHz.  The transmitter was built by Technical Radio in San Francisco California, and the antenna system was a dipole antenna, oriented north and south for nationwide coverage.  Even at such low power, the shortwave station was heard over in England in islandic Europe, as well as you might expect down under in Australia and New Zealand in the South Pacific.  

During that initial era, the station was owned by PBC the Philippine Broadcasting Corporation and the programming was produced in their temporary studios on the 5th and 6th floors of the Pilipinas Building at Plaza Moraga in Manila.  The two transmitters, mediumwave and shortwave, were both located in Quezon City.  Mediumwave and shortwave KZOK was a sister station to the better known KZPI, and their QSL card showed the callsign KZOK in large red letters across the center of the card. 

On January 1, 1949, the Philippines implemented a new callsign sequence for radio stations throughout their island archipelago, in line with the then recently promulgated international radio regulations.  In addition, these two PBC stations were granted a change in their own callsigns, and thus mediumwave station KZOK became DZAB, and shortwave KZOK became DZH5.  Back then, the generic callsign DZH indicated a shortwave broadcasting station in the Manila area, and the number identified a specific shortwave station; in this case DZH5 identified the shortwave station associated with mediumwave DZAB. 

Two years later during the year 1951, station DZAB-DZH5 was taken over by the Catholic operated Santo Tomas University, and it was installed in the university’s Main Building.  At this stage, a new mediumwave callsign was granted, DZST, with the ST standing for the initials of the university, Santo Tomas.  They also issued a QSL card to verify listener reception reports.

However, on December 10, 1958, a high level committee that was meeting at the university gave approval for establishing a high powered mediumwave and shortwave station that would provide better coverage throughout the Philippines, and also for international coverage into the highly populated countries of Asia.  Soon afterwards, land was procured in a rice field on the edge of MacArthur Highway, at Barangay-Dakila on the southern edge of the large regional city, Malolos, some 20 miles northwest of Manila.

Two 100 kW Siemens transmitters were procured from Germany, and test broadcasts began from the first unit on 21675 kHz on November 10, 1967.  This new radio station near Malolos was granted a new sequence in callsigns, and mediumwave DZST became DZVR, with the VR of course indicating Veritas Radio.  The two shortwave transmitters were identified as DZN7 and DZN8.  The second transmitter was taken into service during the following year 1968.  

A new suite of studios was installed in the Catholic Center on United Nations Avenue in Manila, and programming was microwaved to Malolos in a special set of eleven channels, six broadcast and five telephone. 

However, the new Radio Veritas Asia was beset with problematic circumstances that took many years to resolve.  The two German made transmitters malfunctioned, experienced staffing was not available, studio production in the various languages of Asia was not well established, and lack of adequate funding was always a problem. 

For the next six years, from 1967 into 1973, Radio Veritas Asia was on the air with mainly just test broadcasts, made up of usually classical music and test announcements in English.  Interestingly back then, Vatican Radio was interested in the development of Radio Veritas Asia, and they also asked for reception reports of Veritas, with the intent of possibly using the Philippine station as a part time relay for Vatican programming.  

Ultimately in August 1973, Radio Veritas Asia went silent, while awaiting parts from Germany, and also while awaiting the modification and upgrading of the two 100 kW transmitters.  However during this interim period, Radio Veritas took over the 50 kW Gates shortwave transmitter from Radio SEARV, which had recently gone silent at Dumaguete in the southern Philippines through lack of funding.

Radio Veritas Asia was re-opened in May 1975, and the first test broadcasts from the newly installed 50 kW were noted in New Zealand and Australia on 9570 kHz and 11710 kHz.  Again, the test broadcasts consisted of music, and announcements in English.

Finally, the two 100 kW Siemens transmitters were re-activated, and they were taken into service in mid 1977.  Over a period of time, the test broadcasts were phased into regular programming in more than a dozen languages.  By this time, they were utilizing six antennas with various configurations, including log periodic, rhombic and cage.
     

All went well for the next ten years, until violent political disturbances swept across the entire nation.  Then, on Sunday and Monday February 23 and 24, 1986, insurgents stormed into the transmitter station at Malolos and badly damaged all of the transmitters, three shortwave and two medium wave, and also some of the antenna systems, though fortunately no personnel were harmed. 

As a result, a brand new transmitter station was quickly constructed at a new location, with funding from Catholics in Germany, as well as from the German government itself.  The new shortwave station was constructed near Palauig, almost at the northern tip of a jungle covered small tidal peninsula known as Luan Island.  This Luan Island/tidal peninsula occupies just .1 of a square mile, and it is located 100 air miles northwest from Manila, and 70 miles from its previous location at Malolos. 

Over a period of time, three large 250 kW shortwave transmitters were installed at the new Palauig site, each of which was a variation of the Swiss made Model SK53C3.  The first was inaugurated in 1986; the second in 1988; and the third in 1992.  Eighteen years after it was taken into service, the very first transmitter was dismantled, leaving just the two slightly younger transmitters to carry the full load of programming.

Throughout its more than half a century of on air service, this well known shortwave radio facility with its many consecutive callsigns, has always been a reliable verifier of listener reception reports.  In its latter years, these cards pictured Philippine regional scenes in full color.

Last Saturday (June 30, 2018), shortwave Radio Veritas Asia was closed.  So, what is left now of shortwave Radio Veritas Asia?  

It is stated that the elaborate studio building in Quezon City will remain in service, preparing programming in Chinese Mandarin for distribution over the internet, and Filipinas programming for distribution over a smart phone. 

The original transmitter building on the edge of Malolos was abandoned seven years ago, though efforts are underway to restore it as a historic museum piece. 

The shortwave facility of Radio Veritas Asia on Luan Island near Palauig lies silent, and somewhat abandoned.  What will happen to it next?  Well, we don’t know, but perhaps the future will provide another interesting chapter in this fascinating radio saga in the Philippine Islands
(AWR-Wavescan/NWS 488)

Weely Propagationa Forecast Bulletins



Product: Weekly Highlights and Forecasts
:Issued: 2018 Jul 09 0254 UTC
# Prepared by the US Dept. of Commerce, NOAA, Space Weather Prediction Center
# Product description and SWPC web contact http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/weekly.html#
#                Weekly Highlights and Forecasts
#
Highlights of Solar and Geomagnetic Activity 02 - 08 July 2018
Solar activity was very low levels through most of the reporting period. However, on 06 Jul, A C1 flare was observed at 06/2007 UTC from an area of enhanced flux, as observed in STEREO AHEAD 195 imagery, from around the E. limb. The area later rotated onto the visible disk as spotless plage. Several DSFs were observed on 05 Jul from the NE quadrant, though none were thought to have produced Earth-directed CMEs.

A coronal dimming in the SW quadrant was observed in SDO/AIA 193, around 04/2325 UTC, which was followed by an observation of a slow-moving CME first observed in STEREO AHEAD COR2 imagery beginning around 04/0324 UTC. No clear signature was observed in SOHO LASCO C2 or C3 imagery. Modeling of the event suggested the possibility of an Earth-directed component becoming geoeffective sometime after 09 Jul.

No proton events were observed at geosynchronous orbit. The greater than 2 MeV electron flux at geosynchronous orbit was at moderate to high levels on 02-04 Jul and decreased to normal to
moderate levels on 05-08 Jul.

Geomagnetic field activity ranged from quiet to G1 (Minor) geomagnetic storm levels. Quiet conditions were observed from 02-04 Jul. A SSBC on 05 Jul increased total magnetic field strength to 12 nT and solar wind speeds to around 450 km/s. The field response increased from quiet to an isolated period of G1 (Minor) storm levels. Wind speeds continued between 400-525 km/s for the remainder of the reporting period; however, only quiet conditions were observed after 06/0300 UTC.

Forecast of Solar and Geomagnetic Activity 09 July - 04 August 2018
Solar activity is expected to be at very low levels throughout the outlook period.

No proton events are expected at geosynchronous orbit. The greater than 2 MeV electron flux at geosynchronous orbit is expected to range from normal to high levels. Normal to moderate
levels are expected from 09-20 Jul and 01-04 Aug; moderate to high levels are expected from 21-31 Jul. All enhancements in electron flux are anticipated in response to recurrent CH HSSs.

Geomagnetic field activity is expected to range from quiet to G1 (Minor) geomagnetic storm levels. A slow-moving CME, first observed early on 05 Jul, is forecast to cause active levels on 09 Jul and
unsettled levels on 10 Jul. Influences from multiple, recurrent, CH HSSs are expected to increase geomagnetic activity to unsettled levels on 16 Jul, 21 Jul and 24 Jul; active levels are likely on 15
Jul, 20 Jul, 22 Jul; G1 (Minor) storm levels are likely on 23 Jul. The remainder of the forecast period is expected to produce quiet levels under nominal solar wind conditions.

Product: 27-day Space Weather Outlook Table 27DO.txt
:Issued: 2018 Jul 09 0254 UTC
# Prepared by the US Dept. of Commerce, NOAA, Space Weather Prediction Center
# Product description and SWPC web contact http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/wwire.html
#
#      27-day Space Weather Outlook Table
#                Issued 2018-07-09
#
#   UTC      Radio Flux   Planetary   Largest
#  Date       10.7 cm      A Index    Kp Index
2018 Jul 09      72          12          4
2018 Jul 10      72           8          3
2018 Jul 11      74           5          2
2018 Jul 12      76           5          2
2018 Jul 13      76           5          2
2018 Jul 14      76           5          2
2018 Jul 15      76          16          4
2018 Jul 16      76           8          3
2018 Jul 17      76           5          2
2018 Jul 18      76           5          2
2018 Jul 19      76           5          2
2018 Jul 20      76          15          4
2018 Jul 21      74           8          3
2018 Jul 22      72          10          4
2018 Jul 23      72          18          5
2018 Jul 24      70           8          3
2018 Jul 25      68           5          2
2018 Jul 26      68           5          2
2018 Jul 27      68           5          2
2018 Jul 28      68           5          2
2018 Jul 29      68           5          2
2018 Jul 30      68           5          2
2018 Jul 31      68           5          2
2018 Aug 01     68           5          2
2018 Aug 02     68           5          2
2018 Aug 03     70           5          2
2018 Aug 04     72           5          2
(NOAA)

Saturday, July 07, 2018

From the Isle of Music & Uncle Bill's Melting Pot schedules


From the Isle of Music, July 8-14:
This week, our special guest is clarinetist/composer Ernesto Vega. He will share some of his first album, Venir al Mundo and some of his work in Familia by Arturo O'Farrill and Chucho Valdés.
Four options to listen to the transmission:

1. For Eastern Europe but audible well beyond the target area in most of the Eastern Hemisphere (including parts of East Asia and Oceania) with 100Kw, Sunday 1500-1600 UTC on SpaceLine, 9400 KHz, from Kostinbrod, Bulgaria (1800-1900 MSK)

2. For the Americas and parts of Europe, Tuesday 0000-0100 UTC on WBCQ, 7490 KHz from Monticello, ME, USA (Monday 8-9PM EST in the US). This has been audible in parts of NW, Central and Southern Europe with an excellent skip to Italy recently.

3 & 4. For Europe and sometimes beyond, Tuesday 1900-2000 UTC and Saturday 1200-1300 UTC on Channel 292, 6070 KHz from Rohrbach, Germany.

Uncle Bill's Melting Pot, Sun, July 8 & Tues, July 10, 2018
Episode 70 explores some musical aspects of Afrofuturism, a movement with incorporates avant garde Jazz and electronica among other things.
The broadcasts take place:

1. Sundays 2200-2230 UTC (6:00PM -6:30PM Eastern US) on
WBCQ The Planet 7490 KHz from the US to the Americas and parts of Europe

2. Tuesdays 2000-2030 UTC on Channel 292, 6070 KHz from Rohrbach, Germany for Europe. If current propagation conditions hold, the broadcast should reach from Iceland to Western Russia, Scandinavia down to North Africa and the Middle East, AND a long bounce to parts of New Zealand.
William "Bill" Tilford, Owner/Producer
Tilford Productions, LLC

Friday, July 06, 2018

Shortwave Radiogram schedules, July 5-9


Hello friends,
Last weekend’s experiment with 8PSK-125F and 8PSK-250F was generally unsuccessful. This is despite improvements to the encoding and decoding of these 8PSK modes in Fldigi 4.0.17. Most listeners’ reports showed errors in the 8PSK text, while the MFSK 32 and 64 text generally decoded 100%, as usual. 

Videos of last weekend’s Shortwave Radiogram are provided by Ralf in Germany (Saturday 1600 UTC) and Scott in Ontario (Sunday 2330 UTC). An audio archive is available from Mark in the UK. And analysis of program 54 was prepared by Roger in Germany (who somehow managed 100% decode of the 8PSK modes).  

This weekend we return to our usual pattern of MFSK32, then MFSK64, including ten images. 

Here is the lineup for Shortwave Radiogram, program 55, 6-9 July 2018, in MFSK modes as noted:

 1:31  MFSK32: Program preview 
 2:36  Asteroid belt may be remains of a half-dozen planets*
 9:18  MFSK64: Did heavy rain give Mars its deep valleys?*
12:47  Night of Nights maritime radio event on 12 July* 
15:22  This week's images*
28:06  MFSK32: Closing announcements

* with image(s)

Please send reception reports to radiogram@verizon.net

And visit http://swradiogram.net

Twitter: @SWRadiogram

Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/567099476753304

 Shortwave Radiogram Program 55
(6-9 July 2018)

Friday 2030-2100 UTC 7780 kHz
5950 kHz MFSK32
kjkkMFSK64 WRMI Florida
Saturday 1600-1630 UTC 9400 kHz Space Line, Bulgaria
Sunday 2330-2400 UTC 7780 kHz WRMI Florida
Monday 0800-0830 UTC
  7730 kHz
5850 kHz WRMI Florida

The Mighty KBC transmits to Europe Saturdays at 1500-1600 UTC on 9400 kHz (via Bulgaria), with the minute of MFSK64 at about 1530 UTC (if you are outside of Europe, listen via websdr.ewi.utwente.nl:8901/ ).  And to North America Sundays at 0000-0200 UTC (Saturday 8-10 pm EDT) on 9925 kHz, via Germany. The minute of MFSK64 is at about 0130 UTC.  Reports to Eric: themightykbc@gmail.com . See also http://www.kbcradio.eu/ and https://www.facebook.com/TheMightyKbc/.  

Italian Broadcasting Corporation (IBC)  Five minutes of MFSK32 is at the end of the 30-minute English-language “Shortwave Panorama. For the complete IBC transmission schedule visit  http://ibcradio.webs.com/  

Broad Spectrum Radio is transmitted by WRMI Florida Mondays at 0700-0800 UTC on 5850 and 7730 kHz. MFSK32 is broadcast during the second half hour of the show. Reports to broadspectrumradio@gmail.com.
Thanks for your reception reports!  

Kim

Kim Andrew Elliott, KD9XB
Producer and Presenter
Shortwave Radiogram
Reporting on international broadcasting at https://twitter.com/kaedotcom


Statement on Russia’s move against U.S. international media under foreign agent law


On the morning of July 5, in what can only be interpreted as an attack on independent media serving Russian audiences, a Moscow court fined Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty (RFE/RL) after ruling that it had failed to comply with a new Russian law regulating media outlets branded by the government as “foreign agents.” That law has been applied only to RFE/RL, a non-profit organization funded by Congress, and to the Voice of America (VOA).
U.S. international media are protected by a legislated firewall that guarantees the editorial independence of their content. Therefore neither RFE/RL nor anyone who works for them is an agent of the United States government. The law is clearly a political attack on an influential U.S. institution and an attempt to discredit the accurate, reliable news we provide to Russian audiences every day.
In addition to discouraging the free exchange of ideas, this law wrongfully stigmatizes our journalists and puts them at risk.
Yesterday’s ruling, an escalation in a targeted campaign against RFE/RL and VOA, is worrying and unacceptable, but it will not deter us from our mission to inform and engage people—in Russia and around the world—in support of freedom and democracy.
(John F. Lansing/BBG Chief Executive Officer & Director)