Friday, September 21, 2018

From the Isle of Music & Uncle Bill's Melting Pot schedules



From the Isle of Music, September 16-October 6:
September 16-22, our special guest will be Alejandro Vargas with his excellent Jazz.
September 23-29, we will feature the music of several of Cuba's excellent female vocalists from various decades.

September 30-October 6, we will feature Rafael Monteagudo with his excellent Jazz.
The transmissions take place:
1. For Eastern Europe but audible well beyond the target area in most of the Eastern Hemisphere (including parts of East Asia and Oceania) with 100Kw, Sunday 1500-1600 UTC on SpaceLine, 9400 KHz, from Kostinbrod, Bulgaria (1800-1900 MSK)

2. For the Americas and parts of Europe, Tuesday 0000-0100 UTC on WBCQ, 7490 KHz from Monticello, ME, USA (Monday 8-9PM EST in the US). This has been audible in parts of NW, Central and Southern Europe with an excellent skip to Italy recently.

3-4. For Europe and sometimes beyond, Tuesday 1900-2000 UTC and Saturday 1200-1300 UTC on Channel 292, 6070 KHz from Rohrbach, Germany.

Also recommended:
Jetzt geht’s los! (Here We Go!), an excellent program of early German Jazz produced by Radio Ohne Nahmen, comes on right before FTIOM on Tuesdays from 1800-1900 UTC on Channel 292.



Uncle Bill’s Melting Pot, September 16 -October 2, 2018
Episode 80 (September 16 and 18) features music from Russia from the 1970s to now.
Episode 81 (September 23 and 25) features music from Ukraine.
Episode 82 (September 30 and October 2) features virtuosic accordion music from around the planet.

The transmissions take place:
1. Sundays 2200-2230 UTC (6:00PM -6:30PM Eastern US) on
WBCQ The Planet 7490 KHz from the US to the Americas and parts of Europe
2. Tuesdays 2000-2030 UTC on Channel 292, 6070 kHz from Rohrbach, Germany for Europe. If current propagation conditions hold, the broadcast should reach from Iceland to Western Russia, Scandinavia down to North Africa and the Middle East, AND a long bounce to parts of New Zealand.

Also recommended:
Marion’s Attic, a unique program produced and hosted by Marion Webster featuring early 20th Century records, Edison cylinders etc played on the original equipment, comes on immediately before UBMP on Sundays from 2100-2200 UTC on WBCQ 7490 Khz.
William "Bill" Tilford, Owner/Producer
Tilford Productions, LLC

Shortwave Radiogram weekend schedules


Hello friends,


Thanks to everyone who participated in last weekend’s exercise to eliminate slant in MFSK images.  Many of you did not see any slant to begin with. This usually happens with direct reception. But if reception is through an SDR, another sound card is involved, increasing the chance for a clash in the sampling rates. This tweet shows how I was able to eliminate the slant during the first image of vertical lines, so that the lines were perfectly (at least to my eye) vertical during the second image.

Recording Shortwave Radiogram gives you another opportunity to eliminate any slant in your MFSK images. You can make the RX ppm adjustment in Fldigi, or use the Audacity software to change the speed of your recording. A (+)100 ppm adjustment in Fldigi would be the same as a (+).01% adjustment in the speed of your playback.

Videos of last weekend’s Shortwave Radiogram are provided by Scott in Ontario (Friday 2030 UTC),  2010DFS in Japan (Saturday 1600 UTC) (see also his Twitter thread showing an inexpensive D-808 receiver connected to a Beverage antenna; his use of a voice recorder might have added additional slant, which he corrected in time for the second image of vertical lines), by Ralf in Germany (Saturday 1600 UTC). Mark in the UK maintains an audio archive. Roger in Germany provided analysis.

This weekend’s Shortwave Radiogram will be in our usual combination of MFSK32, MFSK128, and MFSK64, with maybe a mystery mode (and mystery image – to save it, click Save) during the closing music. The show will include eight MFSK images.

Here is the lineup for Shortwave Radiogram, program 66, 21-24 September 2018, in MFSK modes as noted:

  1:38  MFSK32: Program preview
 2:55  US requiring registration of Chinese media in the USA*
 7:09  MFSK128: Wasps play a crucial role in the ecosystem*
10:36  MFSK64: TESS space telescope spots its first exoplanet*
13:35  Remote island bounces back after its rats are eliminated*
19:19  This week's images*
27:07  MFSK32: Closing announcements

* with image(s)

Please send reception reports to radiogram@verizon.net


Twitter: @SWRadiogram or https://twitter.com/swradiogram (visit especially during the weekend)



Shortwave Radiogram Program 66
(21-24 September 2018)

Friday
2030-2100 UTC
7780 kHz
MFSK32
MFSK128
MFSK64
WRMI Florida
Saturday
1600-1630 UTC
9400 kHz
Space Line, Bulgaria
Sunday
2330-2400 UTC
7780 kHz
WRMI Florida
Monday
0800-0830 UTC

7730 kHz
5850 kHz
WRMI Florida

Slow Scan Radio transmits SSTV images and text modes Wednesdays at 1830-1900 UTC on 6070 kHz via Channel 292 in Germany. The website is http://www.slowscanradio.com. Reception reports to  x@xdv.me.

The Mighty KBC transmits to Europe Saturdays at 1500-1600 UTC on 9400 kHz (via Bulgaria), with the minute of MFSK at about 1530 UTC (if you are outside of Europe, listen via websdr.ewi.utwente.nl:8901/ ).  And to North America Sundays at 0000-0200 UTC (Saturday 8-10 pm EDT) on the new winter frequency of 5960 kHz, via Germany. The minute of MFSK is at about 0130 UTC.  Reports to Eric: themightykbc@gmail.com . See also http://www.kbcradio.eu/ and https://www.facebook.com/TheMightyKbc/

Italian Broadcasting Corporation (IBC)  Five minutes of MFSK32 is at the end of the 30-minute English-language “Shortwave Panorama. For the complete IBC transmission schedule visit  http://ibcradio.webs.com/  

Broad Spectrum Radio is transmitted by WRMI Florida Mondays at 0700-0800 UTC on 5850 and 7730 kHz. MFSK32 is broadcast during the second half hour of the show. Reports to broadspectrumradio@gmail.com.

Thanks for your reception reports! 

Kim

Kim Andrew Elliott, KD9XB
Producer and Presenter
Reporting on international broadcasting at https://twitter.com/kaedotcom


Thursday, September 20, 2018

New schedule of Radio Nikkei on shortwave


Japan
Radio Nikkei 
Effective: After 01 October, 2018

All times UTC

Radio Nikkei will reduce the frequencies after October 2018. The station announced on their homepage at: http://www.radionikkei.jp/news/denpa.html  that they will reduce the frequencies after October 1, , 2018, for the stability and effectiveness of the management. They say the diffusion of internet listening by PCs or portable phones on  http://radioko.jp  is another reason.

The schedule after October 1 is as follows:

Program # 1
2200-1500 6055  (Nagara transmitter site JOZ2 50 kW)
2200-2300 0800-1500 3925 (Nemuro transmitter site JOZ4 10 kW)

Program # 2 on weekdays         
2300-1000 6115 (Nagara JOZ6 50 kW)
1000-1400 3945 (Nagara JOZ5 10 kW) 

Program # 2 on Saturdays and Sundays
2300-0900 6115 (Nagara JOZ6 50 kW) 

9595 kHz (Nagara JOZ3 50kW) will be out of service but will be preserved for emergency use.

9760 kHz (Nagara JOZ7 50 kW) and 3925 kHz (Nagara JOZ 50 kW) will be discontinued.

Transmitters in Nagara site are all NEC HFB-7847, installed in 1980-82 except JOZ5 (NEC HFB-7840D) in 1991.

Transmitter in Nemuro site (JOZ4 3925 kHz) is NEC HFB-7840C installed in 1996.

Takahito Akabayashi
Tokyo, Japan.
(via wb  df5sx, wwdxc BC-DX TopNews July 6, correction July 25)
(Top News 1350)

Tuesday, September 18, 2018

Wantok Radio Light promotes return to shortwave


Papua New Guinea
Acording to an email received today from Wantok Radio Light, they will be on air again on October 6, 2018.

"We have been off for a while but will resume our shortwave broadcast on October 6, 2018. Please tune in on October 6 to pick up Wantok Radio light on 7325kHz. We would appreciate your confirmation on or after October 6, 2018."

Thank you and blessings to you and family.

Billy Yasi
General Manager
Wantok Radio Light

93.9FM in Port Moresby and parts of Central Province 105.9FM rest of the country 7325 kHz on the shortwave band. Station website with streaming audio: http://www.wantok radio.org

Address:
*Papua New Guinea Christian Broadcasting Network, P. O. Box 1273, Port Moresby, National  Capital District, Papua New Guinea.
*Email: wantok@wantokradio.org
(Manuel Méndez, Lugo, Spain/HCDX 18 Sept)

Schedule not included, listed in WRTH 2018 as NBC National bulletins at 0700 and 1900 UTC, on 7325/1kW Port Moresby, and 24 hours on satellite. Wantok Radio Light - PNG Bible Church is affiliated with HCJB/Evangelical Bible Missions through Life Radio Ministries. 
(Teak Publishing)

Monday, September 17, 2018

Dxers Unlimited program, Sunday edition 16 September


Radio Havana Cuba

Dxers Unlimited weekend edition - Sunday 16 September 2018
Arnie Coro CO2KK

Hi amigos radioaficionados now enjoying slightly better shortwave propagation conditions as we approach the autumn equinox.

I am Arnaldo, Arnie, Coro your host here at the weekend edition of Dxers Unlimited your favorite radio hobby program coming to you from sunny La Habana Cuba, and here is now our first news item.

For a change, another broadcast station is going back to use shortwave transmissions, to provide better service to its listeners.

Radio Nepal is now back on short-wave.

Victor Goonetilleke just wrote on the Union of Asian DXers Facebook page on  13 September 2018:

Radio Nepal is back on short-wave after six years off the air on the 60 meters tropical band, by adding 5005 kHz to augment its national transmission grid broadcasting on MW and FM. According to a station official, Radio Nepal resumed short wave broadcasts from 02.00–5.00 p m Nepali time using a 10 kw transmitter at Khumaltar, Lalitpur in Kathmandu.

The same source said the station is using very low power. By all accounts, 5005 kHz is a difficult Dx catch for listeners outside of Nepal. Nepal is 5 hours and 45 minutes ahead of UTC.

  Even though the station is running its old 10kW power at present it can`t be more than a 1 kw or so. However, the greater news is that Nepal is now available on shortwave for Dxers.

Radio amateurs in the states of North and South Carolina continue to provide much needed emergency communications after hurricane Florence impacted the east coast of the United States. This one was a large diameter event, that affected a large area with very heavy rains and storm surges.

The American Radio Relay League sent several portable multi band stations to the area ahead of the arrival of the hurricane, while local radio clubs implemented the emergency plans to provide much needed alternate communications after damages to the cell phone and wired systems required the use of amateur radio stations.

Fixing broken down present day high technology radio equipment is extremely difficult, even when full information is available and the required test instruments can be used. Attempts to repair receivers, transmitters and transceivers using sophisticated solid-state high-density components is next to impossible nowadays, except when very simple problems are causing the failures... One good example is the typical battery contacts corrosion problems that often are the cause of intermittent operation... But once again, attempting to change springs that contact the negative side of batteries and small metal plates used for the positive terminals can prove to be very difficult if you don't have the proper tools and the vitally important instructions on how to disassemble the equipment so that you can access the affected areas.

One vitally important reminder is to never leave batteries inside radios and accessories in storage, and check frequently the batteries for any signs of leaks that can cause permanent corrosion damages to equipment.

Make a check list of all your equipment that uses batteries and once a month open the batteries compartment and be sure that everything is okay. If you have any doubts about possible leaks, discard the batteries immediately and do it in the most ecologically friendly way as possible.

QSL on the air, to the many Radio Havana Cuba listeners that are reporting our 15140 kilohertz frequency that is now starting at eleven AM Cuban time, that is fifteen hours UTC with the full two hours of the Cuba Online magazine show that ends at 18 hours UTC. Then 15140 kilohertz stays on the air with the same central North America 340 degrees azimuth beam with several languages feeds.

The English slot is on from three to four PM local time, that is from 19 to 20 hours UTC.  

Send your reports of the 15140 kilohertz 19 meters band frequency to inforhc @enet.cu and do include your postal mailing address so that we can send you a nice Radio Havana Cuba QSL card.

The best time of the year for AM medium wave Dxing is just around the corner.  Starting around the third week of September and lasting until the end of November the autumn and very early winter AM band Dx season this year should be at least as good as last year's one that started when the number of sunspots went below 20.

Listeners who asked why the autumn DX season for the AM broadcast band is typically better than the spring season, the answer is that during the months of March and early April atmospheric noise levels are higher than during September, and October.

By the way, I am using a recently repaired very old Grundig Yacht Boy 220 Long Wave , Medium Wave, shortwave and FM radio for late evening AM band Dxing with very good results.

Using the built in ferrite rod antenna on the AM Broadcast band during the daytime, I am able to pick up ground wave signals from stations located up to 250 miles away, thanks to the low local noise level prevailing in the neighborhood where I live.

A recent trip for a short vacation at the end of August to beautiful Varadero beach at a seaside location, brought daytime signals from more than 350 miles away coming from Cuban stations located to the east of our main island and operating on the 1200 to 1620 frequency range.

Yes amigos, even an old analog receiver can prove to be an excellent tool for AM medium wave band Dxing, among other highlights because the old radios do not use noisy frequency synthetizers.

This is Radio Havana Cuba, the name of the show is Dxers Unlimited, I am your host Arnie Coro radio amateur CO2KK and now here is ASK ARNIE, the most popular section of this program... just slightly ahead of the HF plus low band VHF propagation updates and forecasts featured whenever possible at the end of the show.

Today I will be answering a question by listener Alberto who listens from Buenos Aires Argentina to our Internet streaming audio. He wants to know why it is not possible for him to pick up our English language programs using his nice shortwave radio and external antenna.

Well amigo Alberto the reason why it is quite difficult to pick our English transmissions via shortwave at your location, is that we use directional antennas to beam the programs to North America, Central America, the Caribbean, and to the Mediterranean area of Europe. The highly directional antenna systems have what is known as a high front to back ratio, so, for example when we use the 6165 kilohertz beam to Central North America, an azimuth of 340 degrees, the reverse of the beam is on 160 degrees, but the passive reflector used on that curtain array cancels the backward lobe so that very little signal is sent in that azimuth.

By the way we do broadcast in Spanish and Portuguese to South America using identical antenna arrays that beam the signals to azimuths of 130, 160 and 172 degrees from Havana to provide full coverage of all of South America.

No need to use high power to enjoy amateur radio, even with simple equipment that do not need the assistance of sophisticate computer software digital communications programs like JT 65 and the most recent widely used FT8.

The unique joy of achieving a successful two way amateur radio contact with a DX station while running very low power, and simple radios is second to none amigos, and by the way here is a partial list of the most popular CW operating frequencies for QRP or very low power amateur stations are 7030 and 7040 on the 40 meters band, 10 dot 106 on the 30 meters band 14060 on 20 meters, 21060 on 15 meters and 28060 on the 10 meters band....Calling CQ using CW on those frequencies will in many instances bring back stations that regularly monitor them for QRP signals.
(Arnie Coro/R Havana Cuba) 

Weekly Propagation Forecast Bulletins


Product: Weekly Highlights and Forecasts
:Issued: 2018 Sep 17 0146 UTC
# Prepared by the US Dept. of Commerce, NOAA, Space Weather Prediction Center
# Product description and SWPC web contact www.swpc.noaa.gov/weekly.html
#
#                Weekly Highlights and Forecasts
#
Highlights of Solar and Geomagnetic Activity 10 - 16 September 2018

Solar activity was very low throughout the period. Region 2722 (S07, Lo=215, class/area Bxo/10 on 11 Sep) produced the strongest flare of the period, a B1 flare at 11/0759 UTC. The region decayed to plage in the following days. No Earth-directed CMEs were observed in available coronagraph imagery.

No proton events were observed at geosynchronous orbit.

The greater than 2 MeV electron flux at geosynchronous orbit ranged from normal background to high levels. High levels were reached on 12-16 Sep and moderate levels were reached on 10-11 Sep. All enhancements in electron flux are associated with the influence of a positive polarity CH HSS.

Geomagnetic field activity ranged from quiet to G2 (Moderate) geomagnetic storm levels. The onset of a CIR ahead of a positive polarity CH HSS on 10 Sep increased geomagnetic activity to G1 levels. As wind speeds increased to around 550 km/s on 11 Sep, geomagnetic activity further increased to G2 (Moderate) geomagnetic storm levels. Total magnetic field strength (Bt) peaked at 15 nT late on 10 Sep. Bt then decreased to near 5-6 nT by mid-day on 11 Sep, which decreased the geomagnetic response to mostly quiet to active levels. One additional period of isolated G1 (Minor) geomagnetic storming was observed early on 14 Sep. Wind speeds persisted at elevated levels through 16 Sep, with a notable increase to a peak around 650 km/s observed early on 15 Sep. As wind speeds are decreased, quiet to unsettled levels on 15 Sep gave way to quiet levels on 16 Sep.

Forecast of Solar and Geomagnetic Activity 17 September - 13 October 2018

Solar activity is expected to be very low throughout the outlook
period.

No proton events are expected at geosynchronous orbit.

The greater than 2 MeV electron flux at geosynchronous orbit is expected to be at moderate levels on 06-08 Oct and at high levels for the remainder of the outlook period. All enhancements in electron flux are expected due to multiple, recurrent CH HSSs.

Geomagnetic field activity is expected to range from quiet to G2 (Moderate) geomagnetic storm levels. G2 (Moderate) geomagnetic storm levels are expected on 08 Oct; G1 (Minor) geomagnetic storm levels are expected on 07 Oct and 10 Oct; active conditions are expected on 17 Sep, 23 Sep, 02 Oct and 11 Oct; unsettled conditions are expected on 18 Sep, 24 Sep, 01 Oct, 09 Oct and 12 Oct. All levels of elevated geomagnetic activity are due to the anticipated influence of multiple, recurrent CH HSSs.

Product: 27-day Space Weather Outlook Table 27DO.txt
:Issued: 2018 Sep 17 0146 UTC
# Prepared by the US Dept. of Commerce, NOAA, Space Weather Prediction Center
# Product description and SWPC web contact www.swpc.noaa.gov/wwire.html
#
#      27-day Space Weather Outlook Table
#                Issued 2018-09-17
#
#   UTC      Radio Flux   Planetary   Largest
#  Date       10.7 cm      A Index    Kp Index
2018 Sep 17      69          16          4
2018 Sep 18      69           8          3
2018 Sep 19      68           5          2
2018 Sep 20      68           5          2
2018 Sep 21      68           5          2
2018 Sep 22      68           5          2
2018 Sep 23      68          16          4
2018 Sep 24      68          12          3
2018 Sep 25      68           5          2
2018 Sep 26      68           5          2
2018 Sep 27      69           5          2
2018 Sep 28      69           5          2
2018 Sep 29      69           5          2
2018 Sep 30      69           5          2
2018 Oct 01      69           8          3
2018 Oct 02      70          10          4
2018 Oct 03      70           5          2
2018 Oct 04      70           5          2
2018 Oct 05      70           5          2
2018 Oct 06      70           5          2
2018 Oct 07      70          20          5
2018 Oct 08      70          30          6
2018 Oct 09      70          10          3
2018 Oct 10      69          18          5
2018 Oct 11      69          15          4
2018 Oct 12      69           8          3
2018 Oct 13      69           5          2
(NOAA)

Friday, September 14, 2018

Murrow Transmitting Station Plans to Broadcast Through Hurricane Florence





“We kind of pride ourselves on pushing through all storms,” program support manager says

Emily M. Reigart

Personnel at the Edward R. Murrow Transmitting Station outside Greenville, N.C., are battening down the hatches ahead of Hurricane Florence’s expected Thursday night impact.

Despite of the threat the storm poses to eastern North Carolina, in a phone interview, Program Support Manager Rick Williford told Radio World their “goal is to maintain 24/7 broadcasts.”

During initial pleasantries, Williford admitted to feeling anxious about the storm and followed up that statement with a colorful explanation.

Additional story at Radio World: https://www.radioworld.com/news-and-business/murrow-transmitting-station-plans-to-broadcast-through-florence

Shortwave Radiogram, 14-17 September


Hello friends,


Sorry about the missing Shortwave Radiogram last Friday at 2030-2100 UTC (Brother Stair was heard on WRMI, instead). That was due to an uploading error on my part.

Videos of last weekend’s Shortwave Radiogram (program 64) have been provided by DFS in Japan and Ralf in Germany (both Saturday 1600 UTC) and by Scott in Ontario (Sunday 2330 UTC). Excerpts of the Saturday 1600 UTC show are presented in videos by DFS in Japan (outdoor reception) and SWLDXBulgaria. Mark in the UK maintains an audio archive. Roger in Germany produced his analysis.

Last weekend, I noticed "positive slope" in many of the decoded images from Space Line in Bulgaria. On the other hand, "negative slope" is often observed with images from WRMI. This may have to do with the sound cards used to play out the Shortwave Radiogram mp3 file at each of these broadcast facilities. 

During the transmission of the first two images of this weekend’s Shortwave Radiogram, observe the vertical lines for slant.  If there is slant, in Fldigi: Configure > Sound Card > Settings > Corrections -- adjust the Rx ppm.

If the lines are slanting to the right as they move downward (negative slope), enter 100 in the space, then make smaller adjustments until the lines become completely vertical.  (It’s faster to type in 100 than to use the up-down arrows.)

If the lines are slanting to the left as they move downward (positive slope), enter -100 in the space, and adjust from there to achieve a completely vertical lines.

Slant with a negative slope looks like this. Use a positive value of ppm Rx correction to make it straight:
   --------
  | \      |
  |  \     |
  |   \    |
  |    \   |
   --------

Slant with a positive slope looks like this. Use a negative value of ppm Rx correction to make it straight:
   --------
  |      / |
  |     /  |
  |    /   |
  |   /    |
   --------

When you have made your adjustment, click Close but not Save, because you might need another adjustment for future broadcasts.

The image of the lines will be transmitted twice.

For more about slant in MFSK images, see this page from the archive of the VOA Radiogram website.

This weekend’s Shortwave Radiogram will be in our usual combination of MFSK32, MFSK128, and MFSK64.

Here is the lineup for Shortwave Radiogram, program 65, in MFSK modes as noted:

  1:43  MFSK32: Program preview
 2:51  MFSK image slant exercise*
 8:25  MFSK128: NASA foldable heat shield*
12:05  MFSK64: China bars Ibsen's "An Enemy of the People"*
15:26  Images of the week*
27:24  MFSK32: Closing announcements

* with image(s)

Please send reception reports to radiogram@verizon.net


Twitter: @SWRadiogram or https://twitter.com/swradiogram (visit especially during the weekend)



Shortwave Radiogram Program 65
(14-17 September 2018)

Friday
2030-2100 UTC
7780 kHz
5950 kHz
MFSK32
MFSK128
MFSK64
WRMI Florida
Saturday
1600-1630 UTC
9400 kHz
Space Line, Bulgaria
Sunday
2330-2400 UTC
7780 kHz
WRMI Florida
Monday
0800-0830 UTC

7730 kHz
5850 kHz
WRMI Florida

Slow Scan Radio transmits SSTV images and text modes Wednesdays at 1830-1900 UTC on 6070 kHz via Channel 292 in Germany. The website is http://www.slowscanradio.com. Reception reports to  x@xdv.me.

The Mighty KBC transmits to Europe Saturdays at 1500-1600 UTC on 9400 kHz (via Bulgaria), with the minute of MFSK at about 1530 UTC (if you are outside of Europe, listen via websdr.ewi.utwente.nl:8901/ ).  And to North America Sundays at 0000-0200 UTC (Saturday 8-10 pm EDT) on the new winter frequency of 5960 kHz, via Germany. The minute of MFSK is at about 0130 UTC.  Reports to Eric: themightykbc@gmail.com . See also http://www.kbcradio.eu/ and https://www.facebook.com/TheMightyKbc/

Italian Broadcasting Corporation (IBC)  Five minutes of MFSK32 is at the end of the 30-minute English-language “Shortwave Panorama. For the complete IBC transmission schedule visit  http://ibcradio.webs.com/  

Broad Spectrum Radio is transmitted by WRMI Florida Mondays at 0700-0800 UTC on 5850 and 7730 kHz. MFSK32 is broadcast during the second half hour of the show. Reports to broadspectrumradio@gmail.com.

To any listeners in the vicinity of Hurricane Florence, may the adverse effects be minimal. After Florence moves inland, it will swing back and bring rain to the northeast USA and maritime Canada Tuesday and Wednesday.

Thanks for your reception reports! 

Kim

Kim Andrew Elliott, KD9XB
Producer and Presenter
Reporting on international broadcasting at https://twitter.com/kaedotcom

Thursday, September 13, 2018

Radio TW 6070 AM, test broadcast


The Channel 292 schedule is now showing a new 'Test' broadcast on 6070 kHz at 1700 UTC on Saturday 15th of September. This station is called 'Radio TW 6070 AM' and I assume from their logo that it will be in the German language.

I've no idea what the format will be, we'll probably have to wait and see.
Alan Gale/BDXC)

Breaking News: Radio Nepal back on shortwave


Victor Goonetilleke just wrote on the Union of Asian DXers Facebook page
13 September 2018

1 hr
BREAKING NEWS

Radio Nepal is back on short-wave after six years by adding 5005 kHz to augment its national transmission grid broadcasting on MW and FM.

According to a station official, Radio Nepal resumed short wave broadcasts from 02.00 – 5.00 p m Nepali time using a 10 kw transmitter at Khumaltar, Lalitpur in Kathmandu . The same source said the station is applying very low power.

By all accounts, 5005 kHz is a difficult DX catch for listeners outside of Nepal. Nepal is 5 hours and 45 minutes ahead of UTC. [ Sarath Weerakoon, 11 Sep 2018 ] 0815-1115 UTC.

Picking up on this both Sarath and I (GVG) started looking for it and here in Sri Lanka on my Perseus SDR there is a faint line and further checking with the IBB/VOA Run Perseus SDR in Delhi, there is even a stronger line which left at 1120 UTC more or less confirming.

Even though the station is running its old 10kW power can't be more than a 1 kw or so.But the greater news is that Nepal is now available on shortwave for DXers and it took UADX to tell the DX community.

Sarath thanks again for your Investigative DX Journalism. This is what UADX is all about.
Mike Terry/BDXC Newsgroup)
(WRTH FB)

Russia Proposes to Use DRM on 65.9-74.0 FM



On the 11th of September 2018, it was reported that the Russian Federation proposes to use the digital DRM+ standard for broadcasting on the  the radio frequency bands 65.9-74 MHz and 87.5-108 MHz.

While this move may not have much of an issue here in Ireland, it has the potential of being a major source of interference to radio amateurs using the 4 metre band (70 MHz) in central and eastern Europe. As 'Secondary Users' of this part of the spectrum, radio amateurs have no choice but to live with any interference, especially during the Summer Sporadic-E season.

The 65.9 MHz to 74 MHz spectrum has been used up to now for analogue FM transmissions in Russia and some adjacent countries. Over the last 20 years, the general trend has been to close these low band VHF transmitters and move them instead to the usual 88 to 108 MHz band. It seemed as if the 65.9 to 74 MHz band might eventually close but this new digital DRM allocation will see it being put to a new use.

This highlights the fact that while extensive parts of the low band VHF spectrum were allocated to the Amateur Radio Service in Ireland, that is very unlikely to happen elsewhere in Europe.

From Google Translate...

Russia introduced new digital broadcasting standards
11.09.2018

MOSCOW, September 11 (Itar-Tass) - RIA Novosti. New digital broadcasting standards are being introduced in the Russian Federation, the radio frequency bands 65.9-74 MHz and 87.5-108 MHz will be allocated for use by digital radio broadcasting means of digital terrestrial broadcasting of the DRM + standard, this will have a significant impact on the development of the broadcasting market in the country, service of the Federal Agency for Press and Mass Communications.

"On September 11, 2018, the Ministry of Digital Development, Communications and Mass Communications of the Russian Federation held a regular meeting of the State Commission on Radio Frequencies, which supported the decision to allocate the radio frequency band 65.9-74 MHz, 87.5-108 MHz for the creation on the territory of Russia networks of digital broadcasting of the standard DRM +, "- said in a statement received by RIA Novosti.

It is noted that the implementation of the DRM + standard significantly increases the efficiency of the use of radio frequency resources. In the frequency band of the DRM + 100 kHz radio channel, up to four stereophonic programs can be transmitted, including additional information. Compared with FM broadcasting, the quality of the perception of sound programs improves due to the possibility of switching to multi-channel stereo.

The standard allows you to enter additional data services, including text, statistical images, the Traffic Message Channel (TMC), and also provides the ability to use the Emergency Warning Function (EWF). With DRM +, the number of radio channels is almost doubled, and the operating costs and payback periods of new equipment are reduced by reducing the required transmitter power and the available capability of their operation in a single-frequency network, which leads to additional energy savings. The introduction of the new standard does not require changing the frequency planning adopted in the Russian Federation and allows integration into the global information system without additional costs.

"This is an uneasy but fundamental decision that will have a significant impact on the development of the broadcasting market in our country." In Europe, the digital broadcasting standard has been actively implemented for a long time. "Norway, Switzerland, Austria, Germany, Italy, Denmark, Belgium and Latvia several years ago began a stage-by-stage refusal of analogue broadcasting in favor of digital, "said Mikhail Seslavinsky, head of the Federal Agency for Press and Mass Communications, after the meeting, his words are quoted by the press service of Rospechat.

It is noted that before recommending a standard for use in Russia, FSUE RTRS jointly with the St. Petersburg State University of Telecommunications. prof. M.A. Bonch-Bruevich conducted research work, during which the claimed in the standard characteristics of the DRM + system were confirmed, field tests were conducted in the modes of fixed mobile reception of the DRM + signal in the radio frequency bands 65.9-74 MHz, 87.5-108 MHz, service areas were estimated with the transmitter power selected, laboratory studies of the required radio frequency protection ratios at the receiver input were made.

Source: https://ria.ru/amp/society/20180911/1528303185.html
(EI7GL blog/https://ei7gl.blogspot.com/2018/09/russia-proposes-to-use-drm-on-659-740.html 

Wednesday, September 12, 2018

Dxers Unlimited mid-week edition, September 11

By Arnie Coro


Hola amigos… more reasons for the very poor propagation conditions on the MF and HF bands.

Geomagnetic conditions have reached moderate storm levels on a planetary level (NOAA Kp 6 for the 6-9UT period today, 11 September 2018). The storm is due to the enhanced solar wind parameters associated with a coronal hole high speed stream, while the solar wind speed gradually increased from 370 km/s at noon 10 September to values near 610 km/s at 10UT today.

DXCC COUNTRY/ENTITY REPORT
According to the AR-Cluster Network for the week of Sunday, September 2-9,  they were 206 DX countries or entities on the air on the monitored amateur bands.

I am Arnaldo, Arnie, Coro your host here at the middle of the week edition of Dxers Unlimited. Now our next news item...

A number of hand-held FM transceivers capable of transmitting on frequencies beyond the 2 meters and 70 centimeters band are being banned by several frequency management authorities around the world. The usually very low-cost dual band FM handie talkies are considered a menace because they can easily be reprogrammed to operate on the public services frequencies. Banning those radios is achieved by placing them in black lists kept by Customs on the countries were they are no longer allowed to be imported.

QSL on the air to Dxers Unlimited's. Listeners that have asked to keep the HF bands propagation updates at the end of the show on every program. Don't worry, from now on whenever possible Arnie Coro's HF plus low band, HF propagation update will be on the air at the end of the show.

Next News Item: Sponsored by the International Telecommunications Union, ITU, the specialized oldest United Nations agency, a worldwide research project that is measuring the radio frequency spectrum noise levels will provide valuable information about this severe problem that has a negative impact on the use of radio telecommunications systems that are vital in today's world.

By the way some of the worst radio broadband noise levels measured at several megalopolis, like Mexico City, New York, London, Shanghai, Tokio, Moscow and Paris are showing that the AM broadcast band services are becoming useless at the present transmitting stations power levels. The actual effective service area originally planned for many AM broadcast stations since 1959 have proven to be practically useless due to the poor signal to noise ratios prevailing on the 530 to 1700 kHz frequency range.

Hurricane Florence now is in an almost fixed track, and is going to impact the US East Coast as a category 4 or even category 5 storm. The most powerful storm to reach that part of the continental United States, in more than 60 years.

Amateur radio operators located in the affected areas as well as others around the first skip HF coverage area are already deploying their emergency communications stations. 

It is expected that the record-breaking winds will produce considerable damage to the telecommunications and broadcasting facilities. As it happened last year in Texas, the cellphones networks went down before the full blast of hurricane Harvey had hit the area, making the use of amateur radio emergency systems essential for responding to live saving operations requiring air evacuations from flooded isolated areas.

Number 94 is here. Yes amigos, the number 94 way of enjoying our spare time by means of our radio and television hobby is here: It is known as amateur digital television, capable of high definition transmissions.

For delivery of television signals, there are several methods in use that include: cable (C), satellite (S), terrestrial (T), internet streaming (www), DVD, etc.


Each delivery system has its own advantages and disadvantages. As a result, different digital encoding mechanisms are used for each method. The cable, satellite and terrestrial all use RF carriers, while satellite and terrestrial are truly over the air rf paths. As radio amateurs, we use over the air rf transmission paths.

In the early days of DTV (early 2000s), some DTV hams were experimenting with using satellite TV equipment, mainly due to the low cost (? $25) of free-to-air (FTA) satellite, L-band (1-2GHz) receivers. Their work was primarily on the 23cm (1.2GHz) band.

Other early adopter, DTV hams experimented using cable TV equipment for the same lowcost reasons. The normal amateur radio environment is really the over the air, terrestrial, rf transmission with radio waves being transmitted horizontally over the surface of the earth.

The major issues encountered with such radio waves is the presence of multi-path, RFI and weak signals. Multi-path refers to multiple rf signals bouncing off of various reflectors, such as hills, buildings, etc. and arriving at the receiving antenna with various time delays. In the days of analog TV, this was readily evidenced by the presence of "ghost" signals on the TV screen.

DTV transmission in a cable TV environment is rf transmission in an almost  perfect environment. It is almost a perfect, echo free environment due to the efforts made to maintain very low VSWR in the cable TV system.   Signal strengths can also be kept up to relatively high levels. Thus, the digital modulation method for cable TV does not need to make many corrections for its good environment.

DTV transmission from broadcast TV satellites, is again in a relatively clean  rf environment. Because of the high gain and directivity of the receive antennas, there is essentially no multi-path to contend with from satellites. The main issue for satellite rf signals is very low signal strength at the receive antennas. Terrestrial rf transmission is the worst possible rf environment. It must deal with multi-path, RFI, and weak signals and still deliver a perfect DTV picture.

Here in Cuba our national television uses the highly efficient DTMB'T that has proven to be more reliable than the ATSC systems variants used in the USA. So far, Cuban radio amateurs have used analog television transmissions using several slow scan TV modes that proved to be very effective sending still photos of hurricane affected areas to the Civil Defense command posts using both 2 meters FM and HF single side band transmissions.

This is Radio Havana Cuba, the name of the show is Dxers Unlimited. I am your host Arnaldo, Arnie Coro and here is our next radio hobby related item for today...it is about the really amazing results achieved by minimalist amateur radio stations, using minimum parts counts receivers and transmitters.

Starting with a dual triode tubes in a glass envelope the regenerative receiver was designed to work on the 40 meters amateur band, using high impedance headphones.

The first triode is the detector and the second one works as an audio amplifier. The radio tunes from 7000 to 7150 kHz only. It has good sensitivity and uses very common electronic parts that you can find by recycling equipment. It uses a low voltage power supply that is also easy to build.

The transmitter first option uses quartz crystal control and a single power tetrode or pentode vacuum tube, that when fed from a voltage doubler power supply will easily provide between two and five watts into the simple half wave coaxial fed dipole antenna.

When a local amateur that is a QRP low power radios enthusiast saw the minimalist station he said and I agreed with him that it a simplified version of the famous World War II Paraset !!! He took the circuit diagrams and photos to duplicate the set.

And now at the end of the show.... Arnie Coro's HF propagation update.... Zero sunspots ... a blank solar disc with very low solar activity ...AND A GEOMAGNETIC STORM IN PROGRESS: As predicted, a moderately strong G2-class geomagnetic storm was underway on Sept. 11th as a stream of high-speed solar wind buffets Earth's magnetic field. This morning in Alaska, "amazing auroras covered all of the sky," reports Ayumi Bakken from just outside Fairbanks:

Send your signal reports and comments about this program to inforhc@enet.cu or postal mail to: Arnie Coro , Radio Havana Cuba, Havana, Cuba.
(Arnie Coro/R Havana Cuba)