Saturday, October 19, 2019

From the Isle of Music & Uncle Bill's Melting Pot schedules, October 20-November 2



From the Isle of Music, October 20-26 and October 27-November 2:

October 20-26: We feature the rather unique music of singer/composer Francis del Rio.
October 27-November 2: Our special guest is Emilio Vega, whose album Todos los Caminos won the Instrumental Vocal category of Cubadisco 2019.

The broadcasts take place:
For Eastern Europe but audible well beyond the target area in most of the Eastern Hemisphere (including parts of East Asia and Oceania) with 100Kw, Sunday 1500-1600 UTC on SpaceLine, 9400 kHz, from Sofia, Bulgaria (1800-1900 MSK). If you don’t have a shortwave radio or are out of range, you can listen live to an uplink from a listening radio in the Netherlands during the broadcast at
http://websdr.ewi.utwente.nl:8901/?tune=9400am

For the Americas and parts of Europe, Tuesday 0000-0100 UTC (New UTC) on WBCQ, 7490 KHz from Monticello, ME, USA (Monday 8-9PM EST in the US).

For Europe and sometimes beyond, Tuesday 1900-2000 UTC and Saturday 1200-1300 UTC on Channel 292, 6070 KHz from Rohrbach, Germany. If you don’t have a shortwave radio or are out of range, you can listen live to an uplink from a listening radio in the Netherlands during the broadcast at http://websdr.ewi.utwente.nl:8901/?tune=6070am
Visit our Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/fromtheisleofmusic/

Uncle Bill’s Melting Pot, October 20, 22, 27 and 29:
October 20 and 22: Episode 135 presents music from Reunión, a department of France in the Indian Ocean with a fascinating mix of musical influences.
October 27 and 29: Episode 136 presents Kurdish music.

The transmissions take place: Sundays 2200-2230 UTC (6:00PM -6:30PM Eastern US) on WBCQ The Planet 7490 KHz from the US to the Americas and parts of Europe 

Tuesdays 2000-2030 UTC on Channel 292, 6070 KHz from Rohrbach, Germany for Europe.
If you don’t have a shortwave radio or are out of range, you can listen live to an uplink from a listening radio in the Netherlands during the broadcast at http://websdr.ewi.utwente.nl:8901/?tune=6070am
Visit our Facebook Page at https://www.facebook.com/UncleBillsMeltingPot/

William "Bill" Tilford, Owner/Producer
Tilford Productions, LLC

Friday, October 18, 2019

Shortwave Radiogram weekend schedule


Hello friends,

In addition to the video provided most weeks by Scott in Ontario (Friday 1300 UTC) , videos of program 121 were also produced by MDK2 in Colorado (1525 UTC DRM excerpt) and Jeff W5IJH in Oklahoma (Sunday 2330 UTC, field decoding using a Raspberry Pi 3). The audio archive is maintained by Mark in the UK. Analysis is prepared by Roger in Germany.

This weekend's show is in the usual MFSK32 and MFSK64, with eight images.

Here is the lineup for Shortwave Radiogram, program 122,  17-20 October 2019, in MFSK modes as noted:

 1:40  MFSK32: Program preview
 2:45  New NASA satellite will study the ionosphere
 7:52  MFSK64: North vs South Korea soccer in empty stadium*
14:06  This week's images*
27:25  MFSK32: Closing announcements

* with image(s)

Please send reception reports to radiogram@verizon.net

And visit http://swradiogram.net

Twitter: @SWRadiogram or https://twitter.com/swradiogram (visit during the weekend to see listeners' results)

Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/567099476753304

RTÉ to return to service




Chairsperson of the  Oireachtas Communications Committee Hildegarde Naughton has welcomed confirmation from RTÉ that the longwave radio service will return tomorrow.

RTÉ announced plans to end its longwave radio service in 2014 which sparked criticism from groups who said the move would isolate elderly people, particularly those in Britain, who rely on it to keep up to date with Irish news and current affairs.

A group in Manchester signed a petition calling for it to be saved so Irish expats could continue to receive the service abroad, with some saying “having a voice from home” helped solve loneliness.

Cancelling the service would have seen some older radio sets unable to pick up RTÉ Radio 1, with RTÉ’s director general Dee Forbes at the time saying it made the decision in keeping with “evolving technologies”.

Representations were then made to the Oireachtas communications committee on behalf of the Irish diaspora in Britain, and chair of that committee, Fine Gael TD Hildegarde Naughton confirmed last month that works had begun to ensure the broadcast continues for at least another two years.
The service has been unavailable since 7 September this year as RTÉ undertook “significant remedial work” on transmission equipment to ensure the continuance of the service for at least another two years.

The longwave service is now turn to return October 18
“RTÉ committed earlier this year to maintaining the service following engagement with the Committee,” Naughton said.
“Following the temporary suspension of the service, to allow the works to be carried out, I am pleased that the service has resumed and listeners in the UK and beyond cna be assured that service will continue for a minimum of two years,” she said.
“We will continue to work with RTÉ to ensure longwave has a viable future.”
RTÉ has been contacted for comment.

https://www.thejournal.ie/rte-longwave-radio-returning-4855598-Oct2019/

Radio Caroline North slated for weekend broadcast



The Boat That Rocks ... will be rocking this weekend as we bring you another fabulous RADIO CAROLINE NORTH broadcast, LIVE from our historic radio-ship Ross Revenge on the River Blackwater.
 
Live from the River Blackwater
We've got a great schedule of presenters lined up - JOHHNY LEWIS, NICK JACKSON, DAVE FOSTER, JERRY WRIGHT, PETER PHILIPS and STEVE ANTHONY - and they can't wait to bring you all the best music from the 60s, 70s and 80s, plus a few 90s classics too.

Our broadcast sponsor this month is The Vintage TV & Wireless Company, Norwich - and you can win money to spend in our web shop, thanks to our competition sponsor Compare Trade Finance.com of Wivenhoe.

Join us on Saturday 19th and Sunday 20th October on 648 AM in the South and South-East, on 1368 AM via Manx Radio in the North and North-West, online here, on your mobile, on smart speakers … we're everywhere!

We would love to hear from you – send your emails direct to the Ross studios at memories@radiocaroline.co.uk during the broadcast.
http://radiocaroline.co.uk/#home.html

Monday, October 14, 2019

Greenland - The Early Wireless Scene

Greenland Coastal Radio (coastalradio.org.uk)
During its long history, the United States has expanded its territories on several occasions by buying land from other countries. In 1803, they bought the territory in mainland North America that came to be known as the Louisiana Purchase from France. In 1867, they bought Alaska from Russia, and during World War 1 in 1917, they concluded the purchase of the islands of St. Thomas, St John and St Croix from neutral Denmark to form the U. S. Virgin Islands in the Caribbean.  So, why not make a similar endeavor for Greenland? 

In 1868, a document was prepared on behalf of the State Department in the United States regarding the suggested purchase of Greenland, but Congress demonstrated no interest. Then in 1946, the United States offered Denmark $100 million for Greenland, but Denmark had no interest. Then as recently as  2001, the influential twice-monthly publication, National Review, suggested that the United States should again offer to buy Greenland from Denmark. And now, the recent kerfuffle over the same suggestion once again.

The island of Greenland is the largest island in the world, though one distinguished geographer states that Greenland is actually three separate islands that are closely related geographically. The total land mass extends 1,700 miles north and south, and 650 miles east and west at its widest point. Most of Greenland is covered with what is called the Greenland Ice Sheet; that is ice, snow and slowly moving glaciers. If all of this congregated ice were to melt, the global sea level would rise, it is calculated, by 24 feet.

The earliest settlers in Greenland were the Eskimo-Inuit people who began to arrive from Siberia via Alaska and Canada around 2500 BC. The famous Viking traveler and explorer Eric the Red arrived from Iceland with a contingent of settlers on 14 longships in the year 986, though ultimately their three main settlements at the southern end of Greenland died out, maybe around 500 years later. 

The modern era of exploration in Greenland began in 1721 with the arrival of merchants and missionaries from Denmark; and since then there have been anywhere up to a hundred varied explorations of Greenland by parties from Europe, the Americas and Asia. For example, the exploration ship Effie M. Morrissey alone made nearly a score of exploratory visits to Greenland during the 20 year era beginning in 1926.

As would be expected, the first usage of wireless and radio in Greenland was associated with exploration, and the ship that carried this particular exploration party was the Bowdoin. On April 9, 1921, the 88 ft long schooner Bowdoin was launched from the Hodgdon shipyards at East Boothbay in Maine in the United States. 

This heavily reinforced wooden ship was designed for frigid northern exploration by Arctic explorer Captain Donald B. MacMillan and it had a steel nose for ramming icebergs at sea. Though the Bowdoin was equipped with sails, yet it was also loaded with a marine engine, and an oversize rudder to enable the ship to make quick turns.

In July (1921), MacMillan set out for his first exploration trip into the Arctic in his brand new ship, the SS Bowdoin, named in honor of the college in Brunswick Maine where he had previously obtained his graduate education. This voyage took them to Baffin Island, the large Canadian island that lies next to Greenland. 

However, that preliminary expedition took them along the western edge of Baffin Island; that is, between the Canadian mainland and Baffin Island, and not between Baffin Island and Greenland itself. On that occasion, preliminary wireless equipment had been installed on the ship, though they had no success in their longwave transmissions. The subsequent report from the expedition stated that the main problem was electrical interference up in the auroral zone. So, the world’s first wireless experiments at the top of the world in the Arctic met with a dismal failure.   

The next MacMillan expedition to the Arctic, and to Greenland in particular, set out from Wiscasset Maine aboard this same Bowdoin in June 1923, with wireless equipment made available by Zenith Radio in Chicago. The callsign WNP was conveniently utilized to mean rather appropriately Wireless North Pole.

The transmitter was a 500 watt unit operating in Morse Code on 1365 kHz, and the Wireless Operator was Donald Mix W9AT from Bristol Connecticut. The first choice as Wireless Operator for this Greenland expedition fell to the famous No 1 amateur radio operator in the United States Don Wallace 6AM, but he was unable to accept because his son Billy was still an infant.

The antenna system on the Bowdoin was a 4 wire flat top 52 feet long.  Each week, Donald Mix sent a 500 word newspaper report to the United States in a specially designed secret code. This 1923 usage of radio was the first successful radio transmission from the Arctic. 

Every Thursday evening at midnight, the Zenith mediumwave broadcasting station WJAZ at the  Edgewater Beach Hotel in Chicago transmitted a summarized news bulletin for the benefit of the men aboard the good ship Bowdoin. Some say that this Chicago radio station WJAZ was launched specially for communication with the MacMillan exploration party in Greenland. 

However, the once a week midnight broadcasts from Chicago were on the air under a special experimental callsign 9XN, not the broadcast callsign WJAZ. (A similar callsign, 9ZN, was the amateur callsign of Eugene McDonald, one of the early founders of Zenith Radio, though it was also used at times in Zenith communications.)

There were two ships in the 1925 MacMillan Expedition to Greenland, once again the auxiliary Schooner Bowdoin with the call WNP, and a former Canadian minesweeper, the cargo holder SS Peary with the callsign WAP. The letter P in the three letter callsign WAP, does seem to have reference to the ship Peary. The Zenith transmitter aboard the Peary was a 1 kW unit, which was noted in the United States in the 8 MHz range.

The callsign for the Bowdoin in 1931 was a regular four letter callsign WDDE; and in February 1938, the Bowdoin was noted with a radio broadcast to the United States on 4800 kHz.  QSL cards were regularly issued for the radio transmissions from the several MacMillan expeditions to Greenland.

More about radio transmissions from subsequent expeditions to Greenland next time.
(Adrian Peterson/AWR-Wavescan-NWS 554)

Product Announcement: DXtreme Monitor Log 12™


Product Announcement
DXtreme Monitor Log 12™

DXtreme Software™ has released a new version of its popular logging program for radio monitoring enthusiasts - DXtreme Monitor Log 12 - which lets listeners and DXers log the stations they’ve heard using features that enhance their monitoring experiences.

User’s Choice of Country Formats
When starting Monitor Log 12 the first time as a new user - or when creating a new secondary database - users can select the country format they want to use: NASWA Countries or ARRL Entities. Country information is fully editable when changes occur.

Finding Broadcast Stations to Monitor
The Schedule Checker lets users import schedules from Aoki, EiBi, and FCC AM web sites and display schedule data according to the filter criteria they specify. A list box lets users switch between schedule types. And users can filter schedule information by band, frequency, station, country, time of day, language, and more.

When the What’s On Now? function is activated, the schedule refreshes automatically at the top of each hour for Aoki and EiBi schedules.

For each schedule item, Schedule Checker queries the Monitor Log 12 database to let users know – through user-defined, foreground and background display colors – whether they need to monitor a station for a brand-new or verified country. Schedule Checker also displays bearing and distance, runs optional Afreet Ham CAP propagation predictions, draws optional Afreet DX Atlas azimuth plots, tunes supported radios to schedule frequencies when users double-click schedule items, and starts log entries for scheduled stations monitored.

Finding Amateur Radio Stations to Monitor
Monitor Log 12 integrates with optional Afreet Band Master to let users see, on its graphical interface, where hams are operating. Monitor Log 12 supplies Band Master with an Entity Needed List based on the user’s Monitor Log database, making it possible for Band Master to indicate the stations whose entities (countries) users need to monitor.

Finding Utility Stations to Monitor
A Links menu provides convenient access to user-specified blogs and web sites that can inform users as to where utility and other stations may be operating.

Logging Stations
Monitor Log 12 lets users log all kinds of stations - radio, television, broadcast, Amateur Radio, utility, military, and more! And it lets users log stations across the radio spectrum - from long wave, to medium wave, to short wave, and beyond. Users can also select the display of kHz or MHz frequencies.

The Last Log Entries Grid on the Monitor Log window shows up to 5000 of the most recent log entries added. Its records can be sorted, and double-clicking records displays detailed data on the Monitor Log window. Users can resize the grid columns and scroll horizontally to columns that do not appear initially. Users can also display a larger, resizable Last Log Entries window. A Properties window lets users change the order of columns, the number of log entries to display, and the font and color attributes of grids and other program components, such as: Content Tabs for describing the content monitored, Script Editor for creating and editing scripts, Direct Tune interface for tuning radios, and Comments for typing ad hoc comments.

Reporting Reception
Users can create customized paper and e-mail reception reports for sending to stations plus club report entries for reporting catches to clubs and magazines.

When users add or display a log entry, Monitor Log 12 prepares a post announcing their DX catch and displays it on the Social Media Post tab. From there, users can drag the post to their favorite social media web sites to share their catch with others.

Using the Script Editor window, users can create and edit scripts that format reception reports, eReports, and social media posts to their liking. The software prompts users to select the script they want to use. Dozens of scripts come with Monitor Log 12.

Users can also print SWL and Address labels on industry-standard label stock, and send eQSL requests to hams automatically via the popular https://www.eqsl.cc site.

Imaging
Improv Imaging lets users associate ad hoc images with log entries using Capture, Scan, and Clipboard functions. Captures of stations received on digital applications, waterfall displays, facsimile and Amateur TV pictures are popular. The Improv Imaging tab and Application let users view images anytime, and an Improv Image Explorer lets them peruse their entire collection and display associated log entries. A QSL Imaging facility functions the same as Improv Imaging for associating QSLs.

Other Features
Rig Control - Retrieves the frequency and mode from supported radios and permits tuning from the Schedule Checker and Direct Tune interface. Rig control is provided through integration with Afreet Omni-Rig and SDR applications like HDSDR, SDR Console, and SDRuno.
Audio Archiving - Lets users maintain an audio archive of stations heard.
Reporting and Searching - Produces Performance, Stations, and Log Entry reports that track the performance and progress of the user’s monitoring station in its entirety. The software lets users tailor the appearance of reports plus FTP them to user-provided Web space for remote access and sharing. Reports can integrate with Afreet DX Atlas to create pin maps. Searches allow access to all monitoring data in a variety of formats.

ADIF Import - Lets users import ADIF-formatted log entries into their database.
eQSL.cc Inbox Update - Updates user’s database with eQSL.cc Inbox verifications.
Documentation - Context-sensitive Procedural Help, Field Help, and Microhelp are accessible per window to provide instructions quickly. A web-based Information Center is accessible from the Help menu for late-breaking assistance, and Installation Instructions and a Getting Started Guide are delivered in PDF format with the software.

Operating Systems, Pricing, Contact Information
DXtreme Monitor Log 12 runs in 32- and 64-bit versions of Microsoft® Windows® 10, 8.1, 8, 7, Vista®, and XP. It retails for $94.99 USD worldwide for electronic distribution. Pricing for CD versions and upgrading users is available on our Web site.

All prices include product support by Internet e-mail. For more information, visit https://www.dxtreme.com or contact Bob Raymond at bobraymond@dxtreme.com.

Weekly Propagation Forecast Bulletins


Product: Weekly Highlights and Forecasts
:Issued: 2019 Oct 14 0407 UTC
# Prepared by the US Dept. of Commerce, NOAA, Space Weather Prediction Center
# Product description and SWPC web contact: www.swpc.noaa.gov/content/subscription-services
#
#                Weekly Highlights and Forecasts
#
Highlights of Solar and Geomagnetic Activity 07 - 13 October 2019

Solar activity was very low. The solar disk was spotless. No Earth-directed coronal mass ejections (CMEs) were observed.

No proton events were observed at geosynchronous orbit.

The greater than 2 MeV electron flux at geosynchronous orbit was at moderate levels on 08-13 Oct and at high levels on 07 Oct. The maximum flux of the period was 1,930 pfu observed at 07/1745 UTC.

Geomagnetic field activity ranged from quiet to active levels. The period started off at nominal levels with solar wind speeds in the 350-405 km/s range. by 09 Oct, total field increased to 11 nT at 09/2135 UTC followed by an increase in solar wind speed to approximately 490 km/s as a weak negative polarity coronal hole high speed stream (CH HSS) moved into geoeffective positon. Solar wind speed remained enhanced through late on 11 Oct. The geomagnetic field responded with quiet to active conditions on 09-10 Oct and quiet to unsettled levels on 11 Oct.

Forecast of Solar and Geomagnetic Activity 14 October - 09 November 2019

Solar activity is expected to continue at very low levels.

No proton events are expected at geosynchronous orbit.

The greater than 2 MeV electron flux at geosynchronous orbit is expected to reach moderate levels on 16 and 24 Oct and again on 04-09 Nov. High levels are expected on 14-15 Oct and on 25 Oct-03 Nov due to recurrent CH HSS influence.

Geomagnetic field activity is expected to reach unsettled levels on 14-15 Oct due to possible weak CH HSS effects. Unsettled to active levels are expected on 21 Oct and 24-28 with G1 (Minor) geomagnetic storm levels likely on 24-25 Oct due to recurrent CH HSS effects.

Product: 27-day Space Weather Outlook Table 27DO.txt
:Issued: 2019 Oct 14 0407 UTC
# Prepared by the US Dept. of Commerce, NOAA, Space Weather Prediction Center
# Product description and SWPC web contact www.swpc.noaa.gov/content/subscription-services
#
#      27-day Space Weather Outlook Table
#                Issued 2019-10-14
#
#   UTC      Radio Flux   Planetary   Largest
#  Date       10.7 cm      A Index    Kp Index
2019 Oct 14      68           8          3
2019 Oct 15      68           8          3
2019 Oct 16      68           5          2
2019 Oct 17      68           5          2
2019 Oct 18      68           5          2
2019 Oct 19      68           5          2
2019 Oct 20      68           5          2
2019 Oct 21      68          15          4
2019 Oct 22      68           5          2
2019 Oct 23      68           5          2
2019 Oct 24      68          18          5
2019 Oct 25      68          25          5
2019 Oct 26      68          12          4
2019 Oct 27      68          10          3
2019 Oct 28      68           8          3
2019 Oct 29      68           5          2
2019 Oct 30      68           5          2
2019 Oct 31      68           5          2
2019 Nov 01      68           5          2
2019 Nov 02      68           5          2
2019 Nov 03      68           5          2
2019 Nov 04      68           5          2
2019 Nov 05      68           5          2
2019 Nov 06      68           5          2
2019 Nov 07      68           5          2
2019 Nov 08      68           5          2
2019 Nov 09      68           5          2

Radio Communications Dashboard
https://www.swpc.noaa.gov/communities/radio-communications
(NOAA)

Saturday, October 12, 2019

Solving the Medium-Wave Problem

Is it still worth maintaining AM?

RUXANDRA OBREJA

The author is chairman of Digital Radio Mondiale.

Is medium wave in decline? Some people think so.

In the 1950s radio was declared mortally wounded by TV. But then FM with its new music rescued it, becoming one of the most successful technologies and platforms ever. Radio survived and thrived but AM should have died at the hands of the nimbler, younger and more attractive FM.

Additional story at Radio World: https://tinyurl.com/yygbc8rq

SM Radio Desau plans Sunday broadcast

The German broadcaster SM Radio Dessau will be operating at 100kW on 6070 kHz from 1000 to 1100 UTC on Sunday 13th of October according to the schedule on the Channel 292 website.

You can find full details about the station on their website at:
https://www.smradio-dessau.de/
(BDXC)

Atlantic Radio plans October 13 broadcast




Sunday October 13 (repeat)
19:00 to 20:00 UTC on 6070 kHz via Channel 292 and online
20:00 to 21:00 UTC online

Stream addresses
http://radioatlantic2000.free.fr

(or)
64 kbps
http://109.169.23.243:35327
Listen2myradio.com - Get your own FREE online radio!

 24 kbps
http://109.169.23.22:36855
http://atlantic2000.radiostream321.com/

Only detailed reception reports will be confirmed by eQSL.
Reports to: atlantic2000international@gmail.com

Building a Hobby Radio Station with Lego



Back in July, we presented a story here in Wavescan about a teenager in Iceland who built a large scale model of the famous though tragic passenger liner, the RMS Titanic with the use 56,000 Lego bricks. We go now to another story, this time about the planned usage of Lego bricks for the construction of a projected model radio station with the very appropriate callsign WLGO.

The August 14 (2019) issue of the American trade journal, Radio World, presents a feature article under the title, What Do You get When You Combine Legos and Radio? which was written by frequent contributor Dan Slentz. An internet search produced some very interesting additional information. 

This is the story...

Matthew Maneely serves as the Operations Manager with the Gospel music station WICY (1490 kHz AM and 102.7 MHz FM) in Malone New York.  As a kid, he grew up with the popular building toys of that era, Lincoln Logs and Erector Sets. In addition, his grandfather and other family members were actively involved in the radio scene during that era.  His own children are into model building with the now familiar Lego bricks.

Every year, Lego produces 19 billion individual pieces, and over the years it has launched somewhere around 12,000 specialized kit sets, yet there is no kit set for the construction of a Lego radio station.  Matt Maneely decided to challenge Lego to produce a radio station kit set, as an encouragement for children to later consider a career in radio.

As the first step in this procedure, Matt Maneely designed his own model radio station using the Lego Digital Designer Software and he submitted the design to Lego in Denmark. Lego replied by stating that if 10,000 people would respond, then they would produce the pieces for a model radio station.  The needed worldwide impetus is still underway.

The radio station callsign that Matt Maneely gives to his computer designed Lego radio station is appropriately WLGO. Although there is currently no licensed radio broadcasting station on the air in the United States under the callsign WLGO, at one stage, there was. 

Back in the year 1983, radio station WXAX was launched in Lexington South Carolina on 1170 kHz, with 10 kW by day and 2½ kW by night.  The format was country music. Five years later, the callsign was changed to WLGO and the format was changed to adult contemporary, though a few years later again, a new Christian religious format was introduced. In 2005 the station was sold to Spanish interests who changed the callsign to WQVA.  Then give five more years and the call was changed again, this time to WDEK with an oldies format.

Thus, Matt Meneely’s Lego callsign WLGO was in use as the FCC approved callsign for the 1170 kHz mediumwave station in Lexington, South Carolina for a period of some 17 years, with at first an adult contemporary format and then a religious format.
(Adrian Peterson-AWR Wavescan-NWS 553)

Small Country, Two Large Radio Stations: Sud Radio




That small country was Andorra in the Pyrenees Mountains between France and Spain, and the two large radio stations were Radio Andorra and Sud Radio. On this occasion here in Wavescan, we examine the long, convoluted and interesting history of the large radio station in Andorra that was known best under its third title, Sud Radio. 

During the more than 40 year history of the original Radio Andorra, six different transmitters have been used for program broadcasting.  Likewise for Sud Radio; during its quarter century history, a total of four transmitters were used.  A summary of these two sets of commercial radio broadcasting transmitters shows:-
Radio Andorra  MW 3 60 kW 160 kW & 300 kW
Shortwave 3 3½ & 10 & 25 kW
Sud Radio MW 3 100 kW & 300 kW & 600 kW
Shortwave 1 kW

Both stations, Radio Andorra and Sud Radio, were large scale commercial operations with huge audiences in France and Spain and beyond, as well as in Andorra itself, though neither station was a financial success. Generally speaking, Radio Andorra was Spanish oriented, and Sud Radio was French oriented. There was strong competition between the two stations, for listeners as well as for advertisers, though there were a few occasions when a touch of co-operation might have been advantageous to them both.

Actually, Sud Radio in Andorra began as an organization in 1951 under the legal name Andorradio, though this title was very confusing due to the similarity in name with the already established, 12 year old Radio Andorra.  The new Andorradio/Sud Radio was established in Andorra in an attempt to circumvent radio regulations in France itself, which back then prohibited the operation of commercial and private radio stations. 

As such its main competitors were Radio Monte Carlo, Radio Luxembourg, and Europe No. 1 from the Saarland in Germany. Radio Monte Carlo of course had a strong signal on 205 metres (1463 kHz) mediumwave but all three stations operated very high powered transmitters on longwave which pretty much blanketed the country.  Androrradio/Sud Radio was therefore very much the weakest of the four French competitors.

Within the first four years of its operation in Andorra, the offices and studios for the new Sud Radio were located in three consecutive though nearby locations, each on Galeries Merritxell (Merritxell Avenue) in Encamp. Interestingly, each of these three locations was also quite close to the two operational buildings in use by the original Radio Andorra. 

The first of the three consecutive studio/office locations for Sud Radio was listed simply as Encamp; the second location was in Casa Filipo; and the third was at 7 Avenida Merritxell. At that stage, their postal address was interestingly Post Office Box 7, Andorra la Vella.

Preliminary test broadcasts from Andorradio/Sud Radio were noted in 1954, though the station was not officially inaugurated until four years later, on September 18, 1958. Two transmitters were on the air at that stage; a 100 kW Thomson transmitter on mediumwave 1485 kHz, and a 1 kW on a shortwave channel apparently somewhere around 6 MHz.  There were lengthy occasions when the shortwave transmitter was listed as silent.

The initial location for both transmitters for Sud Radio, mediumwave and shortwave, was adjacent to the studio locations in the valley at Encamp which was almost completely surrounded by high mountains. Mediumwave signals were radiated from a single mast supported by cables, and shortwave signals were radiated from another though quite simple antenna system. Propagation results from this mountain enclosed location (as would in reality be expected) were described as “disastrous.” That original transmitter location on Merritxell Avenue in Encamp was on the air for approximately 7 years, from 1958 to 1964.

One year later (1959), the 100 kW transmitter was operating on 818 kHz, and the 1 kW experimental shortwave transmitter was operating, officially, on 3145 kHz only. However, the shortwave signal was also noted in Europe also on 6305 kHz, which was initially denied by station staff, though the 6 MHz channel was indeed subsequently acknowledged. 

It may be that the Andorradio frequency of 6305 kHz was simply the first harmonic of a slightly mis-tuned fundamental frequency of 3145 kHz.  Mathematically, 3145 kHz x 2 = 6290 kHz, just 15 kHz lower than where they were actually heard. On March 29, 1961, the Andorra government signed legislation that approved a 20 year period of operation for both radio stations, Radio Andorra and Andorradio/Sud Radio.  Because of the similarity in name for the two large radio stations, Radio Andorra and Andorradio, and the obviously resultant confusion, the name for Andorradio was officially changed at that stage in French to Radio des Vallees d’Andorrre, that is, Radio of the Andorra Valleys.

Radio Andorra of the Valleys, station announcement on 818 kHz

In 1963, there was an intent to increase the power at Radio of the Andorra Valleys on shortwave from 1 kW to 10 kW.  However during that era, FM broadcasting was gaining popularity worldwide, so instead of remaining on shortwave, this station went to FM, both in Andorra itself, and soon afterwards within France also. 

In an endeavor to improve the mediumwave coverage area for Sud Radio, a new location was sought, and an isolated area on the summit of Pic Blanc, White Peak, close to Andorra’s eastern border with France, was finally chosen.  The program feed from the downtown studios to the isolated country transmitters was accomplished by an underground cable as well as by a microwave radio link.

The new transmitter station at Pic Blanc was taken into service in 1964, with a 300 kW Thomson transmitter on 818 kHz. Soon afterwards, the original 100 kW transmitter at Encamp was removed and reinstalled at Pic Blanc, and there was an attempt to combine the output of both transmitters in order to increase the international coverage from Sud Radio. 

On October 23, 1967, the famous World War 2 French leader General Charles de Gaulle (as President of France at that time) made a visit to the Pic Blanc transmitter station while on a state visit to Andorra. It was during this era that Radio des Vallees d’Andorrre, that is, Radio of the Andorra Valleys officially became Sud Radio, South Radio.  Give a few more years (1972) and another Thomson mediumwave transmitter, rated at 600 kW, was installed thus permitting a combined output power of 900 kW.

The 20 year period for the licenses of both Radio Andorra and Sud Radio was coming to an end during the year 1981.  Both stations needed a license renewal; but instead, they were both surreptitiously closed, in an edict promulgated by the Council of the Valleys, the Andorran version of federal parliament.

It was on Thursday April 2, 1981 soon after 1900 UTC that both Radio Andorra and Sud Radio were closed. One of the main problems, though by no means the only problem, was that the two large radio stations were serving an international audience with their radio programming, with very little programming intended for local coverage within Andorra itself.

Interestingly four days later, Sud Radio was again on the air in Andorra, though by that time additional production studios were already in use in France itself. Then on November 24, (1981) the French government extended the license for Sud Radio in Andorra due to the nationwide elections in France. 

In March 1983, the Pic Blanc transmitters were noted on air again, and the station remained in spasmodic service for apparently another four years.  In 1987, the station was finally silenced, and partially dismantled, though by this time, Sud Radio was on the air via a small network of stations within France itself.

Since then, Radio Catalunya in nearby Spain requested usage of the Pic Blanc transmitter site in 2004, though this request was never granted. A subsequent suggestion has been to turn the mountain top building into a snow sports stadium, though this concept has not yet been fulfilled either.  Currently guided tours take visitors through the station, and much of the electronic equipment is still installed, but certainly not all.
Next time: The Radio Wars in Andorra
(Adrian Peterson-AWR Wavescan/NWS 552)

Cook Island update

Radio Cook Island QSL (Gayle Van Horn Collection)
Back three years ago, we presented a series of topics here in Wavescan on the radio scene in the South Pacific Cook Islands.  OK, now fast forward to the current era, and we find that the two latest editions of the New Zealand DX Times provide us with an update on the current radio scene in the Cook Islands, and that is what we present here in Wavescan today.  This interesting information is also available on the Cook Islands website.

The 350 feet tall medium wave mast at the Matavera transmitter site has been in use for many years, and due to the salt water atmosphere, it has become quite rusted, particularly in the mid section.  As a safety factor, it was necessary to demolish this tall radio tower. 

Radio broadcasting came to the Cook Islands in 1954 under Percy Henderson, who constructed the first two low power transmitters, mediumwave and shortwave, with used equipment provided by the New Zealand Broadcasting Service.  The original transmitter location was at Blackrock, on the western edge of Avarua on Rarotonga Island.

Fourteen years later (1968), a new Marconi transmitter with 10 kW on 630 kHz was installed in the grounds of the Takitumu School at Matavera, on the eastern coastline of Rarotonga Island.  The older Blackrock station was then relegated to backup status.  In preparation for the demolition of the radio mast, the activities of the Takitumu School were transferred off campus to a temporary location.

At midnight on Wednesday August 7, (2019), the medium wave transmitter was turned off for the last time, thus ending the usage of mediumwave in the Cook Islands, and the radio tower has since been demolished.  The shortwave service came to an end more than a quarter of a century earlier, back in 1993, due to a malfunction in the transmitter itself.

A low power FM transmitter on 101 MHz had already been on the air in parallel with what was the medium wave service, thus providing radio coverage to much of the capital island, Raratonga.   Portable FM receivers can tune this 101 MHz channel, though the FM radio receivers in motor vehicles imported into these islands from Japan tune only the Japanese FM Band 1, and not the standard American FM Band 2, and they don’t tune up as far as 101 MHz.

In addition, the low power FM relay stations in the southern group of the Cook Islands are currently inactive due to technical faults, though the low power FM stations in the northern group of islands are all currently on the air with a relay from Rarotonga via the internet.  Work is underway to upgrade the entire FM network, and to change the operating frequency of all of the low power FM relay stations from current 88.8 MHz to the new 101 MHz.

In case of any form of nationwide emergency in the Cook Islands, such as hurricanes and tsunamis, it is currently possible to obtain rapid nationwide coverage via the internet, as well as by FM radio, and also by nationwide low power TV.  However, with local shortwave and now mediumwave off the air, as well as the earlier closure of Radio Australia, it is considered that the Cook Islands really need a more adequate single source for the rapid dissemination of emergency information throughout  their twelve populated islands. 

It is considered that reactivation and upgrading of the old Blackrock station is unadvisable, and a current investigation is looking into the possibility of a new mediumwave station at another suitable site.
(Adrian Peterson/AWR-Wavescan 552)

Vatican Radio plans special Sunday broadcast

Mauno Ritola reports on the WRTH Facebook group:

  
Vatican will have a special broadcast next Sunday 13 October 2019 at 08:00-10:15 UTC:
17635 kHz, Portuguese to South Africa
15575 kHz, French to West Africa
17865 kHz, English to India.

From the Isle of Music & Uncle Bill's Melting Pot schedules, Oct 13-19



From the Isle of Music, October 13-19:

This week, our special guest is award-winning clarinetist/saxophonist/composer Ernesto Vega, whose
beautiful new Jazz album Tradition and Beyond features six winners of  the JoJazz, Cuba's national competition for young Jazz artists.

The broadcasts take place:
For Eastern Europe but audible well beyond the target area in most of the Eastern Hemisphere (including parts of East Asia and Oceania) with 100kW, Sunday 1500-1600 UTC on SpaceLine, 9400 kHz, from Sofia, Bulgaria (1800-1900 MSK)
If you don't have a shortwave radio or are out of range, you can listen live to an uplink from a listening radio in the Netherlands during the broadcast at  http://websdr.ewi.utwente.nl:8901/?tune=9400am

For the Americas and parts of Europe, Tuesday 0000-0100 UTC (New UTC) on WBCQ, 7490 kHz from Monticello, ME, USA (Monday 8-9PM EST in the US).
If you don't have a shortwave or are out of range, you can listen to a live stream from the WBCQ website here (choose 7490) http://www.wbcq.com/?page_id=7

For Europe and sometimes beyond, Tuesday 1900-2000 UTC and Saturday 1200-1300 UTC on Channel 292, 6070 kHz from Rohrbach, Germany.
If you don't have a shortwave radio or are out of range, you can listen live to an uplink from a listening radio in the Netherlands during the broadcast at  http://websdr.ewi.utwente.nl:8901/?tune=6070am
Visit our Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/fromtheisleofmusic/



Uncle Bill's Melting Pot, October 13 and 15:
Episode 134, Alterlatino, is a mix of Punk and Ska from Puerto Rico, Rap Rock from Mexico, this and that from Colombia, and a couple of surprises.

The transmissions take place:
Sundays 2200-2230 UTC (6:00PM -6:30PM Eastern US) on WBCQ The Planet 7490 kHz from the US to the Americas and parts of Europe
If you don't have a shortwave or are out of range, you can listen to a live stream from the WBCQ website here (choose 7490) http://www.wbcq.com/?page_id=7

Tuesdays 2000-2030 UTC on Channel 292, 6070 KHz from Rohrbach, Germany for Europe.
If you don't have a shortwave radio or are out of range, you can listen live to an uplink from a listening radio in the Netherlands during the broadcast at  http://websdr.ewi.utwente.nl:8901/?tune=6070am
Visit our Facebook Page at https://www.facebook.com/UncleBillsMeltingPot/
 William "Bill" Tilford, Owner/Producer 
Tilford Productions, LLC

Thursday, October 10, 2019

Blog Logs

All times UTC // parallel frequency
Stations monitored 15 September-09 October, 2019

Logs and information welcome at: w4gvh@frontier.com


RTA QSL (Gayle Van Horn Collection)
Algeria
Radio Algerienne Chaine 1, Tamanrasset (10 kW) 909 kHz. Arabic phone-in report at tune-in 1518-1520. Announcer's commentary on Islam to men's vocal segments // Radio Algerienne Chaine 1,Illizi 1071 kHz (5 kW). Chaine 3 LW station 252 LW in French 24 hours. Tentative on Algeria's Radio Multichaine/Radio Qur'an on 1422 kHz AM, 1410-1435. Two male's Arabic conversation and announcement segments from tune-in.

China
China, CNR 1 VO China 4750 // 4800, 5945, 6125, 7230, 7290, 7305, 9500, 9845, 9860 kHz. Two announcer's trade newscript in Chinese. Most signals fair SIO 333. (China SDR) China Radio Int'l at English at 1315 on 9570 (SIO 222), 11910 kHz. Different program for 1300-1400 on 5955, 9730, 9870, 11760, and 15590 kHz.

CNR 11 Beijing, Fair signal for Chinese instrumental music, heard at 1325 on 7350 // 9480 kHz. Announcer's brief text 1330, returning to music program. China's CNR 2 Business Radio at 1405. Chinese business reporting format, on 3985 (under jamming), 6065, 7245, 7265, 7315, 7335, 7370, 7375, 7425, 9515, 9775, 9820 kHz. (China SDR)

CNR 5 VO Zhonghua, Chinese at 1414 on 5925 (SIO 434) // 7385 (SIO 444), 9665 kHz (SIO 434). Announcer's trade script to musical interlude at 1415. Station announcements to Chinese easy-listening vocals 1417-1421. Fanfare, jingles, promos and interview segments. (China SDR)
 
Voice of Strait (tentative) 4940 kHz (SIO 443). Chinese radio drama including sound-effects and singing segments monitored 1432-1452. Occasional pauses for program narrations and jingles. (China SDR)

Clandestines
Denge Welat/VO Homeland 11530 kHz via Moldova relay to 1500. Kurdish music vocals from 1340 // with online streaming audio at http://www.denge-welat.org/. Announcer's items between tunes. Time tips 1400 into fanfare intro music, to Kurdish news script format. Station is former Denge Kurdistane, targeting listener's across the Caucasus and Near East. Schedule shifts to Issoudun, France relay 1500-2100 UTC. (NLD SDR)

Echo of Hope/VOH 3985, Korean programming 1545 under heavy jamming.  Parallel frequencies observed as; 4885, 9100 (no jamming), 5995 and 6250 jammed. male/female practicing language skills with bits of English included. (China SDR)

Radio Sana'a/Rep. of Yemen Radio 11860 kHz. Arabic vocals 1320 tune-in to brief announcement pause. Arabic vocals program interspersed with promos for terrific signal SIO 444. Assumed to be aired from transmitter in Saudi Arabia, and in support of Yemeni president Hadi. (Qatar SDR)

Radio Tamazuj 15150 kHz via Madagascar relay from 1505. Announcer's Sudanese Arabic running // on 15400 via Issoudun, France relay. Presumed newscast and brief references to "Radio Tamazuj" at 1512, continued reporting format, including phone reports. Additional ID 1516. Slight delay via Issoudun. (NLD SDR/Qatar SDR)

Voice of Wilderness 7615 kHz (Tashkent, Uzbekistan relay) (tentative) from 1410 tune-in. Station wasn't being jammed from my tune-in during religious vocal music and male's Korean sermon cadence to 1421. Continued religious format, prayer and vocals. ID format 1430 into instrumenetal piano and prayer and text. Instrumental hymn, To God be the Glory 1459. Announcement to 1500 sign-off as scheduled. Website: http://www.cornerstone.or.kr/ (NLD SDR)

Congo Republic
Radio Congo 6115 kHz, 1823. French text covering topics about Congo to male/female segment. Very poor signal and barely SIO 232. GRG schedule to 2000, needs extra monitoring. (S Africa SDR)

Cuba
Radio Havana 6000 kHz, 1310. Spanish news and commentary on // 9535, 11760 and 13740 kHz. Musical jingles, promos and station IDs for Radio Habana Cuba. Additional news on Latin America.



Egypt
ERTU Cultural/Songs 1341 kHz (100 kW), 1750. Male/female announcer duo trade chats with Kenny G as background music. Station info routine at 1800. Not a peep from Radio Cairo, for shortwave at any hour and various frequency checks. Active ? (Kuwait SDR) ERTU/Gen Prgrm in Arabic. Audible from 1435 tune-in Qur'an on 882 (SIO 333) // 936 (SIO 222) 981 (SIO 222) 1305 (SIO 333).

Eritrea
VO Broad Masses-Prgrm 1, 7140 kHz. Tentative Amaharic text to 1750. Horn of Africa music almost buried in poor conditions. No sign of Prgrm 2 on 7180 kHz.

Eqt. Guinea                                 
RTVGE Radio Bata, 5005 kHz. Instrumental music tune Bolero at tune-in 1827-1829. Lady's Spanish announcement into Spanish pop tune. DJ format with announcement into Spanish pop tune 1834-1839. New easy-listening vocal tune 1840-1844. Spanish guitar ballad 1845. Drop out by 1900 (SIO 433) (S Afr SDR)

Ethiopia
Radio Amhara, 6090, 1910. Tune-in to Horn of Africa musical vocals. Presumed talk and text is in listed Amharic. Fair signal with intermittent co-channel interference to 1950. Ethiopia's FBC Radio Fana significantly better on 6110 kHz. Presumed programming is in Oromo (or Somali) for announcer's news briefs and HOA musical vocals. Good signal on subsequent 6090 kHz check at 1735 tune-in. Lady's HOA vocals to 1738. Brief comment to new music. Fair SIO 322. (S Afr SDR)

Voice of Tigray Revolution, 5950 kHz (100 kW). Regional Horn of Africa vocals at tune-in 1850-1855. Announcement in listed Afar or Tigrinya. Signal fair to poor, peaking by 1905 amid HOA vocals. (SIO 322/433) Audible from 1740 on 5950 kHz, as male/female trade briefs to 1745 fanfare. Phone-in

India
All India Radio/Aligarh 9620. Indian sitar and tabla from 1400 tune-in. Continued Sindhi service music program, interspersed with brief announcements. Schedule to 1500. Fair signal with fades SIO 222. AIR External service in English 1900-1945, monitored on 9445.

Jordan
Jordan Radio/Main Program 855 kHz, Qur'an recitations in progress at 1250 tune-in to 1300. Station reference at 1300 into Arabic newscast to 1313. Announcer's items on Iraq, Iran, and Kuwait to 1318. Recitations resumed at close of news. Signal clear and no interference (SIO 333) (Kuwait SDR) Same program format and SIO 1530 recheck.

Kuwait
Radio Kuwait 1341 kHz, 1435 tune-in amid Qur'an to 1445, followed by station ID. Arabic music 24 hours on 1134 kHz. Main Program in Arabic 540 // 1134 kHz. (Kuwait SDR)

Mali
ORTM Radio Mali 5995, 1815 tune-in to African ethnic vocals to 1825. Musical jingle to announcer's French comments. African highlife vocals to 1830. Chat, jingles and a brief news headline format into African xylophones reminiscent of music from Mozambique. Good signal from tune-in (SIO 343). GRG schedule to 0000. Recheck signal at 1850, with unknown African language (Bambura or ethnic?) as announcer reads text. It should have been English news per their schedule. Fair reception for the autumn equinox on 23 September. Presumed news at 1900. Brief musical interlude, followed by announcer's talk. SIO 322(S Africa SDR)

Malaysia
RTM Sarawak WAI FM 11665 kHz, 1340. Announcer's Asian news topics in Malay and items on Kuala Lumpur. Pop vocal variety. SIO 434. Recheck on subsequent days on 11665 kHz, 1410 kHz. Morning-show format of announcer's conversations, national items and Malay pop vocals. (SIO 433). (Philippines SDR).

Philippines
FEBC Radio, 9400 kHz. 1357. Chinese service's closing information on station, followed by interval signal melody of Jesus Saves song, to 1400 closedown. Chinese service from 1400 on 9345. Station ID into morning religious programming and musical interludes. Both frequencies via Iba, Philippines. Schedule for this segment runs to 1600 UTC Javanese service on 15620 kHz (Bocaue, Philippines) 1400-1430 with religious sermon. Lahu service (Bocaue) 11750 kHz, 1400-1430. (New Delhi SDR)

PBS Pilipinas, 9910 kHz, "PBS Pilipinas..the Voice of the Philippines" at tune-in 1917. Audible on // 12120 (best SIO 444) and 15190 (SIO 222). Filipino pop vocals to 1921. Easy-listening vocals tune to 1927. Announcer's English/Filipinos ID, frequency and station promo located "in Manila, Philippines". Closing national anthem 1928-1929.All frequencies targeted to the Middle East. (New Delhi SDR).

Saudi Arabia
SBA Itha' Huna Al Azm, 11745 kHz. Arabic service targeted to Yemen with low-level Arabic text. SIO 322. SBA Radio Saudi Gen Prgm 1 on 9650 from 1455. Traditional Arabic music to 1458 for announcer's Arabic references to Saudi Arabic including identification. Intro melody at 1500 into newscript format. Frequency 9650 kHz scheduled to broadcast to 1755.SBA Radio Saudi Qur'an from 1457 on 13710, shift to 15205 kHz at 1545. SBA Saudi Radio International on 17660 kHz in French to 1600. SBA Saudi Radio International 9895 kHz Pashto service 1400-1558; Persian service 1157-1757 on 7240 kHz. SBA Qur'an channels (24 hours) 783, 855, 900 kHz AM/ 100 kW. (Qatar SDR) SBA Radio Riyadh 1440 kHz (1600 kW). Arabic briefs between men's Arabic chorus music, and selections of easy-listening tunes. SBA Qur'an in progress 1510 on 810 kHz (10 kW), SBA Radio Jeddah 810 (5 kW) underneath with men's Arabic chorus. (Qatar SDR) SBA Radio Riyadh on medium wave in Arabic at 1730-1740 on: 945 (SIO 333) // 1071 (322) 1215 (222) 1449 (SIO 222) 1449 (SIO 222) SBA R Saudi Call of Islam 1745 on 594 (222) 783 (333) 1422 (333).



Sultanate of Oman
Radio Oman, 9620 kHz, 1510 tune-in. Great signal (SIO 444) for US/Euro pop tunes. English ID as "Nation Station" Taylor Swift music. Schedule is 1500-1600 hour in Arabic. Muddled audio by 1540 recheck in Arabic with traditional music and Arabic discussion. Radio Oman on 558 kHz (SIO 322) // 1242 kHz (SIO 333) in Arabic with radio drama presentation between Arabic vocals, 1520-1540 tune-out. Arabic on 9620 also audible at this time, though not parallel. (Qatar SDR)
 
Sudan
Sudan Radio/General Prgrm 7205 kHz (100 kW) 1705 tune-in. Male/female trade Arabic conversation and briefs. Low-level audio SIO 222. Easy-listening music 1715-1717. Arabic promos after fanfare. Lady's presentation including phone-in call, talks and music from 1724. Signal fair-poor with intermittent peaks. Sudan's VO Africa /Sudan Radio in English 1715-1800 on 9505 kHz. My tune-in 1750 to announcer's English teaching Islam to 1757. African vocals to 1802 time tips. Announcer's ID routine in listed Hausa with news script format. HOA tunes from 1808. Fair signal SIO 332. (S Afr SDR)

Tajikistan
Radio Tojikiston Prgm 1 (Tajik Radio 1). Tentative as station on 4765 kHz, 1435-1505. Low-level audio (SIO 222) as text reading in what may have been Tajik or Uzbek. Female's brief comment into Middle-Eastern musical vocals 1452-1458. Top-of-the hour announcement (ID ?) into recitations format and reading text. Checked reception for Voice of Tajik on 7245 kHz from 1507. Similiar program format in presumed Tajik and running // with 1143 kHz AM. (Kuwait SDR)
(Gayle Van Horn/Teak Publishing)

New edition: WWDXC Top News




The latest edition (October 9, 2019) of the WORLDWIDE DX CLUB "Top News," compiled by Wolfgang Bueschel, has been posted:https://www.wwdxc.de/topnews.shtml

WORLDWIDE DX CLUB
Postfach 1214
D-61282 Bad Homburg
GERMANY
Fax: +49 6172 123117

Top News: http://www.wwdxc.de/topnews.shtml
E-Mail: mail@wwdxc.de
World Wide DX Club: http://www.wwdxc.de 

Monday, October 07, 2019

Weekly Propagation Forecast Bulletins



Product: Weekly Highlights and Forecasts
:Issued: 2019 Oct 07 0338 UTC
# Prepared by the US Dept. of Commerce, NOAA, Space Weather Prediction Center
# Product description and SWPC web contact www.swpc.noaa.gov/content/subscription-services
#
#                Weekly Highlights and Forecasts
#
Highlights of Solar and Geomagnetic Activity 30 September - 06 October 2019

Solar activity was very low throughout the past week. No active regions with sunspots were observed nor were there any coronal mass ejections.

No proton events were observed at geosynchronous orbit.

The greater than 2 MeV electron flux at geosynchronous orbit reached high levels each day of the summary period.

Geomagnetic field activity reached active levels on 30 Sep and 01 Oct due to weak coronal hole high speed stream effects. Quiet and quiet to unsettled conditions were observed throughout the remainder of the period.

Forecast of Solar and Geomagnetic Activity 07 October - 02 November 2019

Solar activity is expected to be very low throughout the outlook period.

No proton events are expected at geosynchronous orbit.

The greater than 2 MeV electron flux at geosynchronous orbit is expected to reach high levels on 07-09 Oct and 25 Oct-2 Nov. Normal or normal to moderate levels are expected to persist through the remainder of the period.

Geomagnetic field activity is expected to reach G1 (Minor) geomagnetic storm levels

Product: 27-day Space Weather Outlook Table 27DO.txt
:Issued: 2019 Oct 07 0338 UTC
# Prepared by the US Dept. of Commerce, NOAA, Space Weather Prediction Center
# Product description and SWPC web contact www.swpc.noaa.gov/content/subscription-services
#
#      27-day Space Weather Outlook Table
#                Issued 2019-10-07
#
#   UTC      Radio Flux   Planetary   Largest
#  Date       10.7 cm      A Index    Kp Index
2019 Oct 07      68           5          2
2019 Oct 08      68           8          3
2019 Oct 09      68           8          3
2019 Oct 10      68           5          2
2019 Oct 11      68           5          2
2019 Oct 12      68           5          2
2019 Oct 13      68           8          3
2019 Oct 14      68           8          3
2019 Oct 15      68           5          2
2019 Oct 16      68           5          2
2019 Oct 17      68           5          2
2019 Oct 18      68           5          2
2019 Oct 19      68           5          2
2019 Oct 20      68           5          2
2019 Oct 21      68          12          4
2019 Oct 22      68           5          2
2019 Oct 23      68           5          2
2019 Oct 24      68          18          5
2019 Oct 25      68          25          5
2019 Oct 26      68          12          4
2019 Oct 27      68          10          3
2019 Oct 28      68           8          3
2019 Oct 29      68           5          2
2019 Oct 30      68           5          2
2019 Oct 31      68           5          2
2019 Nov 01      68           5          2
2019 Nov 02      68           5          2
(NOAA)

DRM Plans Workshop on Digital Radio Implementation



Set for Oct. 9–10 in Kuala Lampur

MICHAEL BALDERSTON, 08 September 2019

Asian-based broadcasters who are considering a transition to digital radio will have the opportunity to receive an intensive course focusing on the subject at a workshop organized by the Asia-Pacific Broadcasting Union and the Digital Radio Mondiale Consortium.

The DRM Digital Radio Implementation and Rollout workshop will take place from Oct. 9–10 in Kuala Lampur, Malaysia.

The workshop is designed to give attendees an understanding of DRM digital radio services, its technology and features, planning methods, step-by-step implementation examples and the sharing of solutions and strategies for those looking to move from analog to digital radio.

Additional text at Radio World: https://tinyurl.com/y5x58964

Wednesday, October 02, 2019

Radio Emmeloord plans special broadcast on 05 October


Dutch broadcaster, Radio Emmeloord, will air a special shortwave broadcast on 05 October, 2019. The low powered station notes they will be "rocking all over the world," and invite listener's to tune-in at 1100-1600 UTC on 6095 kHz with 125 kW.

The station also broadcast on 1224 kHz AM, bringing their listeners music from the 1960's, 70's and 80's, local current events and talk radio. To contact the station, go to the Reactie link at: https://radioemmeloord.nl/ Tune-in to Radio Emmeloord anytime from the online LIVE audio link. The station also has a Facebook account.
(BDXC/Teak Publishing)

Tuesday, October 01, 2019

Special broadcast rescheduled for Mini Transat sailing race



France
There will be a special shortwave broadcast for the Mini Transit sailing race transatlantic yacht race which start stopover in the Canary Islands.
Schedules are listed as; October 2 - 13, as follows:
1500-1600 UTC in AM (250 kW):

The race has been delayed by bad weather and is now expected to start around 2nd October.  There will be a second leg, starting from Gran Canaria, in early November.
Tests were heard on 5970 kHz on 29 Sep from 1500 English, very strong SIO 555 here (DK)
Thanks also to Mauno Ritola WRTH)
(BDXC/Oct 2019)

Mini Transat 6.50 also known as Transat 650 is a solo transatlantic yacht race, and associated Classe Mini class, that starts in France and ends in Le Marin bay, Martinique in the Caribbean. The race covers over 4,000 miles with a stop in the Madeira or the Canary Islands.

Weekly Propagation Forecast Bulletins


Product: Weekly Highlights and Forecasts
:Issued: 2019 Sep 30 0233 UTC
# Prepared by the US Dept. of Commerce, NOAA, Space Weather Prediction Center
# Product description and SWPC web contact www.swpc.noaa.gov/content/subscription-services
#
#                Weekly Highlights and Forecasts
#
Highlights of Solar and Geomagnetic Activity 23 - 29 September 2019

Solar activity was very low throughout the summary period and no active regions with sunspots were observed.

No proton events were observed at geosynchronous orbit.

The greater than 2 MeV electron flux at geosynchronous orbit reached very high levels on 29 Sep with high levels observed on 28 Sep. Normal and normal to moderate flux values were observed throughout the remainder of the week.

Geomagnetic field activity reached G1 (Minor) geomagnetic storm levels on 27-28 Sep due to the influence of a recurrent, positive polarity coronal hole high speed stream (CH HSS). The active conditions were observed on 24 and 29 Sep and quiet or quiet to unsettled conditions were observed throughout the remainder of the period.

Forecast of Solar and Geomagnetic Activity 30 September - 26 October 2019

Solar activity is expected to be very low throughout the outlook period.

No proton events are expected at geosynchronous orbit.

The greater than 2 MeV electron flux at geosynchronous orbit is expected to reach high levels on 30 Sep-12, 14, and 25-26 Oct. Normal and normal to moderate levels are expected for the remainder of the outlook period.

Geomagnetic field activity is expected to reach G1 (Minor) geomagnetic storm levels on 24-25 Oct and active levels on 06, 21, and 26 Oct due to coronal hole high speed stream influences.

Product: 27-day Space Weather Outlook Table 27DO.txt
:Issued: 2019 Sep 30 0233 UTC
# Prepared by the US Dept. of Commerce, NOAA, Space Weather Prediction Center
# Product description and SWPC web contact www.swpc.noaa.gov/content/subscription-services
#
#      27-day Space Weather Outlook Table
#                Issued 2019-09-30
#
#   UTC      Radio Flux   Planetary   Largest
#  Date       10.7 cm      A Index    Kp Index
2019 Sep 30      68          10          3
2019 Oct 01      68           8          3
2019 Oct 02      68           8          3
2019 Oct 03      68          12          4
2019 Oct 04      68           8          3
2019 Oct 05      68           8          3
2019 Oct 06      68          12          4
2019 Oct 07      68           5          2
2019 Oct 08      68           5          2
2019 Oct 09      68           5          2
2019 Oct 10      68           8          3
2019 Oct 11      68           5          2
2019 Oct 12      68           8          3
2019 Oct 13      68          10          3
2019 Oct 14      68           8          3
2019 Oct 15      68           8          3
2019 Oct 16      68           5          2
2019 Oct 17      68           5          2
2019 Oct 18      68           5          2
2019 Oct 19      68           5          2
2019 Oct 20      68           5          2
2019 Oct 21      68          12          4
2019 Oct 22      68           5          2
2019 Oct 23      68           5          2
2019 Oct 24      68          18          5
2019 Oct 25      68          25          5
2019 Oct 26      68          12          4
(NOAA)