Tuesday, August 12, 2014

What's New in radio books ?

Capital Region Radio (Images of America)
The General Electric Company, with one of its main plants in Schenectady, began experimental broadcasts in conjunction with Union College in the early 1900s. When WGY officially began broadcasting in February 1922, General Electric started a long and storied history of pioneering radio technology and programming that set the pace for worldwide broadcast development. Capital Region Radio pioneer WGY provided entertainment and news nationally during World War II, WTRY kept listeners updated during the blackout of 1965, and WOKO introduced rock and roll to the area. Thousands of schoolchildren from Utica and Pittsfield woke on snowy winter mornings to hear WGYs Bill Edwardsen read the school closing announcements, and listeners enjoyed entertainment from Boom Boom Brannigan and Don Weeks. Capital Region Radio: 19202011 offers a glimpse into the programs and personalities of local radio from its early days to recent years.

Radio's Digital Dilemma
The first comprehensive analysis of the United States’ digital radio transition, chronicling the technological and policy development of the HD Radio broadcast standard. A story laced with anxiety, ignorance, and hubris, the evolution of HD Radio pitted the nation’s largest commercial and public broadcasters against the rest of the radio industry and the listening public in a pitched battle over defining the digital future of the medium. The Federal Communications Commission has elected to put its faith in "marketplace forces" to govern radio’s digital transition, but this has not been a winning strategy: a dozen years from its rollout, the state of HD Radio is one of dangerous malaise, especially as newer digital audio distribution technologies fundamentally redefine the public identity of "radio" itself.
Ultimately, Radio’s Digital Dilemma is a cautionary tale about the overarching influence of economics on contemporary media policymaking, to the detriment of notions such as public ownership and access to the airwaves—and a call for media scholars and reformers to engage in the continuing struggle of radio’s digital transition in hopes of reclaiming these important principles.

A Broadcast Engineering Tutorial for Non-Engineers

The leading publication on the basics of broadcast technology. Whether you are new to the industry or do not have an engineering background, this book will give you a comprehensive primer of television, radio, and digital media relating to broadcast—it is your guide to understanding the technical world of radio and television broadcast engineering. It covers all the important topics such as DTV, IBOC, HD, standards, video servers, editing, electronic newsrooms, and more.
This long-awaited fourth edition includes new standards and identifies and explains the emerging digital technologies that are revolutionizing the industry, including:

  • HDTV—and "UltraHD"
  • IP-based production and distribution and Internet delivery (including "over-the-top" TV)
  • Connected/Smart TV, Mobile TV Second Screens and Social TV
  • "Hybrid" broadcasting (over-the-air and online convergence)
  • Podcasting and Mobile Apps
  • Connected Cars
  • (www.amazon.com)